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Humphrey & Sons, Bone Grinder / Mill / Slicer

Peter

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/14/2013
I pickup up this nicely painted Humphrey and Sons, bone grinder. I prefer not to paint my old stuff, but if you are going to do it, this is the way. The Humphry was made in Joilet Illinois. I have not seen a Humphrey mill only Mann(sp?). Looks interesting, with a hand wheel to feed the bone while cranking. Ornate looking. I have yet to do a Google.

I would like to see other examples or learn more of the history and rarity of this maker and model.
 

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Jebaroni

Registered
Age
40
Never heard of one of them, but I like it! Nice find! I wouldn't mind having a bone grinder some day just for the shock factor!
 

midpw

Registered
Age
64
Last Subscription Date
10/01/2018
That is a really nice unit........

I haven't seen that brand before either. A good friend has a Mann bone grinder that he displays at the fair. I love the look on Mom's face when I tell her kid(s) what it was used for. Priceless :D

Bruce
 

Charlie Bryant

In Memory Of
Age
92
Last Subscription Date
Memorial
I have one that I bought several years ago in Missouri. I believe the correct nomenclature is "bone cutter". They actually cut the bone not grind it.

I was at a show in MO in 1994. A gal asked me where I got my bones. Well I said remember last year during the flood there were several caskets washed a way and were not found. I found some of these and thats where I got my bones. She said oh my gosh your cutting up my Grand Mother's bones. She went on to explain they never found her Grand Mother's casket. I didn't give any more silly answers that day.
 

Jebaroni

Registered
Age
40
I have also heard them referred to as bone "slicers" or "shavers" as wet (green) bones cannot be "ground". According to Wendel, Enterprise did make a dry bone grinder, but all the rest were cutters/shavers. Funny how no one seems to know anything about how you actually added the "meaty" shaved bones into a meal product that chickens will actually eat. I could see them eating a dry bone powder much more easily than in a wet meal form.
 

Charlie Bryant

In Memory Of
Age
92
Last Subscription Date
Memorial
I just looked at my Humprey bone cutter. On the hopper is a letter 3. Then below that is PAT JULY 3 1900 CANADA PATENDED 1901. On the crank wheel HUMPREY & SONS JULIET ILL.

Now I don't know if Humprey & Sons were the manufacturer or just the sales distributor. I have never seen another one like these that Peter and I have at any of the shows, swap meets and auctions that I have been to the past 20 years. Have seen quite a few of the ones made by the Gould Co. in NY.

Cut bones were fed to hens so they wouldn't lay soft shelled eggs and pick at each other. Cut bones were replaced with oyster shells which have since been replaced with other supplements in the grain.
 

midpw

Registered
Age
64
Last Subscription Date
10/01/2018
I just bought my Christmas present for myself. It is an original booklet printed by the F.W. Mann Co., Milford Mass. titled "The Paying Hen"

Apparently I own a model 7 that was designed to service from 40 to 100 hens. Sure wish it was belt driven, but maybe not. These are a gruesome machine for sure..............

It completely describes their various models and operation techniques. It goes on to discuss the 'why' of cutting raw bones for chicken feed supplement. I'll scan it here shortly and post it up in a photobucket album......after I open it Christmas morning. :rolleyes:

Bruce
 
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