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Getting much done during quarantine?

Scotty 2

Registered
Hello all
I've been doing a bit out at the farm. I've been putting some new gates in the yards and here's the start of a new fence. Fairly short this one. About 80m in all. What a pain in the @rse it is cutting the angles in in the rails. The rest of the fence will just have a top rail like that on the left of the picture and 3 wires of tick tick below. The other end will have another gate and another panel or two of 3 rails.
The posts for the new carport at the dairy are in. I'll start concreting an apron on each side so the sandstone blocks can sit on the side where the cut is and another apron under the eaves of the dairy so I don't have to compact the gravel that'll go throughout the carport.
So far about 2-1/2 cubes of concrete mixed. Smart @$%# mate has concrete trucks and he said he'd bring some left overs out. 4 cubes of sand and gravel and a heap of bags of cement was dropped off one arvo when we weren't there. A sign was on the top of the big pile in the carport.... DIY. I'll get even one day.
Cheers Scott

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cobbadog

Registered
Hard work and time is all that is needed and you have been putting in both, well done. The last pic I remember of the farm was dirt and dust and you just got that Southern Cross mower running and by the looks of things here that mower must have broken down again as the grass needs cutting fella.
I remember when two blokes applied for a job as concreters and were hired on the spot. They were taken out to the middle of the dessert where one said to the other "quick lets get out of here before the cement arrives".
 

Scotty 2

Registered
he last pic I remember of the farm was dirt and dust and you just got that Southern Cross mower running and by the looks of things here that mower must have broken down again as the grass needs cutting fella.
Most of the green is a weed called Marshmallow and it came up where some of the black soil that was dug out was dumped for later use. It was black soil on top and clay under it.
We got an inch of rain in a downpour a while ago. It was so welcomed (first rain since January) but it did create a bit of a headache. The carport has about a 4 inch fall side to side and about 2 inch fall towards the far end. When it rained it picked up all the tiny bits of clay after doing the carport cut and dumped them in the 4 holes along the side cut. What a pain to clean out. It was like runny porridge or as the neighbour called it....calf sh!t. As I wanted to get back to firm, dry clay the holes ended up about 7-800mm dia instead of the 450mm and about a metre deep. 7-8 barrow loads of concrete in each hole along the cut. I'd chuck a barrow load in the hole and it barely covered the bottom. Anyways, they're done so back to digging a couple of fence post holes each day to put steel posts in and and mix some more concrete.
All good.
Another bit of a problem was putting the high posts through the dairy roof. I thought Frank the forklift would just lift them up and through if I put the short sling on just above balance point. Frank can lift 5m and I'm stupid. I didn't do the math or even think a bit. The posts are 4.3m above the ground let alone what's in the hole. Add to that the height of the eaves and I came to the realisation that I'm an idiot. Reality meant Frank didn't reach high enough for the bottom of the post to slide through the hole. It was get the post up as high as possible, swing bottom of the post onto the roof so the bottom is on the roof, lift the post like a caber up and lower though the hole and lower until the sling took over again. Thank goodness there was only 4 posts and Frank has side shift.
I can only put the purlins up that are above the dairy roof at the moment as the excavator needs room to put the sandstone in place and the tippers need room to put the gravel where it needs to be. I've already set up the big punch so I can punch slotted holes in the purlins. That'll save a heap of drilling. I need to pick the purlins up this week.

Cheers.
 
Last edited:

hceeB

Registered
Most of the green is a weed called Marshmallow and it came up where some of the black soil that was dug out was dumped for later use. It was black soil on top and clay under it.
We got an inch of rain in a downpour a while ago. It was so welcomed (first rain since January) but it did create a bit of a headache. The carport has about a 4 inch fall side to side and about 2 inch fall towards the far end. When it rained it picked up all the tiny bits of clay after doing the carport cut and dumped them in the 4 holes along the side cut. What a pain to clean out. It was like runny porridge or as the neighbour called it....calf sh!t. As I wanted to get back to firm, dry clay the holes ended up about 7-800mm dia instead of the 450mm and about a metre deep. 7-8 barrow loads of concrete in each hole along the cut. I'd chuck a barrow load in the hole and it barely covered the bottom. Anyways, they're done so back to digging a couple of fence post holes each day to put steel posts in and and mix some more concrete.
All good.
Another bit of a problem was putting the high posts through the dairy roof. I thought Frank the forklift would just lift them up and through if I put the short sling on just above balance point. Frank can lift 5m and I'm stupid. I didn't do the math or even think a bit. The posts are 4.3m above the ground let alone what's in the hole. Add to that the height of the eaves and I came to the realisation that I'm an idiot. Reality meant Frank didn't reach high enough for the bottom of the post to slide through the hole. It was get the post up as high as possible, swing bottom of the post onto the roof so the bottom is on the roof, lift the post like a caber up and lower though the hole and lower until the sling took over again. Thank goodness there was only 4 posts and Frank has side shift.
I can only put the purlins up that are above the dairy roof at the moment as the excavator needs room to put the sandstone in place and the tippers need room to put the gravel where it needs to be. I've already set up the big punch so I can punch slotted holes in the purlins. That'll save a heap of drilling. I need to pick the purlins up this week.

Cheers.
Whilst realizing it is not OH&S best practice, I have at times turned my forks upside down this gives a little more height, now I have a jib that fits on the forks which gives extra lift.

geoff.
 

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