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High Opening Bid

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Mike Smith

Guest
Anyone here on Smokestack agree that making a high opening bid on an engine you place on Ebay is not just the same as putting a reserve on it ? As in the dude who just let us all know on Harry's here that he just listed a Butler Engine on Ebay with NO RESERVE. But BUT it has a opening bid of $2500 ! Now the question is ? Do we all feel that sence his $2500 is a opening bid, that it is not the same as a $2500 reserve ?????????
 
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John Hammink

Guest
Mike, I asked a seller what his reserve is and he won't tell me. A friend did the same and got words with him about that and he said: I block your name on eBay. So a seller that gives an opening bid is honest in my opinion. At first sight you could make your decision.

"Sixm" John
 
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leonard keifer

Guest
Technically speaking on ebay that's not a reserve, you pay extra for a reserve auction where the least you'll take is hidden. What this person is doing is telling you up front the least he'll take for his engine. If he doesn't get any takers maybe he'll relist at a lower opening bid.

I sometimes bid on reserve auctions on ebay but I'd much rather know up front the lister's minimum asking price.
 
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William Walter

Guest
I agree with John & Leonard, I am more apt to bid on an item if the starting bid is posted than if it has a reserve. I like to know where I stand. I like for everything to be "out in the open". When I sell something on E-bay, I never use a reserve.
 
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Vernon

Guest
To me it is the same as a reserve, (it serves the same funtion). The only differance is you know their reserve up front. Reserve, or opening bid, a turd by any name still stinks.
 
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Patrick Marsh

Guest
I see nothing wrong with a high opening bid. It tells you what the seller wants for HIS item. Remember the item BELONGS TO THE SELLER. Just because you would like to have it does not give you the right to whine about a high selling price “Reserve, or opening bid, a turd by any name still stinks.” I believe it is written in the bible “10. Thou shalt not covet any thing that is thy neighbour's.”
 
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Doug Kimball

Guest
I dislike unknown reserves. Don't mind posted start bids as long as not too high. I think in some ways the high start bid hurts the seller more than buyer... it seems to limit the number of bids ... bidders don't get sucked in by low start price and then catch the competition fever as price rises. I find myself seldom bidding on high starting price items and am very cautious on reserve price auctions as there can be a 'fever' to determine reserve then another to actually win the item. A little off topic but I also like PayPal ... instant payment without the hassle of getting m.o., envelope, stamp, slow mail, etc. or even longer with a check.
 
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jerry Fasano

Guest
I guess the real solution to this is if a Potential Bidder does not like the Opening Price or the fact that the item has a reserve on it they should simply move on and not Bid on the item.
 
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edurand

Guest
Guys:

I don't personally have a problem with a seller stating an opening bid price. I -do- personally dislike a hidden reserve because I don't want to waste my time bidding on something if I really didn't want to pay as much as the hidden reserve price for the item.

When I put stuff on Ebay, I post a starting bid price that reflects the minimum price I'd take to fool with collecting the money, packing, shipping, etc. If no one bids, then they are out nothing and I can either give the item to a friend or toss it as valueless.

That's my opinion and it's the result of 62 years of diligent development! ;-]

Take care - Elden (the old tightwad grouch)
 
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Al

Guest
I have used a reserve when selling an engine on ebay, but I have included the reserve price in the description. There are as many different auction variations with online or live auctions as there are poeple with opinions about the "right" way to do it. Reserves, start bids and premiums are always variables. The previous message says it all; if you are uncomfortable with the terms of the auction, pass it and go home. Respectfully,

Al
 
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David Greenwalt

Guest
I agree with you Mike, but it seems to be the accepted way of doing business on eBay. Personally, I don't care because I know what I want to pay for an item and it just lets me know whether or not I want to place a bid. When I asked this question a while back I was told by some that they didn't have a choice, they didn't want a reserve but eBay forced them to put an opening bid on it. That's ok, a rule is a rule and must be followed. But if you truely don't want a reserve then open the bid at a dollar (or whatever it takes to cover Ebay's expenses), don't place a high opening bid and then give me a bunch of crap about how you didn't have a choice. The seller has just as much choice on what his opening bid is as I do as to whether or not I want to bid on it. At least when I see an opening bid it does let me know if I want to bid on the item or not. It also lets me know what kind of person the seller is by the amount of the opening bid and lets me know if I would want to do business with him. Oh, by the way Mike, expect to get some e-mails calling you a whiner and complainer from those that misuse the system but need to justify themselves for doing so. David.
 
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Brent Wegher

Guest
Really does not make a difference. The auction puts the seller at a disadvantage because it reveals that he wants to get rid of something.

The buyer determines the auction sale price, not the seller.

If you went up to a neighbor who had something you wanted to buy then you the buyer are at a disadvantage and the seller determines the price.
 
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leonard keifer

Guest
Of course there's always the sleeze-ball (not an engine guy) who puts something on ebay with a very low bid price and no indication of shipping charges. Then you win the bid and he turns out to have a minimum shipping charge of $10 for an item that weighs 2 ounces or less. Yep, just happened to me; you can bet that guy won't be getting positive feedback from me.

Just blowing smoke!
 
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Doug Siembieda

Guest
The real issue here is stating "no reserve" and then putting any price above the cost of ebay services to list that item. It doesnt matter if you as a buyer would rather know up front the minimum a seller will take-it doesnt matter that as a seller you are protecting your investment, what matters is the deception ( some would say lie ) of calling it a " no reserve auction " when IT IS NOT! I've heard all the justifications for doing so- but it doesnt change the truth of the matter- and the truth is what really matters when money is changing hands.
 
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Bob (ND)

Guest
How about having a certain opening bid and stating "No HIDDEN Reserve"?
 
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Vernon

Guest
When I called it a turd, I wasn't refering to an opening bid, but was refering to the "no reserve" statement in the the title of the item, and then finding a large opening bid. That is a reserve no matter what you call it. If you want a reserve cool. If you want a large openning bid, cool. It's your item to do as you please. Just don't missrepresent the reserve. No "hidden reserve" is a lot more honest then "no reserve". I don't think it has anything to do with coveting as it does with missrepresenting something. Then again, how many people use Hit & miss in the title for things that clearly are not?
 
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John Rolli

Guest
I agree with Patrick 100%. I sell a bunch of stuff on ebay and always have a reserve but start the opening bid very low. As an example if I was selling a Briggs FI and wanted $400.00 for it I wouldnt start the bidding at $400.00 with no reserve as it would scare the hell out of people bidding because they would think the auction might go for far more than the engine is worth if a bidding war starts at the end and they might not get it. I look at it this way, this is the item I have for sale,im looking for xxxxxx amount for it,no less,so thats the reserve. If the bidding comes up to it great,if not too bad for me,if it goes higher thats even better! I dont feel guilty because someone wanted that engine so bad they bid $475.00 for it,supply and demand. Its my right as owner of my property.No one was forcing that person to make a bid. If I want something whether it has a reserve or not I will bid on it at the last few minutes of the auction if its not already higher than I want to go. Sure,I snipe. But guess what,if I dont win I dont get bent because I guess I really didnt want it that bad did I? Just my opinion. John.
 
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Denny Foster

Guest
Boy I wish I had saved the info on a watch my wife recently looked at on Ebay, I would love for ya'll to get a look at it. Nice vintage ladies wristwatch she was going to bid on, I think the high bid was around $55.00. Then she read the terms of the auction and the shipping was $199.00 thats right, she emailed the seller thinking a typo was made and low and behold the shipping on a wristwatch from the midwest US to any lower 48 was $199.00 Speaking of turds!!!
 
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Greg Ray

Guest
I certainly think so. I also feel that anyone that sells old iron on E-Bay is hurting the hobby. Why can't we sell on Enginads and have the seller and buyer work out a fair deal and give this hobby another good characteristic and keep the price within reason so that many more people will be able to enjoy the old iron hobby. Anyway, those are my feelings. Thanks for listening/reading and thank you Harry, Greg
 
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