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Help confirm Hyster Spacesaver/Wisconsin VF4 engine

dr.diesel

Registered
Hello all, new member here.

With lots of reading here I believe I have figured out what this thing is, it was given to me by a friend with unknown history (other than it's been sitting for 30 years). I have searched every sq inch of this thing and cannot find a single ID tag on either the forklift or the engine. However the engine is so badly gunked up that any block casting numbers are not visible. Currently the drive wheels are seized up, but once I get them freed I'll pressure wash the engine which will help.

Thankfully the engine wasn't full of water and it was fairly easy to get running. However when I changed the oil it was SUPER nasty, black and chunks of crud coming out. I even scraped pasty junk with a slim screwdriver out of the oil pan via the drain plug, yuck! Given the oil condition I'm a bit hesitant to put much work into it, but perhaps the experts here can chime in? I suspect the engine calls for SAE30, I filled with 15w40 Rotella T as I always have that in-stock. The oil dipstick tube is missing so I don't know how much is required, added a gallon which I hope is enough for brief troubleshooting.

Here is a YouTube video of it running, showing a slight but not horrible about of blow-by, got a little bit worse than this as it warmed up a bit, and a few picts for ID help.

Thanks to all.

YouTube video,
 

Attachments

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
I Have a VH4D that is a fresh build, and i mean the works! bored, crank ground everything and when it gets put under a good load it has about the same blow by you are seeing with yours so i wouldnt worry to much about that at this point. may just be condensation burning off where it has been sitting. How about some pictures of the machine?
 

dr.diesel

Registered
Thanks!

Does that look like a VF4 engine to you, any idea on the oil capacity?

I'm pretty sure it's a SpaceSaver machine but might also be a QN-20, not that much info on the web on either. I'll get some more picts next time I'm over at the shop.
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
No idea how much oil yours uses, the vh4d if i recall holds 4 &1/2 qts with filter. yours is certainly different than a vh series. they made the VF, VH and a VG series that i know of. we have folks here that know alot more about the wisconsin's than i do!
 

K-Tron

Registered
It is a Wisconsin VF4 engine. The VF4s typically take 1 gallon of SAE 30 oil. It is probably impossible to pull the oil pan to clean the sludge out of the crankcase, without pulling the engine out of the machine. You may want to try draining the 15W40 out once the engine is hot to see what kind of nastiness comes out of the drain plug. If you have an air compressor nearby with a long blow gun, stick the blow gun down the oil fill/breather and mask around it with a rag. Use the compressed air to blow some of the junk out of the crankcase before refilling it again.

Chris
 

BGunn

Registered
What little I can see of the machine it appears to be a QN20. The engine will be a VF4 as stated above and the machine tag will be on the right side slanted surface opposite the control panel. If there are just holes in the plate then the tag is missing.
 

dr.diesel

Registered
Thanks to all, to summarize it's most definitely a VF4 and most likely a QN-20, which is a great help!

If there is convenient tap location to plumb in an oil pressure gauge perhaps if I can dig my through all the gunk I'll use that reading to further evaluate the engine condition.

More picts when I get back to my shop.
 

grub54891

Registered
Age
63
Last Subscription Date
06/08/2010
When I worked in manufacturing we had two of them. They were liquid cooled, the valve covers said Ford on them. They were ran daily, three shifts, and dependable. Me and the other guy in the forklift shop were pissed when they got rid of them, they required a lot less maintenance than some of the others we had at the time. All our forklifts ran on propane, all twenty of them.
 

dr.diesel

Registered
Minor update:

Was able to free the wheels, but the hardest was freeing the clutch/flywheel, which was finally accomplished with a 4000PSI pressure washer aimed in the bell housing, must have got the jet between the two and it split it apart! The hydraulics leak pretty bad but everything works, we're likely to dig further and make it a usable old school machine.

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