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Honda EM6500 jumping time.

1936JDB

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Honda ES6500 jumping time.

Some local carpenters own an older ES6500 to use on jobsites before we get power on site. A few years ago I worked on it for them. They said it had been running fine, but died like you had shut off the key, and wouldn't restart. I noticed that it was sucking though the exhaust so I dis-assembled till I located the timing belt. It is a toothed automotive style belt, on toothed pulleys. The water pump drive acts as a tensioner, and isn't leaking. I re-timed it, and it has run fine till this week. I picked it up from a jobsite with the same story. Running fine, died, no restart. Found the same issue, re-timed, now runs fine. The water pump still looks fine, belt is tight, everything looks fine. So the question is, how does a toothed belt slip 180 degrees twice, for no apparent reason? Not that I mind the extra cash, but I'm darned curious.....:shrug:
 
Last edited:

Fred M.

Registered
1936JDB-

I think the engine would have stopped long before the slippage reached 180 degrees, so it may have happened all at once.

Is it possible one of the pulleys is slipping on its shaft?

Fred
 

1936JDB

Registered
And to add to the mystery.... There are two sets of timing marks on the cam pulley, one having a blue paint stripe. This time around when I opened it up, it was dead on the non-paint striped timing mark. I don't recall if it was like that the first time. Strange that it would jump directly to the unused timing mark. :eek: Maybe a sheered cam pulley key letting it spin? I didn't pay attention to how its put on while I had it apart. I guess I should have center punched the shaft and pulley while I was in there....

Edit.. I was typing while you were. It is the most logical explanation. And they use the eco throttle, so it is revving and idling often. So it isn't a constant load.
Does anyone know if it is keyed, splined, press fit, or just voodoo that holds the cam pulley to the shaft??
 

Motormowers

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Age
55
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Back when I worked at a Honda dealer we had some issues with a run of those engines having the cam screw at the sprocket loosen up and the engine jumping time from the cam sprocket key shearing or even breaking the end of the cam off. They had an updated cam kit that had the improved cam and sprocket that was held on with a large nut instead of that small screw that would loosen or break . If your cam sprocket is held on with a nut then the key is missing or the belt cogs are so worn its jumping time. These are the only issues I remember with that liquid cooled two cylinder engine, also used in HT3813 and HT 4313 tractors. Hope this helps.
 

robertathonda

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Motormowers has an excellent memory...the GX360 engine did get a service bulletin way back in 1988 that might be part of the problem:





-Robert@Honda
Caveat: I work for Honda, but the preceding is my opinion alone.
 

1936JDB

Registered
Thanks for the excelent information! My only questions are, I'm certain. I would have noticed the cam bolt being missing. Have you seen any break, but the bolt head stay in place? The generator has gone back, so I can't check it unless it happens again. And also, approximately what does the retro fit kit cost? Thanks again guys!!
 

robertathonda

Registered
And also, approximately what does the retro fit kit cost? Thanks again guys!!
The original camshaft and pulley were attached with a bolt. The new style pulley and camshaft connect with a nut, so if you're sure this is the problem, both the camshaft and pulley must be replaced at the same time.

Now I checked with my parts gal this morning, and both kits have been discontinued, however, you can get the individual parts (cam, pulley, nut):



Google the part numbers to find 'em online, or use this link to find a local Honda dealer; prices show above are MSRP.

Find A Honda Dealer

Finally, I would not wait too much longer if you need these parts. As the bulletin was issued 25 years ago, and that engine has been gone for a long, LONG time, the odds are very strong when the stock of these parts is sold out, they won't be re-ordered.

-Robert@Honda
Caveat: I work for Honda, but the preceding is my opinion alone.
 

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