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H.V. Hampton engines (pre 1900)

Sad Iron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/10/2019
Evening again folks.

Found the attached picture in a report on Gas Engines in Victorian History done in 2009
Link here, image is on the top left of page 8.

Clearly the date is wrong, name might be wrong too but I figured it couldn't hurt to ask if anyone had any info on the company (hopefully closer to 1890 as this appears to be a second generation Crossley slider)

Regards

Jonathan
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Peter Short

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Last Subscription Date
11/09/2017
Jonathan,

It's awhile since I read that paper, but it is about gas engines in the Australian state of Victoria and not about the historical era commonly referred to as "Victorian". The Hampton is given as an example of an engine made in Victoria, Australia. It might well be a copy of an English engine, but that is not the point. Coulson is another Victorian maker with their "Simplex" engine.

Apologies if I am stating the obvious (or spouting rubbish)!
 

Lew Carlton

Registered
Jonathan,
Herbert Vaughn Hampton started his business in Melbourne in about 1884. The earliest advert found was in that year in the 'Jewish Herald'! An old flier found at the HVH factory indicates they purchased casting patterns and drawings in 1897 from the estate of a Mr. Brierly, who had made the Victory engine at his works. A study of old company ledgers indicates engine production stopped around 1911. Study of a workshop book shows about 85 engines were built in total. They made gas & oil fuelled engines, portable and stationary. Engines were a side line for the company, never their main concentration. The engine ranged from 1.5 to 29 hp. Two 'Victory oil engines' appear on YouTube.
 

Eric Schulz

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Last Subscription Date
09/02/2009
Because some of our early engine manufacturers came from England, the engines they made looked similar to English engines. They learned their trade working for English engine manufacturers.

The Victory engine was first made by Andrew McLean from at least 1889. The next maker, as Lew Carlton said, was made by Brierly. I have never seen illustrations of engines of this era.

No illustrations of Hampton built Victory engines I have seen show a slide valve model. Lew maybe able to clarify this. It makes me wonder if the illustration of the slide valve engine is actually a pre-Hampton model.

Eric
 

Sad Iron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/10/2019
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So the image used in the paper doesn’t necessarily reflect who made that engine??

Here are two existing photos of second gen crossley sliders. These two happen to be larger engines but the similarities can be seen. Our crossley has too many features in common with them to skip researching them before we confirm it was a timed hot tube.

Thanks again for all your help

Jonathan
 

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Sad Iron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/10/2019
The engine in question does appear in their advertising from the time, not a very clear image but it is what it is as can be seen .
Odd that they would still use it for advertising when the design was 10 years old and sliders were almost obsolete.
 
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