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Getting much done during quarantine?

RustyNumbat

Registered
Well either this paint didn't like me using generic thinners, or I didn't apply it in thin enough layers because I just have to lightly chip at it with the weight of a screwdriver and it's coming off in clean flecks :kick: It comes off the primer so cleanly, perhaps it hasn't bound to it properly...

Here we go, full restoration done no more to do on this tractor good job all round :crazy:

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cobbadog

Registered
Bugga!
Flaking or sheeting off? Sounds like preparation or oil on the surface. In the first pic of the rocker cover I can see that the paint has a wrinkled finish on the lower right hand side. This is either rejection of a contaminant under the top coat. Yes you can get paint reject other paint but that should have happened between the undercoat and the original paint first not between the primer and top coat.
Curious now I have said that, what type and brand of primer/undercoat did you use and what kind and brand of top coat have you used?
I do try to use a system that it is known to work, one brand from from primer to top coat.
 

RustyNumbat

Registered
Not sheeting off, just flaking off in tiny speck at the impact site when given a tap. The rocker cover was just onto the wired back and cleaned metal surface, the starter motor was wired back, cleaned then primed with a grey enamel primer. I can only guess perhaps I was a little too thick with my application of the orange, though I did try to do it in 3 light coats over 20 minutes. I think some areas hold up better than others to the fingernail so it might be the proof.

Can't get the starter motor to get a decent contact after re-installing it, even after cleaning the switch contacts. Happily I suspect it's an earth issue.
 
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cobbadog

Registered
A wired back finish is a very smooth finish and does not allow the paint to be 'keyed' to the surface. Maybe next item if it has been wired, give it a rub with some 240 grit paper to give it something to grip to then prep the surface by wiping with some prepsol or similar, let that dry then the primer, at least a day to dry properly and again a light sand, wipe, dry and top coats.
 

cobbadog

Registered
Hi RustyNumbat,
next time try to remember that when painting over gal or nickle plating you need an etch primer first to bite into the gal/nickle. Top coat straight over that works well.
Either way the trailer still looks better now than before. I need to re-spray mine too so it's on the bloody long list of things to do today.
 

RustyNumbat

Registered
next time try to remember that when painting over gal or nickle plating you need an etch primer first to bite into the gal/nickle. Top coat straight over that works well.
Just hacking at them a bit with some sandpaper or steel wool doesn't do the trick?

Oh great, now I get to stuff up with cutting a floorboard in half for the gap. Dad gave me a hot tip for the hand disc saw, you fix the plank in place then fix a straight edge alongside the work at the angle you want then just butt the saw against it as you make your cut.
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hceeB

Registered
Just hacking at them a bit with some sandpaper or steel wool doesn't do the trick?

Oh great, now I get to stuff up with cutting a floorboard in half for the gap. Dad gave me a hot tip for the hand disc saw, you fix the plank in place then fix a straight edge alongside the work at the angle you want then just butt the saw against it as you make your cut.
View attachment 396353
Make sure you leave a gap of say 6 to 8 mm and fill with silicone as those boards will expand and pop up, if they are not fixed down yet you can leave say a 5mm gap each side.
Geoff.
 

RustyNumbat

Registered
What's that, from moisture? Was planning on deck varnishing the top and doing the underside with that black weatherproofing stuff whats name I forget. They're actually floorboards with tongues and grooves that fit together...
 
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hceeB

Registered
What's that, from moisture? Was planning on deck varnishing the top and doing the underside with that black weatherproofing stuff whats name I forget. They're actually floorboards with tongues and grooves that fit together...
Yes the moisture will get in no matter what you do to try and seal the boards, thay will last a lot longer if you seal both top and underneath but leave some room for expansion.
Regards Geoff.
 

cobbadog

Registered
That idea of using a straight edge to run the saw along works well so run with it. As for the gap down the sides it is a good idea. Even with sealing it underneath with Ormanoid or similar product no matter what you coat the top side with eventually it will get scratched and allow moisture in and that is when the timber will swell and distort. Not rying to pick on you at all mate just offering some 'heads up' with the most likely outcome.
As a suggestion as well thin the first coat of varnish or polyurethane so that it really soaks in deep, then apply it as directed. Does the cam suggest 3 coats with a light sand between coats or not?
 

Scotty 2

Registered
What's that, from moisture?
I suppose it should be explained about the moisture and expansion.
Usually when the timber is to be machined it is kiln dried to get rid of all moisture. This is so a uniform machined board can be made. If the timber was not kiln dried then shrinkage of some boards can occur and expansion of other boards could occur due to differing moisture contents when machined giving gaps and bumps in the floor after a period of time.
If the timber was not dried well then moisture can still get in and the timber expands or it shrinks leaving gaps and then expands leaving humps.
With those tongue and groove boards I'd be leaving a 3mm gap between each board so they have a spot to expand into. Unless your in a really dry spot there's a good chance of the boards expanding making humps at each joint or a bigger hump every now and again.
Timber doesn't stay the same size throughout it's life. It expands and shrinks with moisture just like most soils shrink when it's dry and expand when it's wet.

I personally would not finish the floor with varnish. I'd oil it. Coats of 1/2 new engine oil and 1/2 diesel until no more soaks in from top and bottom.

I nearly accomplished something new yesterday. I tried to cut my ear off. Gladly I'm not very good at doing anything right.
I was cleaning some post holes out and I picked up my trusty old post hole shovel to put it over my should to move to the next hole when my wonky hands failed and let the shovel go. It slipped down and the foot bit on the top of the head come down across my ear hole peeling a nice fillet nearly off the side and then I think the sharp end whacked me on the noggin as well. It hurt like all buggery but amasingly it didn't bleed much.
Mrs Scotty laughed at me again. The neighbour reckons I'm hopeless at doing anything (he was hoping he could put a bull ring in my ear). Funny bugger he is.
 
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Jeff S

Registered
I suppose it should be explained about the moisture and expansion.
Usually when the timber is to be machined it is kiln dried to get rid of all moisture. This is so a uniform machined board can be made. If the timber was not kiln dried then shrinkage of some boards can occur and expansion of other boards could occur due to differing moisture contents when machined giving gaps and bumps in the floor after a period of time.
If the timber was not dried well then moisture can still get in and the timber expands or it shrinks leaving gaps and then expands leaving humps.
With those tongue and groove boards I'd be leaving a 3mm gap between each board so they have a spot to expand into. Unless your in a really dry spot there's a good chance of the boards expanding making humps at each joint or a bigger hump every now and again.
Timber doesn't stay the same size throughout it's life. It expands and shrinks with moisture just like most soils shrink when it's dry and expand when it's wet.

I personally would not finish the floor with varnish. I'd oil it. Coats of 1/2 new engine oil and 1/2 diesel until no more soaks in from top and bottom.

I nearly accomplished something new yesterday. I tried to cut my ear off. Gladly I'm not very good at doing anything right.
I was cleaning some post holes out and I picked up my trusty old post hole shovel to put it over my should to move to the next hole when my wonky hands failed and let the shovel go. It slipped down and the foot bit on the top of the head come down across my ear hole peeling a nice fillet nearly off the side and then I think the sharp end whacked me on the noggin as well. It hurt like all buggery but amasingly it didn't bleed much.
Mrs Scotty laughed at me again. The neighbour reckons I'm hopeless at doing anything (he was hoping he could put a bull ring in my ear). Funny bugger he is.
I'd tell you to be more careful Scotty but shit happens no matter what. Sometimes I think if I didn't do dumb shit I wouldn't do anything at all:headbang::bonk:
 

cobbadog

Registered
We have all been down that road Scotty, just get better and on with it Fella. Not nice to be laughed at by ya missus though, unless you can get away with it back at her.
 

hceeB

Registered
That idea of using a straight edge to run the saw along works well so run with it. As for the gap down the sides it is a good idea. Even with sealing it underneath with Ormanoid or similar product no matter what you coat the top side with eventually it will get scratched and allow moisture in and that is when the timber will swell and distort. Not rying to pick on you at all mate just offering some 'heads up' with the most likely outcome.
As a suggestion as well thin the first coat of varnish or polyurethane so that it really soaks in deep, then apply it as directed. Does the cam suggest 3 coats with a light sand between coats or not?
That idea of using a straight edge to run the saw along works well so run with it. As for the gap down the sides it is a good idea. Even with sealing it underneath with Ormanoid or similar product no matter what you coat the top side with eventually it will get scratched and allow moisture in and that is when the timber will swell and distort. Not rying to pick on you at all mate just offering some 'heads up' with the most likely outcome.
As a suggestion as well thin the first coat of varnish or polyurethane so that it really soaks in deep, then apply it as directed. Does the cam suggest 3 coats with a light sand between coats or not?
Having been in the building and engineering game for many years have seen the power of expanding floorboards, the problem with leaving a gap at the tongue and groove joint is that it will fairly quickly fill up with dirt and will act as if there was no gap at all.
As I said in an earlier post no matter how well you seal the boards being in a trailer and open to all sorts of weather sooner or later expansion will occur, I note you are going to seal the top and bottom of the boards but the ends act like a sponge as well so it is very difficult if not impossible to seal timber trailer floors. Hardwood timber can expand up to around 28% in some environments, having said all that hardwood flooring in trailers has been around for a hell of a long time and wears well.
Geoff.
 

cobbadog

Registered
And hardwood decks on truck trays has also been around a while and not treated in any way. I recently replaced the boards on our old carry all with 1" thick hardwood planks and left them to the elements so that they will grey up and look better than the yellowish new colour. I never wanted to replace the old rotten ones but as I use it to load engines on then strap them down and then drive the tractor onto the back of Lorry it was at the stage of the engines falling through.
 
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