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George White from Ontario now in Poland -Help needed

G Willikers

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
05/01/2019
Greasy,
Probably yes on the dry pipe, but not sure about a baffle? The baffle came up on Mr. Repko's earlier post and perhaps that is something Mr. Oliver does, in lieu of a dry pipe?
I am baffled most of the time, so who knows?
 

DrAndrzej

Registered
Hi

Greasy Iron wrote perfectly actual situation of the boiler .
I have UDT book (actual , 2017) with all subjects connected with building and calculating pressure devices including steam boilers , 670 pages withs materials, calculations, etc. - im reading , trying to use it to my case , all ideas are consulted , and sometimes occures contradictions between UDT recomendations and practical methods/solutions .

Back to Steam Dome doubts :

here is fragment of blueprint , "16" is a dry pipe

i do not have possibility to check mine now(small camera only ) , but i'd like to know if i understand this schematics correctly :

red arrow - this pipe is tight mounted into the barrell (reinforced socket ) , constantly goes to the " blue arow" point , where is output of steam

im not sure about this pipe inside steam dome - there are cut big holes .
how many ?
where is the lowest and the highest hole ?
what is diameter of dry pipe ? - is this reduced to 2" on blue arrow point ?, how many holes , what diameter ?
is the dry pipe closed at the "start point " ?

it would be great to see a few even scrapped cuted steam domes , 1 picture worth 1000 words , but unfortunatelly here is no such possibility
Steam Dome.jpg
regards
Andrzej
 
Last edited:

GreasyIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
Looking at the print, I'm thinking G Willikers is correct: no additional baffle, unless you decide that instead of dry pipe.

Comparing this one to the prints at the beginning of this thread: at some point they didn't bother to extend the pipe much further into the dome than just above the barrel, so not capped on that style. The one in this print is higher, so I'd expect capped. You wouldn't want to get too high and block flow to your main line, else I doubt extact hieght critical. Likewise, the number of holes in this section, probably not critical. That shows 3, probably through both sides. Maybe there were another pair front/back, staggared with the 3 side/side.

I expect the firebox end was capped, so steam was collected over a distance through the small holes along it.

With a welded boiler you'll probably use couplings, or half couplings instead of doubling plates at the threads. Depending upon how you make the top, it may be plenty thick with out a half coupling.

I cannot tell on the prints, but would expect about a 12, maybe 16, mm hole on each side ( lowest point inside the dome), and a small one at the bottom of the elbow for water to drip out while warming, and while steaming down; still merely a guess.
 

David Hoover

Subscriber
Hi Andrzej. Hope your doing ok during the worlds new crisis. I was looking through my copy of “laying out for boilermakers” circa 1918. This book follows the recommendations of the Hartford Insurance co and meets the British Colombia boiler regulations of the period. The toughest boiler regulations in Canada at the time. Dry pipes had holes from 3/8 to 1/2 inch diameter. The total area of these holes need to have from 2 to 3 times the area of the steam outlet, so they don’t restrict or increase the passage of steam through them. They need drains on the bottom. Their ends were capped but didn’t need to be water tight and a horizontal pipe had the holes on the top half only.Dry pipes were developed to replace domes and when combined with a dome work well. One thing to mention is that there’s no real set design for domes or dry pipes, the flow of unrestricted clean, dry steam was the important part, shape, location, mounting was left to the design of the manufacturer, some working better than others to minimize priming and improve operation.
 
Last edited:

David Hoover

Subscriber
Hi

Greasy Iron wrote perfectly actual situation of the boiler .
I have UDT book (actual , 2017) with all subjects connected with building and calculating pressure devices including steam boilers , 670 pages withs materials, calculations, etc. - im reading , trying to use it to my case , all ideas are consulted , and sometimes occures contradictions between UDT recomendations and practical methods/solutions .

Back to Steam Dome doubts :

here is fragment of blueprint , "16" is a dry pipe

i do not have possibility to check mine now(small camera only ) , but i'd like to know if i understand this schematics correctly :

red arrow - this pipe is tight mounted into the barrell (reinforced socket ) , constantly goes to the " blue arow" point , where is output of steam

im not sure about this pipe inside steam dome - there are cut big holes .
how many ?
where is the lowest and the highest hole ?
what is diameter of dry pipe ? - is this reduced to 2" on blue arrow point ?, how many holes , what diameter ?
is the dry pipe closed at the "start point " ?

it would be great to see a few even scrapped cuted steam domes , 1 picture worth 1000 words , but unfortunatelly here is no such possibility
View attachment 383170
regards
Andrzej
The dry pipe should be a snug fit so steam enters through the holes in the pipe. The drawings in the previous pics show a well supported and installed pipe within the dome of the 25 hp White 1584896840143.jpeg
 
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