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Head Gasket Repeated Failure Kohler K582 (Appears to have burned at spot near exhaust valve) Head bolts came loose in ten minutes

jimybuddiesel

Registered
please review photograph.

I had dismissed the resistance of the socket rubbing against the cooling shroud bracket when torque-ing this bolt. I am sure it was further compounded as this bolt happens to be closest to the exhaust valve. And, this bolt had some thread resistance and I could not get it all the way in with my fingers.

I choose to blame the issue on the manufacture design flaw rather than my incompetence.

will now incorporate the advice provided and try it again. Will follow up to this thread once completed
 

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Tracy T

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Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
And, this bolt had some thread resistance
If you ask me, you found at least 1 problem right here. clean both the bolts and the holes and try again. may do a retorque too as previously stated after warm up. If it does it again have the head checked to see if it is straight! I doubt the block is of much of a problem being its iron, but they can warp too. take a lot of heat to warp a iron block though.
 

Tracy T

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Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
Looking back @ 3rd picture in post 1, is that the same bolt hole that had resistance? if so i believe you have found your problem! it was burning out right in the bolt hole, indicating that bolt was not torqued properly, maybe due to dirty threads.
 

Fred Van Hook

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Age
70
Last Subscription Date
11/05/2019
Wire bolts have a application usually in heavy vibration.. They are a pain to install, have to make sure the wire is run through them the correct direction and a special tool is usually required to wrap the wire. In this application after the first initial run and everything has settled in it would make it very hard to re torque the bolts.. Just my 2 cents worth....
 

jimybuddiesel

Registered
yes, plan to re-torque after initial warm up, again after ran high for a couple of minutes, and probably a couple times beyond that.

I like the idea of wire locable thread idea, and the comment that it would difficult to unwire them to retorque. May consider just a few of them bolts, around the exhaust valve area.
 

Tracy T

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Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
I dont think the wire will do much if any good in this application, that bolt only has to turn a few degrees before torque is effected. I just dont think you will be able to get the wire that tight. and yes there is a special tool to spin the wire together between bolts.
 

Power

Registered
I dont think the wire will do much if any good in this application, that bolt only has to turn a few degrees before torque is effected. I just dont think you will be able to get the wire that tight. and yes there is a special tool to spin the wire together between bolts.
I agree. I do not think the bolts are backing off, I think gasket is compressing.
 

I like oldstuff

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Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
That gasket saw some high temps before it failed. Look at the blue color. That's around 700F! Clean the block surface and run a straight edge across it to see if the block is warped in the hot zone where your failure is. We'll assume the head is flat as you did the sanding routine.

Looks like a grade 8 bolt in the above pic. Are these Kohler original? Are they too long and bottoming out and not tightening the gasket?
At any rate replace all the bolts with the correct ones as they're stressed from x years and re use. Chase the threads and use oil on the threads and under the heads upon reassembly.

If these bolts are not original, a grade 8 bolt might not work well for this head gasket.
Why? A head bolt sees a ton of thermal expansion in the block and head when it's heated and technically is just a big spring, acting on the gasket. A grade 5 is softer and has more 'spring' to it. A grade 8 is harder hence less spring' action. This likely has merit as 'they got loose quickly'. Being stronger they compress the gasket and when cooled down technically are now looser. Then ya gotta do a retorque. If they are original, get a new set from Kohler.

Another issue is that the carb mixture seems a bit lean based on your report of the plug tip color which gives high combustion temperatures. If it has an adjustable main jet, open it ~1/4 turn. If not, go into the carb to look for dirt and partially clogged jets.
 

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Vanman

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Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I would next make sure that the suspect bolt threads in easily all the way, further than necessary to properly clamp the head. How do we know that it is the correct bolt, not too long and bottoming out without clamping the head?

Keith
 

CharlieB

Registered
Sounds like the OP found out why his two head gasket replacements failed; inability to properly use the torque wrench due to shroud interference.
That doesn't explain why the "original?" head gasket failed after one and a half seasons of successful operation. Extremely high temperature at that exhaust valve? Fuel related? exhaust restriction? Might be worth the time to investigate, (or just keep buying head gaskets.)
 

jimybuddiesel

Registered
I can not remember if the original blown gasket had the damage in the same spot or not, there is still a possibility that i may stumble across it.

I purchased the tractor a few years ago at auction, so I do not know how long the original gasket had been on it. These tractors are from the 1990's. The hour meter is about 350 but not original, but I would guess the engine is more like 1000 hours.

already cleaned the bolt threads, they are original and in great shape, and also chased the threads in the block.

I have ordered two gaskets, so if the first one fails after implementation of the advice provided by this thread, I will do as you mention and start figuring out what other issues could be causing the heat.
 
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edward moller

Registered
I can not remember if the original blown gasket had the damage in the same spot or not, there is still a possibility that i may stumble across it.

I purchased the tractor a few years ago at auction, so I do not know how long the original gasket had been on it. These tractors are from the 1990's. The hour meter is about 350 but not original, but I would guess the engine is more like 1000 hours.

already cleaned the bolt threads, they are original and in great shape, and also chased the threads in the block.

I have ordered two gaskets, so if the first one fails after implementation of the advice provided by this thread, I will do as you mention and start figuring out what other issues could be causing the heat.
those kohler twins where known for running hot, they where designed to run on 87 oct fuel. I had one on a big kutquick mower that would melt the #2 cyl head. replaced the head, when i would fill up the fuel tank i would add a gallon of diesel fuel to a 15 gallon tank. it cooled the exhaust down enough to solve the problem.
 
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