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Getting much done during quarantine?

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/17/2020
I don't know if it's the same as silicone but I use dielectric grease
Jeff .. I think the silicone stuff they are talking about is the rubber .. hardening .. gasket maker stuff.
I've had pretty good luck over the years by placing my new butt connector or any plastic coated wire connector .. against the silicone tube opening .. then a gentle squeeze until the goo is visible coming out the other end .... then stick the wire in & crimp it. Makes for a good weather / water proof connection. It also prevents "wiggle breakage" at the fragile stripped area .. where most wire / butt connections all seem to break off.

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Jeff S

Registered
Jeff .. I think the silicone stuff they are talking about is the rubber .. hardening .. gasket maker stuff.
I've had pretty good luck over the years by placing my new butt connector or any plastic coated wire connector .. against the silicone tube opening .. then a gentle squeeze until the goo is visible coming out the other end .... then stick the wire in & crimp it. Makes for a good weather / water proof connection. It also prevents "wiggle breakage" at the fragile stripped area .. where most wire / butt connections all seem to break off.

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Thanks Glenn I never thought of that of course I only been doin this shit almost 50 years :rotfl: You can bet I'll remember that one.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Trailers sit unused 80% of the time so frame earths oxidise, and connections develop resistance. I usually will buy a cheap house type extension cord and cut it up for the wiring. I'll run a separate cord to each lamp with all of them running to a junction box near the front of the trailer. A glob of silicone sealer at each light keeps the connections perfect. Inside the lamps all the contacts get coated with silicone grease. As water likes to get in past the lenses these are sealed with silicone sealer. Now they'll go many years with no failures unless of course some effwit breaks the lamp off.
*Or effwit me rolls a big log into the lights on the wood splitter vapourising it....
Hello all
We can't really do the extension cord thing over here. What lights do you fellas need on the backs of trailers in the US?
Most trailer lights need a ground wire, a clearance light wire, a stop light wire and an indicator light wire so the 3 core flex just hasn't got enough wires.
If I'm putting in normal bulb type lights I drill a small hole in the top and bottom of the light. Water is going to get in no matter what so I might as well drill a hole so the water can run out the bottom and the condensation can get out the top. It seems to be a better system then trying to seal the buggers. Lanolin grease coats all the brass connections and bases of the bulbs and the end of the twisted and soldered wire gets dipped before putting into the screwed terminal of the light (if it has them) . Good old sheeps fat does the job well.
Glenn. I don't have trouble with crimped terminals falling off. I support the main cables where the main terminal block is at the front of the trailer (I make a simple terminal strip for trailers, just some insulating material with some brass bolts through it) or where I need to use a crimp terminal and I usually put a loop in the wire where the terminal is. I put the loop in just in case the crimped connection becomes bad or burnt and there's always some more wire to use instead of looking for a 1/2 inch more wire. There's no stress on the crimped terminal.
Gees I wish I took pictures of some of the panels I've done over the years. I might do a dummy one later today.

Dual wall heatshrink......that's another name for the heat-shrink with the goo inside.
 

cobbadog

Registered
an interesting thought rushed past my brain when I read about the use of 3 core extension cords. I bought a PINKish one to loan out to anyone that wants to borrow one. This was my sure way that it was boomeranged back to me. No self respecting man WANTS a pink extension cord.
I too use good old Lanolin grease and also have the Lanolin oil as well for various uses. As you say Scotty, nothing gets past it or rusts under it. I have looked at the heat shrink stuff you mentioned Scotty and when I find a place that sells it will give it a go. How good are those gel connections?
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
Gave this Ronaldson and Tippet a clean and a run today. Think it's 3 HP engine No 6587 made in 1927. Made 100 ks from me in Ballarat Vic, I don't think there was many made of this model. I understand R & T got into trouble for this obvious copy of a Lister engine. There are differences, but it's a sure rip off! She runs nice, and started first turn after at least 5 years in the shed. I remember the late Jim Morgan (worked at R &T in the early days, a great old gent), told me they nicknamed them "The Lister Type". I have heard people call them G type. The "D" model came out after this. P S. I'm after an original muffler for this.
 
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cobbadog

Registered
Wreaks of Lister doesn't it. But R&T were not the only company to let's say 'duplicate' other makes of engines back then. Fuller & Johmson could have had a field day out here back then with farm pumpers alone.
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
Been trying to find a photo. I believe they were a cylinder with two cast ends. Here's a poor photo of one. Now, I may be wrong here, but that's what I think it should be? Patrick Livingstone, the bloke who runs the R & T register might know. Even the dimensions would be OK, Looks easy enough to make. Thanks.
 

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Scotty 2

Registered
Been trying to find a photo. I believe they were a cylinder with two cast ends. Here's a poor photo of one. Now, I may be wrong here, but that's what I think it should be? Patrick Livingstone, the bloke who runs the R & T register might know. Even the dimensions would be OK, Looks easy enough to make. Thanks.
Holes in the far cast end and about inch, inch and a 1/4 pipe?
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
Holes in the far cast end and about inch, inch and a 1/4 pipe?
Scotty, I have seen these twice. Confusing part is one was as you say, one had pipe go right through end! Funny thing about pipe sizes, always confused me above 3/4". Only read yesterday it goes off circumference. Internal for female, external for male, then there's a chart to read I think. i just googled it yesterday. I can't check pipe till later, but I'll try that theory out. Learn something every day.
 

cobbadog

Registered
That picture looks as if it has a water pipe flange on the bottom that the exhaust pipe screws into. Then the cylinder and not sure what is on top. One of those flanges would be a good start if you have to make one from scratch.
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
That picture looks as if it has a water pipe flange on the bottom that the exhaust pipe screws into. Then the cylinder and not sure what is on top. One of those flanges would be a good start if you have to make one from scratch.
Dead right Cobba, I just need someone to say that was the correct type muffler, and a few simple measurements. Could make a pretty close copy. I did some research, and IF I'm correct they were the first verticals they built, 1927 or so, before Lister got on to them that is! I know they had a real early vertical, pre 1910, but I mean first "production" type vertical. They apparently had no "Type" ID, but as I said earlier, Jim Morgan called them "Lister Type". Love to hear from someone who knows more,all I know is what I read, and we know that's not always right!
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Hello all
I went for a walk up the back and found one type that may suit. It has an inch water pipe shoved up it's date. There's another out at the farm that's similar but nothing alike. I think it has a similar bottom to what Aussie put up.
Cheers Scott
PS: I had to crop the first picture. Up the top you can just see Pongo's legs. I took the picture first thing this morning. Pongo was having his morning dump. I didn't realise until I went to put the picture up 🥴

IMG_20200623_072431 (2).jpg

IMG_20200623_072418.jpg
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
Does look similar. Thanks for your trouble Scotty. A bloke contacted me, says he will get me a photo of an actual engine with one on it. See what happens. Looks simple to make, hope to get some measurements off this bloke, then I'll start.
 

RustyNumbat

Registered
I've been out of action 3 weeks, twinged my back one week then the next week twinged it again and the following week became a crippled wreck barely able to roll over... Not bad for someone in their early 30s, haven't felt this bad since I got hit by a car years ago.

So I have no brake bands for my Allis C, anyone got ideas for me? I was thinking just some blocks of wood to jam up against the brake wheels..... slight braking is better than none!
 

cobbadog

Registered
Hope your feeling better RustyNumbat. Maybe make the metal bands up and take them to a brake service centre and get them to bond some lining on them or rivet some on in sections.
Scotty, thanks for being so considerate by cropping Pongos 'movements' out of the pic, we will be forever grateful!
To make the muffler, unless it is critical to be an original that pipe flange and then the pipe end cap is looking so very good.
 

Famous Fitter

Registered
I've been out of action 3 weeks, twinged my back one week then the next week twinged it again and the following week became a crippled wreck barely able to roll over... Not bad for someone in their early 30s, haven't felt this bad since I got hit by a car years ago.

So I have no brake bands for my Allis C, anyone got ideas for me? I was thinking just some blocks of wood to jam up against the brake wheels..... slight braking is better than none!
Are they the same as a B? I Have a Allis B wreck Here may have some in it ?
 

RustyNumbat

Registered
I believe they're the same. They're buggers to get out apparently, the pins just seize into place.

I've actually got some liners from that QLD mob that sells vintage parts, but I think the bands are a hinged two piece affair rather than just a single strip?

Edit - Manual
allis brakes.png

Huh, I wonder if I just found a really big metal pipe clamp I could use that :rotfl:
 
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