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Fuel Solenoid

Railroads

Registered
Hi Everyone,

I've managed to get a Kohler engine,

Family WKHXS.6742GB
Model No. CV675S
Spec No. 75532

I need a new fuel or anti backfire solenoid.

What is the part number for this solenoid?

Robert
 

gdstew

Registered
Please sit down--- I used partstree.com and kohler.com came up with part number 24 757 45 s for $158.41

You can check the operation, 9 volt is suppose to make it work. Some people cut off the end of the needle and let it go.
 

Railroads

Registered
Thanks.

I hear some use a bolt and just remove the thing completely.

On this engine it appears that device makes up part of the jet assembly.

I might not be so interested in Kohler engines now.

This is my first one. I know nothing of this brand.

Robert
 

gdstew

Registered
odd size bolt, that's why some stick the old part back in. I don't remember any solenoids being part of the jet, but that particular carb was "troublesome" in the limited experience I had with them. We used Kawasaki on the bigger equipment.
 

Railroads

Registered
odd size bolt, that's why some stick the old part back in. I don't remember any solenoids being part of the jet, but that particular carb was "troublesome" in the limited experience I had with them. We used Kawasaki on the bigger equipment.
The coil isn't burned. But the thing is stuck solid from having water and bad fuel sitting in the carb for years.

Robert
 

Railroads

Registered
That's what I was thinking Edward.

Just got to do some digging and find the correct after market carb.

I just cut the little rod thing off and the engine started and ran for a few minutes.

Robert
 

Sonny Reese

Registered
I used to have them in about everything I owned,---clipped everyone of the tips off----problem solved. IH had it bad sticking them on 706 , 806 and other model tractors to make the engine shut down when you turned it off, otherwise they would keep slobbering on.---it was their cheap fix for a major design flaw of the engines.
On some of the small engines,---they were wired into the system to prevent the de-activation of them,---as we know nothing is impossible to disable. Some can just be un-pluged and thats it.
If you cant soak or heat it enough to get it loose,--clip it and go. not worth spending money on a part that serves no useful purpose.
 

gdstew

Registered
"their cheap fix for a major design flaw of the engines."


Thank the EPA for that part. Most small engines could not meet EPA standards at both fast speed and idle speed, so they set the engine to run fast and lean. You use to be able to idle an engine but tractors are set for medium to fast speed. (note- small mowers don't have throttle controls anymore) Came time to shut down, you had a hot (lean) and fast running engine, that when the ignition was turned off, the engine kept turning and filled the muffler with raw, unburnt gas. The gas would "sizzle" and then ignite, blowing your $150. muffler wide open. Usually happened when you were about 10 foot away causing what was called "brown shorts syndrome" . Kohler wasn't the only ones to use these, B & S and Kawasaki also had them. Another way to stop the after-fire was to do like the small lawnmowers and install brakes on the flywheel. I think those would have been very impractical and expensive.
 
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