• If you like what you see here and your interests are compatible with our 30,000 other users, Welcome. Fill out the registration form with your interests, your real name (seen only by moderators) and your city, state or country. Your account is then manually checked and approved. There is too much funny business on the web for us to do otherwise. Be sure to use a working email address and do not use cloaking or anonymous web connections.

Gaar-Scotts are Grrrrreeaattt!

Mike McKnight

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/20/2020
I step forth to make no exaggerated HP claims, just say they were a well-made, easy to handle, easy to fire engine with plenty of HP to thresh, plow, road-grade, run sawmill, etc., as they were originally designed for. :D If it was about 100 yrs ago, and I was going into any of the above businesses, I'd be writing to Richmond Indiana to see about ordering several tons of their finest iron and steel and getting it delivered to the local depot.

Any other Tiger lovers care to contribute????

Mike McKnight-my real name, though some know me as steamdaddy :wave:
 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Mike,
This is what your new engine may have looked like when it arrived on the flatcar and being unloaded? This Big Forty is being unloaded from a flatcar at Floweree, Montana in 1911.



This is what a 40 Gaar Scott looked like in the USA in 1958. I even had hair then!


Gary;)
 
J

Jim Jake Templin

Guest
Well, shux, since we aint up for no zajerated claims I can't tell you about the time we you the 22 you now have pulled 36 bottoms, 18"deep, belted to a 42" threshing machine, all while whistling "Dixie" in four part harmony.:D :eek:

Next week I shall do my best to run my myopic eyeballs across a 25hp double Gaars sidemount plower.
 

G Willikers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
06/03/2020
Mr. McKnight - Here's a picture from a couple of years ago of the big double tandem at WDM Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Just a sweetheart of an engine; watched them belt her up to the saw mill and it looked like it was a pleasure to operate.
G.
 

Attachments

Gary Schmidt

Registered
Age
74
My Dad and Uncle were raised up with a 1905 18HP Garr-Scott. They used it to pull a sawmill and thresh wheat. The boiler was in bad shape in the early 1960's so they bought a 22 HP Keck Gonnerman to pull a new Frick 01 mill they had just bought. I never saw the Garr-Scott under steam but they always said they thought the GS had more power than the Keck. I dont know if the Keck was out of adjustment or what but that is what they said.

Gary Schmidt
 

Lippy

Agitator
20 R.H. - The first picture in which you posted appears as though it is a straw burner in viewing the smoke stack. Is this correct? Gosh, doesn’t it just give you chills thinking some lucky bugger got a brand new engine delivered right to his home town depot!!! Then he looked at the thing and said, “How do I run this thing?”

L. Lickwater
 

ChadYelland

Registered
Age
39
Well, outa the engines i have run around the WDM the Gaar is one of the best, built strong, ease to fire, conveinant controls but not placed so you hit your head on them, like some engines, Give me twice the moving parts for 3 times smoother running anyday!
 

Eric M.

Registered
Age
27
20 Reeves Highwheeler said:
Mike,
This is what your new engine may have looked like when it arrived on the flatcar and being unloaded? This Big Forty is being unloaded from a flatcar at Floweree, Montana in 1911.

This is what a 40 Gaar Scott looked like in the USA in 1958. I even had hair then!
Yipes! Is that one gaar-scott being unloaded being pulled off, or moving off under its own power? I'd sure be scared to operate a steamer going on a DOWNHILL incline like that.

Nice pictures :)
 

HalfKeck

Registered
Last Subscription Date
05/17/2016
Gary welcome to the stak, as a fellow TN steamer, I am glad to see you here. How are your engine restoration projects going?

I know steamdaddy will be esp glad to see you here as well, I do not know if it will work having two GS guys in TN here though....I may have to go cut his computer wires lest the talk get out of hand:eek:
 

Gary K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
25 h.p. Gaar-Scott twin cylinder (# 15206). It was manufactured in 1908 and was a demonstrator at the Minnesota State Fair in 1910. It is one of the original steam engines on the Threshing Grounds in Dalton, Minnesota, and has been running every year.

Mr. George Huggert from the Henning area was the first owner. He sold it to George Melby and Albert Gilbretson in 1919. Ralph Melby bought it in 1920 and used it for custom threshing for the next 10 to 12 years. It is currently owned by Ralph's son and grandson, Luther and Leif Melby.

The crankshaft broke in 1920. Ralph replaced it in 1921. A Case flywheel was used and moved closer to the bearing to prevent another broken shaft. The gears were moved to the other side and a Mogul tractor clutch was installed all by hand, drilled and tapped by Ralph Melby.

Information taken off of a posting on the engine!


 

Mike McKnight

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/20/2020
Gents, thanks for all the neat pics! I too would like to know the story on the little 16 HP in Illinois. What SN is it?

Big Bro JJ-let me know what that big double is like........I'm real interested to hear about it!

Gary S-I've seen that old 18 HP out in the woods. I really enjoyed visiting with the 90+ yr old gentleman that owned it at the time-was that your father or grandfather?

G. W. and 20 HP RH-I'm jealous you've been able to see a Big 40 Gaar under steam and I haven't! I'd love to pull the throttle on one!!!!

Gary K-that big 25 DSG "custom" is a neat example of what folks could do back in the old days. Glad they were able to make those repairs and keep 'er going, that's one RARE engine nowadays!

Mike M
 

L Melby

Registered
Gary K said:
25 h.p. Gaar-Scott twin cylinder (# 15206). It was manufactured in 1908 and was a demonstrator at the Minnesota State Fair in 1910.
I have been getting little bits of info on the Gaar Scott, One person told me that the serial number is most likely from 1910, not 1908 (my dad wasn't sure of the date)
Another person told me that my Dad had written to Gaar Scott and told them that the long crank shaft just would not work and wanted to move the gears to the other side, Gaar Scott wrote back and said that that could not be done.
Now,,, telling a Melby that something could not be done is interpreted as a challenge. So he changed it.
I think I noticed that newer Gaar Scotts have the same set up as my Dad had done to his engine, am I right?
Not only are Gaar Scotts Grrrreeaattt, they are Beeauuutifuulll.:) :) :cool:
L. Melby
 
J

Jim Jake Templin

Guest
"I think I noticed that newer Gaar Scotts have the same set up as my Dad had done to his engine, am I right?" JMelby

You are right-they went to a right hand drive on the later rear mounts, although they had a bracket and arm coming up and back from the boiler to support the clutch end of the crankshaft and "rigid things up" to prevent flexing.
 

Gary K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
I have been getting little bits of info on the Gaar Scott, One person told me that the serial number is most likely from 1910, not 1908 (my dad wasn't sure of the date)
Another person told me that my Dad had written to Gaar Scott and told them that the long crank shaft just would not work and wanted to move the gears to the other side, Gaar Scott wrote back and said that that could not be done.
Now,,, telling a Melby that something could not be done is interpreted as a challenge. So he changed it.
I think I noticed that newer Gaar Scotts have the same set up as my Dad had done to his engine, am I right?
Not only are Gaar Scotts Grrrreeaattt, they are Beeauuutifuulll.
L. Melby
L. Melby:
That's not the first time a manufacturer gets ideas from an operator, farmer, or a "Jack of all trades." Unfortunately they usually never give credit where its due!

How'd you make out with the leaky handhole plate on Friday the 8th? I was watching you drive the Gaar-Scott out of its parking spot, then you backed it up, then started pulling the fire. I asked an engineer why you were pulling the fire, and he said, there was a leaky handhole plate. I took 2 pictures and left, as I figured a man with a camera hanging from his neck, and asking questions might not be too welcome?

I noticed the 22 h.p. Advance Straw Burner had a leaky tube or two, so I snapped some photos . . . one of the front tube sheet! It appears one tube had been replaced, and water was flowing out of it. Also noticed one tube was plugged.

Thanks for the additional information!!!

Gary K
 

L Melby

Registered
Gary K said:
L. Melby:
That's not the first time a manufacturer gets ideas from an operator, farmer, or a "Jack of all trades." Unfortunately they usually never give credit where its due!

How'd you make out with the leaky handhole plate on Friday the 8th? I was watching you drive the Gaar-Scott out of its parking spot, then you backed it up, then started pulling the fire. I asked an engineer why you were pulling the fire, and he said, there was a leaky handhole plate. I took 2 pictures and left, as I figured a man with a camera hanging from his neck, and asking questions might not be too welcome?

I noticed the 22 h.p. Advance Straw Burner had a leaky tube or two, so I snapped some photos . . . one of the front tube sheet! It appears one tube had been replaced, and water was flowing out of it. Also noticed one tube was plugged.
Thanks for the additional information!!!

Gary K
I don't have any information about the 22 H.P. Advance.
About the Gaar Scott, The engineer that was running the engine on Friday was not me, (I was on the Rail Road Friday and Sunday), He told me that the gasket blew and I went to look at it. The gasket had stopped leaking at 50 lbs. Later, when I removed the handhole plate, I noticed that the gasket had slipped a bit.
I put a new gasket in and we (me and the engineer you met) ran all day Saturday witout a problem.
Sunday morn I was back on the RR when I got word that the same handhole gasket blew again while steaming up. When I got up there the problem was taken care of by others.
A real bummer. It has never happened to me before and hopefully never again. The boiler inspector is working with me on this. It will get fixed!

Overall, we had a good time at the show.
L. Melby
 

Gary K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
(I was on the Rail Road Friday and Sunday)
L Melby
L Melby:
Again . . . thanks for your reply. I know what you mean about leaky handholes . . . bummer! Been there, done that!

Thats one beautiful engine (your Gaar-Scott), you have something to be proud of. Especially when its kind of rare, as Mike McKnight has stated elsewhere.

I might have you in a picture or two, as I took some photos of the RR too? Nice thing about digital cameras, you don't have to spend money developing photos . . . just download them into the computer.

Gary K
 
Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Lippy Lickwater said:
20 R.H. - The first picture in which you posted appears as though it is a straw burner in viewing the smoke stack. Is this correct? Gosh, doesn’t it just give you chills thinking some lucky bugger got a brand new engine delivered right to his home town depot!!! Then he looked at the thing and said, “How do I run this thing?”

L. Lickwater
Lippy,
It certainly has the straw burner screen and cap on the stack. I'm not smart enough to know if they placed that on all engines leaving the factory or whether only the straw burners got them? I am not old enough to have seen a new traction engine arrive on a flatcar, but that would have to be a darn exciting thing, especially to the owner's son, if he had one!

One thing I have noticed about the 40hp Gaar Scott, with the crows nest, like this one; the man up there has no control other than steering, up there. The guy who can't see as well - is the one on the throttle.

I don't always mean to "pontificate Reeves" on these threads, as some may believe, but I just wanted to state that the man above, on a 40 Reeves, had all of the engines' controls up there, other than the injectors and the fire box door.
Gary;)
 
Top