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Gray Marine Engine

ulgydog56

Registered
just picked up a grey marine lugger sea scout 91 engine 25 hp from a older fellow for 200.oo he ran it about 2 years ago it runs smooth so I will go thru it and clean her up but I have no specs on it and would be appreciative of any infro or manuals pdf on this engine and trans if possible, thanks in advance....model or serial # F1919..ihave pics in the marine engine thread but it does not show up as a new post ?
 

MSchreiber

Subscriber
jim at finewoodboats.com will have anything or info u'll need.

i see ur near marysville, tons of vintage wood boat history there!
 

miro

Registered
Looks very similar to a Buchanan Midget - 23 HP . Has Hercules block . They did not have seals on the crankshafts - the oil has dribble holes to get the oil back to the crankcase. When they wear , you'll get smoke , but as long as oil pressure is OK ( eg 25 - 30 psi), there's no problem.

I use 12 V on the 6 V starter. It's better to get the engine to turn over smartly rather than grinding away hoping that it will fire. I kept everything 6V and use a second 6V battery to feed the starter. I charge the second 6V about 2 or 3 times a season.
Pertronix makes very good electronic substitutes for the breaker points -comes as a kit - works great. My engine is in a boat so it works for a living and needs to get me home - if you plan on only a show engine, then maybe you can make do with the existing points .

Most small engines like this that run in a boat, run very cool - lots of cooling water (maybe a bit too much?) so you might want to think about water bypass from the water pump to get it to warm up.
 

ulgydog56

Registered
continental is the parent Co. of grey marine they use there engines and add marine hardware and design to them, found that out...
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
Gray Marine Motor Company was a marinizer of MANY engines, and was such long before Continental Gray. There are farm more NON-continental engines marinized by Graymarine than there were Continental... but don't be surprised if the Gray Marine is any-of-the-above... Hercules, Pontiac sixes and inline-eight, AMC 327 V8... so it could be a Conti Y, or a Herc ZXB...
 

Brownboat

Registered
Last Subscription Date
10/03/2016
I know of a Gray Sea Scout that is a marinized Herc ZX block. It apparently is a early ZX block with pretty low serial number.
 

ulgydog56

Registered
you are correct sir the early units were herc,s continental must have bought into grey marine alittle later....(y)...got the pdf service manual but still looking for a owners manual pdf.....
 

Bud Tierney

Registered
Just to confuse matters, a 63 gasket catalog lists Sea Scout 91 as the Cont''l Y91 (the industrial version of the 91 CID), BUT also lists a Sea Scout Four 91 with the Cont'l Y4069 (the automotive version of the 69 CID)...
As if that wasn't bad enough, there's also a "Sea Scout"(apparently 1935-37) with the Herc ZXB and another "Sea Scout" (apparently 38-39) with the Y4069......
 

Brownboat

Registered
Last Subscription Date
10/03/2016
Bud, does the 63 gasket catalog list a Model 32A and / or 32B? I have one of each; although I have had a couple of people familiar with Gray's tell me there is no such models.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
Bud, does the 63 gasket catalog list a Model 32A and / or 32B? I have one of each; although I have had a couple of people familiar with Gray's tell me there is no such models.
Hee hee...

I would be disinclined to predispose myself to anyone's claim of 'non-existence', especially from 51 through 68. Post-war was a boom-time for recreational powerboats, particularly small ones, and marinizers of that timeframe would use darned near ANYTHING that was durable, in order to get power to the planking. Wartime manufacturing made small, durable industrial flatheads EXTREMELY economical to obtain, frequently in large quantities of wooden mil-spec crates, as war's-end-surplus. Marinizers big and small were buying them up for pennies on the dollar, quickly making patterns, casting fixtures, and swinging them into bilges.

The only thing you cannot prove, is that something is impossible. Impossible only means you're not willing to invest the time, energy, and resources to accomplish a goal. Proving that something does not exist, is exactly the same situation.

Until I was oh... 25, I never saw a Pontiac Chief straight-8 in a boat, and I wouldn't have believed it if someone had told me... nor an AMC V-8... nor a Sachs Wankel air-cooled single-rotor driving a hydraulic pump connected to a hydraulic motor on the keel of a sailboat, but I've got two of the three to prove it not only happened, but happened more than once...
 

PFT

Sponsor
Last Subscription Date
02/07/2020
Anyone ever seen an Oakland flathead 6 in a boat? A friend of mine restored a boat that has one, I fabricated the exhaust manifold for it. The original installer just clamped a piece of pipe to the stock manifold, didn't work too well, the varnish near it was blistered, probably lucky it didn't burn. Also had to do some machine work to the engine to install crank seals to keep water out when owner lets the bilge fill up too much.
PT
 

Bud Tierney

Registered
BROWNBOAT---Sorru, no 32 of any kind; if no ID shows up here, try oldmarineengine.com, who should be able to ID it for you...
 
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