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Houston, Stanwood & Gamble

DavidRaines

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/26/2019
Ran across a stationary steam engine in mid Missouri that was made by The Houston, Stanwood & Gamble Co., Cincinnati.
Has a 54" x 13" flywheel/pulley with a gardner governor.
Still sitting where it has since 1917.
Got a couple pictures with my IPAD but don't know how to upload from it yet. Will be seeing it again in a couple weeks so will take the digital camera and a good light.
I'm not a steamer guy so are these common engines?
Thanks.......Dave
 

Pete LaBelle

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/15/2013
Can you e-mail the picures from your Ipad to yourself ?

Ask a neighbor kid. They'll tell you how.

Looking forward to some pictures. Like was said before, any steam engine is worth saving.

Pete
 

PTraubert

eMail NOT Working
I saved a 12X16 side crank HSG engine from an East Texas sawmill site back in 2000. A lot of work for an engine that was all used up.

It was, I believe, well built with on notable exception. The crosshead wrist pin was clamped in the crosshead by a bolted split in the casting. Crosshead was broken at some pont in its operation and the piston let loose and busted out the cylinder head.

I went to a North Carolina auction around 2002 where there was a large 2cyl HSG with both crossheads busted in the same way. Cannot remember if the cylinders were damaged or not.

At any rate, any steam engine is worth preserving if at all possible.

Patrick
 

DavidRaines

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/26/2019
Sorry for the poor pictures as the engine is in a corner surrounded by some racks and the Ipad doesn't have a flash(at least I don't think it does).
It is sitting where it always has for ump-teen years.
Dave
 

Attachments

Jeff Smith

Registered
Last Subscription Date
08/05/2018
Like Mike McKnight, I have a soft spot for the stationary engines and I would drag that engine home.:D
 

gleaner

Registered
I have one just like it, also originated in Missouri. All steam engines in this day and age are worth saving. Get it dealt for and haul it home. It will be easy to set up as both crankshaft bearings are in the base casting so you won't have to set up an outboard bearing like other larger sized stationary engines.
 

Reeves13hp

Registered
Age
32
Last Subscription Date
04/22/2016
David
Glad to see the steam bug has bit you!!! that will look good with your
gas engine collection. let me know if you need help.
David jowett
 

PTraubert

eMail NOT Working
Yes, get it if at all possible. The self-contained ones are so much better than the outboard bearing kind. If you get a bore and stroke I may be able to come up with some catalog information.

Patrick
 

DavidRaines

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/26/2019
Patrick, the best I can determine, the stroke is 14.5 ". Don't know how to determine the bore. It is very hard to turn over. got it to move a little with another guys help.
Got a couple pics of the engine with my camera but can't upload til I get home.
The owner says he doesn't want to sell as long as he is alive.
Dave
 

PTraubert

eMail NOT Working
According to my undated catalog, these engines were a "Class A" designed for up to 100psig steam.

Based on your nominal 14" stroke, it crosses to a #28 10" X 14" engine rated at 35-40HP, 54" X 12" flywheel, 3700# engine weight.

Patrick
 

RPC14801

Registered
Age
22
I know this post is a few years old... I’ve licked up an old HSG steam engine, 12x16 cylinder. Missing the connecting rod and the crank side main bearing cap. Is there another out there someone could get pictures of the rod and some dimensions s I can make one? And possibly use the cap as a pattern for a new one...thanks
 
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