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Garage find Honda

Firewoodguy

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/01/2019
My brother found this Honda in a garage not far from us and figure I take a ride. We ended up picking up a very nice 1 owner 110 with low miles. Has the high low range which is a plus. Interesting factory auxiliary fuel tank also. Spent some time with it and he had it running. Purrs like a kitten. Kinda getting harder to find these older Honda’s in decent condition. I can remember back in the day when they were everywhere, starting to get like a needle in the haystack! Don’t see many around anymore.
 

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DaveHC

Registered
I have had two of those , the older 90 c.c. models , they are a lot of fun to ride and use . That low rang will surprise you with the climbing . You made a great find / deal there . Have fun with it .
 

Firewoodguy

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/01/2019
the low range is handy for hill sides. here is another pic of our 65' that has the double sprocket that I think your talking about
 

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Firewoodguy

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/01/2019
Andrew, I once found a young woman! But she didn't get along with my taste of old iron. Pop, tells me to keep looking, at the retirement homes that is. :brows:
 

I like oldstuff

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
Years ago when I was in the bike biz a guy came rolling in in a CT110. An older semi disabled guy that was living in an Air Force retired assisted living home somewhere in the eastern states. This guy was doing a tour to Alaska then Mexico on this 40 mph bike.

He stopped in for a rear tire that was down to the cords and I noticed it had like 20,000 miles on it. It was a bit wheezy so just to fuel his passion I tossed a set of rings in it and touched up the valve seats as a freebie. Hell, it only took a couple hours and about $20 out if the till. About a year later I got a post card from him. He made the trip and the bike had like 35,000 miles on it.

---------- Post added at 06:32:22 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:09:31 PM ----------

With a low range it would be a nice ride around engine shows
When in the bike biz we often marveled at how much grunt these things must have in lo-lo. One day we had our chance and for a grin one of my guys took a CT110 and hooked it to a customer's single axle dump truck. These typically weigh 13-15,000 empty. The bike pulled it on the flat concrete street and he got it into 2nd which might be 10 mph.

We never had a chance to see if it would pull it loaded but I doubt it.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
30-maybe 40 years ago mom was good friends with an irish "Padre" (that is a priest in gringo lingo) that rode a little Honda across Africa saving souls, he even got chased by a herd of elephants on that thing. He wrote a book about his travels, pretty sure I have a copy, cannot remember if I ever read it. Trying to remember title, something like "where elephants walk", maybe roam, I forget.
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
nice score! i had its little brother the trail 90, it was a load of fun. i had the chance to try one out a few years ago, it was not near as fun but then again i am almost 100 lbs heavier than i was back then!:eek:
 
Even though this is an older thread, I had to put my two bits worth in.....

I gave my son the "family" 1966 CT90 trail bike that ALL of us learned to ride on as kids. He completely stripped it and we sandblasted the frame and various other parts. Everything was painted the correct red and carefully reassembled. During this process, a friend of mine GAVE me another 1966 that had been stored in his barn. That bike became mine and went through the same process. Now we had two "matching" mid sixties 90's that hauled us through Nevada ghost towns and old mining camps.

I found a 110 at the local junkie dealer. He was asking $600 for it, but the priced dropped immediately when I discovered he didn't have the ownership papers (pink slip). My son bought that one also and went through it. Not having to change sprockets and add chain was quite a treat!

The one thing I discovered during this whole process was that Honda was worlds ahead of everyone else when it came to machining. The inside of those engines was absolutely breath taking! Aside from a little cylinder honing and new rings, all the bikes were in very nice shape as received. The frames and accouterments might have been a little "tinny", but those engines were designed to the max!
 

Motormowers

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Back in the early 80's I ran the wheels off a C70 Passport scooter. Dead nuts reliable and couldnt kill it. Then I graduated up to dirt bikes and had a momentary loss of common sense and bought a Yamaha IT175 which was broken more than it ran. Switched to Honda 4 stroke enduros I could ride on and off road and never had a problem.
 

DKamp

Registered
Soichiro Honda was a "practical engineer", meaning, he saw things form a multi-disciplinary perspective. The inside of that engine was spotless, because he believed that tools were a 'workaround' for processes that shouldn't require tools. A part that required secondary operations to be complete, was reason to seek a better design, and better method... and his tuition was expensive, but the education was priceless.

Recovery from WW2 was a difficult path for everyone, and his was especially so. The thought of taking on die-casting aluminum was considered absurd by most manufacturing realms, but when he decided it to be the standard process for his motorcycle engine parts, he saw it as the 'right' choice. Although die-casting was expensive, it made up for itself in quality, repeatability, and most of all... second operation.
His conviction was clear: When he stood by a machine tool, and saw metal getting cut off into chips, he didn't see a part being made, he saw precious metal being torn off in a waste of time and resources... the part should NOT be made, only to be cut into to be made 'correct'. By investing in die-casting, he could make parts that required substantially less second-operation in order to be ready-to-assemble, and furthermore, he could improve the dies such that the rough, nasty debris that appeared, could be corrected in ONE TOOL, rather than correcting it's results in a hundred-thousand parts.

My 1979 Honda CX500D was the engineering work of Soichiro Irimajiri... whom Soichiro Honda recruited Irimajiri out of Tokyo University in '63, he was obviously a little bit green, but very bright... it did not take long for him to display contrasting opinions with his boss... particularly in cooling. Honda had spent his life from WW2 on building motorcycles with air-cooled engines. Irimajiri realized that liquid cooling was superior in many ways.

Soichiro Honda could have made edict that 'all engines were to be air-cooled'... but he did what many leaders choose not to do: He put progress ahead of his pride, and turned Irimajiri loose with a two-fisted challenge- Build BOTH types... so that's what happened.

One of Irimajiri's unique engineering demonstrations, was the CX500... an 80-degree V-twin, common crankpin, odd-fire. If that wasn't unconventional-enough for a Japanese motorcycle, the engine was longitudinal (crankshaft fore-and-aft), the cylinder heads rotated to splay the exhaust ports outward, and carbeurators inward. The heads had four valves- two each intake and exhaust, a centrally located spark plug in hemispherical chamber, a domed piston... a camshaft in the valley, with PUSHRODS actuating two valves each...

And at the front end of the camshaft, a seal, with shaft sticking out the front of the engine, and a mechanical cooling fan.

People called it just about everything unpleasant, from ugly to geeky... and it may not be a rocket in street-drags, but nobody calls it an unreliable or unrobust machine. My 1979 CX500D is at about 300,000 miles, and all I ever do, is change the oil, change the filters, change the fuel, and rotate the tires (the last two are done in the conventional manner- start the engine, twist the throttle, and let the clutch out).

I've never had that engine open, but I'm absolutely certain that if I ever do, I'll find oil, and moving parts, and the rest will be spotless.
 

I like oldstuff

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
Back in my bike biz era Honda was a master at engine building. They did have their lemons though and cam chain tensioning was one of their sore spots.

The CB 360 was a turd of a cheap design with a lot of problems and no less than IIRC four recalls on the valve train. I was glad to see that model die. The CX500 also had three cam chain tensioner recalls. My guys got to the point they could pull the engine, lay it on the radiator and do the tensioner mods in just over an hour. When they came out with the CX650 in '83 it was transformed into a gem. Then after one year they abandoned it. I had a CX650 Turbo and ran the hell out of it for 40,000 miles with not one issue.

Irimajiri was the resident God at Honda with many important designs like the F1 engine, the CBX etc. He shook the industry when he quit and went to a gaming company I think Nintendo, as you were expected to stay at a company for life.
 

DKamp

Registered
None of my CX's (I've got two 500's and a 650C) have ever given me any chain tensioner problems. The '79 CX500D has the marks of correction (three punch marks by the serial number). I believe one of the biggest challenges of the CX's tensioner was the mechanical cooling fan. My fan hub started delaminating from the fan at about 38,000 miles, and when I went to the boneyards and looked through all the candidates, I saw two distinct categores- CX's that the fans had been removed, and fans that the hubs had become loose from the blades....

So I found a wrecked FJ-1200, and took the electric fan out, and it fit almost perfectly inside the CX fan shroud. I bought it, took it home, and spent three hours with a bent hacksaw blade in two Vise Grips, slowly sawing through the camshaft just past the seal. once out, I started the engine (yeah, just for 30 seconds) used a flap-disk in a 4" grinder to clean up the end and soften the edges. Then I fitted the FJ fan, put it back together, added a relay and an adjustable voltage-sensing circuit to read the temp gauge. It's been automatic for the last. 250k or so. That's exactly what Honda did with the later model CX and GL 500/600's, and after that mod, I noticed my chain tensioner has needed basically no attention.

Iri was promoted to top-man in the USA, working out of the Maryville, Ohio plant that assembled the Goldwings and CBX's. He developed some heart problems, resigned in '92 and had to head back home for treatment, and it took a while for that recovery. It was Sega (video games) that pulled him in as VP in '96 , which didn't work out too well (the world of video game tech was changing too fast)... he bowed out in 2000, and went to Ashai Tech (castings).
 

Motorhead

Subscriber
Age
67
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
I still have about 3 early 60's Honda C110 (sport 50) engines and a C100, 3 speed, auto clutch engine. I also have 2 of the C200, 90cc push rod engines.
When I was a young kid, about 12, I had a Steens mini bike that my Dad and I put a manual clutch, Honda Super 90 engine in it. To say the least, it hauled ASS and in those days, you could have a street legal mini bike in Commiefornia.. I just acquired a running, pull start ATC110 engine that runs great and has the HIGH-LOW range transmission. I am restoring my 1967 Triumph 200 cc Tiger Cub.
 

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