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HP rating

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Tom Winland

Guest
Can anyone give me the HP rating on a 7 1/2 by 9 portable Frick Eclipes

Thanks Tom Winland
 
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Andi

Guest
I think thats between 18 and 20 hp.Thats just going by what I've heard so I could be wrong.
 
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Paul Long

Guest
Using the "short rule" for finding HP; Multiply diameter of cylinder by itself and divide by 2.5. Answer is approximate horsepower. Formulas like this are given in the Audel, Hawkins, and ICS Textbooks. If your going to do any amount of work on steam, these old referances are invaluable.
 
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Tom Winland

Guest
Doesn't the length of the stroke make any difference in calculating the HP?

Thanks Tom Winland Ohio
 
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Paul Long

Guest
Yes it does. Thats why I gave you the "short rule". It gives "approximate" horsepower when other factors are not known. (it was one of the questions required for a Stationary Engineers license back in 1924) Other formulas to get exact output use bore, stroke, flywheel weight, RPM, steam pressure, and other factors. Your boiler operating pressure will not be known until thickness testing and a host of other checks are done, so at this time that may be as close to an approximate as you can get. These formulas were written back when the diameter of cylinder would have a "common" length stroke for its size. Hence the 2.5 factor. You'll find someone who knows the engine and how to fire will get more than the rated HP anyway. Someone who can't fire if his life depended on it, may only get 1/2 the rated HP. or put himself into orbit....
 
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harvey teal

Guest
Another short formula is HP=.000004 x Cyl Dia (inches) squared x Stroke (inches) x RPM x Mean Effective Pressure. MEP is dependent on several factors including the number of expansions. Figure that your class of engine, with, say,4 expansions and simple valving, will have a MEP approx 1/2 of the boiler pressure. Therefore if you were feeding this engine 100PSI, you would develop 10HP for each 100 RPM. If you double the speed, the HP will double. If you raise or lower the boiler pressure, the HP will raise or lower proportionately. This means that at 80 PSI, standard stationary practice of the day, and 200RPM, you would be producing 16HP.
 
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Allen

Guest
Your engine doesn't have the wood side sills, so it seems to be the smaller 4-15 HP type. Frick rated an 8x10 at 16HP back in the oughts, so I'm just just guesing - a 12, 13 or 15HP? At some point the Frick Company dispensed with horsepower ratings and just advertised engines by the size of their cylinders.

This page will give you a year if you have a S/N http://users.andassoc.com/shelor/steam/GeiserandFrick.htm
 
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peter

Guest
Frick Information, your lucky day

You might contact (I suggest membership) Frick Engine Club PO Box 220 Climax NC 27233

They offer excellent catalog reprints from 1884 to 1912 or later. Member is somewhere in the 10.00 year range and the reprints are around 5.00 each.

Castings and drawings are also available for the parts. YES! you can still buy parts, cast from the origional patterns!

Frick is a special case, where all the info and parts are available. All sales records survive. Members can learn to whom and when thier engine was sold.

cheers peter
 
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