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Help with an old air compressor

37jpo287

Registered
I bought this compressor a while back and am looking for some help in getting it going. First, its a BEAST to pull start. Between the engine, the massive flywheel and the compressor itself, I'm struggling to pull it fast enough to start it. Is there supposed to be a trick to it or where the men really men back in the day lol. Also, can anyone give me any information about it? I know the engine is a AENLD and can look that up but I am not familiar with the compressor itself.

Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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37jpo287

Registered
Sorry but I'm used to working on cars and know next to nothing about compressors. How would I go about checking for decompression
 

112235

Registered
I bought this compressor a while back and am looking for some help in getting it going. First, its a BEAST to pull start. Between the engine, the massive flywheel and the compressor itself, I'm struggling to pull it fast enough to start it. Is there supposed to be a trick to it or where the men really men back in the day lol. Also, can anyone give me any information about it? I know the engine is a AENLD and can look that up but I am not familiar with the compressor itself.

Thanks in advance for any help.
Compressor is a Saylor Beale, most likely model 705.
 

112235

Registered
Unit has an unloading pilot valve that when desired pressure ie reached the valve opens & ports air from compressor overboard through a silencer which you can see in the 1st pic between the compressor & engine. If tank has pressure you can manually unload the pilot by pulling up & turning the stem a little to lock out.
 

gdstew

Registered
one "trick" to starting bigger engines or even high compression chain saws and such, slowly pull the engine over until it comes up to compression and stops. Then take up all the slack in the rope and pull it like you really mean it. Way less chance of getting a "kick back" when it fires.
 

37jpo287

Registered
Unit has an unloading pilot valve that when desired pressure ie reached the valve opens & ports air from compressor overboard through a silencer which you can see in the 1st pic between the compressor & engine. If tank has pressure you can manually unload the pilot by pulling up & turning the stem a little to lock out.
There's no pressure in the tank so nothing to unload. I did find a manual for the compressor after you told me the make. I'll go over it tomorrow. Hopefully it will help
 

37jpo287

Registered
one "trick" to starting bigger engines or even high compression chain saws and such, slowly pull the engine over until it comes up to compression and stops. Then take up all the slack in the rope and pull it like you really mean it. Way less chance of getting a "kick back" when it fires.
Yeah I tried that but its still a bear.
 

edward moller

Registered
thanks for the vid on compressor safety!!!!! that compressor looks like a SAYLOR BEALL, very good compressor. get the mag timeing right, carb adjusted right & it will start very easy. I had one for years that you could flip the compressor wheel to start.
 

radiodoc

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2021
I believe there was an optional 8-inch rope sheave for the AENL engine. I guess to make it easier to start in some applications.
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
I bought this compressor a while back and am looking for some help in getting it going. First, its a BEAST to pull start. Between the engine, the massive flywheel and the compressor itself, I'm struggling to pull it fast enough to start it. Is there supposed to be a trick to it or where the men really men back in the day lol. Also, can anyone give me any information about it? I know the engine is a AENLD and can look that up but I am not familiar with the compressor itself.

Thanks in advance for any help.
Here is a picture of mine, it is a two stage compressor. It starts easy with a rope. I roll the engine backwards until it comes up on compression, then pull the rope. It gives you almost two revolutions before it comes up on compression. Check the impulse on the mag. Roll the engine the way it runs slowly and watch the keyway in the output shaft. The impulse should click when the keyway is just past the top (TDC). Make sure the mag impulses. It should impulse every revolution.
 

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K-Tron

Registered
I would bet that your engine is turning over slow because the belts are old, the engine valves are sticky, and the magneto needs some lubrication from lack of use. Your AENL should start easily when dialed in. If that unit were mine, I would remove the engine, pull the oil pan, flush it out, check that the oil pump is working, top the engine off with SAE30 oil, adjust the valves and timing, and try starting it. Once you have the engine running properly, hookup the old belts and tension them accordingly.

Chris
 

37jpo287

Registered
So I played with it a little this afternoon. The spark plug was firing sporadically so I put a new D16 in and the spark is good now. I also pulled the carb and it was pretty funky inside so I ordered a carb kit and it should be in Monday. I'll probably follow K-Tron's advice and pull the engine just to make sure everything else is "proper". I pulled on it enough today that my arms are starting to look like Popeye's - don't really want to go through that again lol.

I'll pull it tomorrow and see if I can figure out the timing and will do a quick search to see how to lube the magneto.

Thanks again for all the help/advice here.
 

K-Tron

Registered
The magneto's only tend to need lubrication after they have sat for decades unused. If it turns smoothly, just add a little bit of sewing machine oil to the felt wick which rides on the eccentric which drives the points. I had an ABN which turned slowly and it ended up having rust between the armature of the magneto and the front and rear bushings. Some cleaning and re-lubricating and it turned normally. Pull the sparkplug and remove the belts. The engine should turn over very easily. Any tight spots, other than resistance from winding the impulse in the magneto would indicate sticky valves or perhaps a stuck piston ring.

Chris
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
So I played with it a little this afternoon. The spark plug was firing sporadically so I put a new D16 in and the spark is good now. I also pulled the carb and it was pretty funky inside so I ordered a carb kit and it should be in Monday. I'll probably follow K-Tron's advice and pull the engine just to make sure everything else is "proper". I pulled on it enough today that my arms are starting to look like Popeye's - don't really want to go through that again lol.

I'll pull it tomorrow and see if I can figure out the timing and will do a quick search to see how to lube the magneto.

Thanks again for all the help/advice here.
Can you hear the mag impulse click when you turn the engine over?
 
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