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I'm lookin to get this motor appraised and identified any help greatly appreciated

FWurth

One Millionth Post
Last Subscription Date
07/29/2019
Is this a model? It looks to be in a display cabinet?
 

OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Beautiful looking model !:cool:

I can understand maybe wanting an appraised value for insurance purposes, but if you're just looking to see what you can get out of it I'd say GIVE IT BACK to your Great-Grandfather so he can give it to someone else who will cherish it like he did.

I have one of the little Stuart Steam Engines that my Grandfather built and It's Not For Sale At Any Price.

If you're looking to get rid of it then he obviously gave it to the wrong person !

Sorry for being so Blunt, but that kind of struck a nerve with me.

:confused:
 

DavidRaines

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/26/2019
Otto, would guess being g-Grandfather that he has passed. Probably part of his estate so can't give back. To some kids they don't care anything about engines, which I understand. Have a son that doesn't care anything about them.
I don't know anyone qualified to speak to the value, perhaps an auctioneer. You could advertise on here for best offer.
 

Bryant

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
06/15/2020
It is a model of an international famous. I think they were sold in gas engine magazine a number of years ago. I would be interested in when you are ready to sell it.
 

Jon Rozevink

Engine Buyer
Last Subscription Date
02/10/2020
Assuming your model is actually in good shape you'll probably be able to get around $2,000 +- for it. You might be able to get more if you could take a video of it running and ship it. Those are tricky things to do correctly if you're not experienced with those sort of things. A more valuable one like it might be on the correct cart and might also have a clutch pulley.

As far as I know it is not a sin to sell an engine that was inherited... It would be an awful burden to collectors if all families were expected keep their forefathers engines. Engines could only get sold if there were no living relatives?? lol
 

Craig A

Moderator
Staff member
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2015
Different strokes for different folks.
If nobody sold anything nobody would HAVE anything.
 

Archaeometrist

Registered
I have a different take.

When a relative died (a person we cared about), one of the family members wanted everything that was of value... "if it is worthless or not worth selling, you can have it." If it had value, it was to be sold so that person could get the money (That's almost a direct quote).

Long story, but the relative died, a lot of my stuff was stored at the house - and a big chunk of it was sold by the 'family member', who pocketed the money. I was able to rescue two antique Briggs-type motors of mine at the last second - they were being dragged to the scrappers when I saw them and pulled them out (and got treated to a lot of angry yelling, even though I had proof they were mine). The "Family Member" had a fit... even though that person would have only gotten a couple of dollars maximum for them. (I was even accused of being a thief and regularly denounced as such afterward.)

So I am VERY hostile to the "sell it ASAP!" crowd. That sort of thinking caused us a lot of harm. (I understand if the person is in a bad way, but based on our experiences, it's the ones WITH money who want every penny they can get.)

I would say: "If your Grandfather meant much to you, hold onto it - you will regret selling it. If he didn't and he DID mean much to someone else in the family, let that person have it with the understanding that it wasn't to be sold and kept in the family. Don't just think about those almighty dollar signs, unless you're close to doing without food or something like that!"
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
If you do sell it, you must be very careful with shipping it! There are many delicate parts, and rough handling will destroy it in a hurry if not properly packed. In all probability, local pick up would be best to prevent damage.

What condition is it in? Running, stuck (IF SO DO NOT FORCE ANYTHING!, free but not running, gummed up fuel system (stale gas in tank), or was it just a shelf pet? As I mentioned before, there are a lot of delicate parts on that engine. If something is stuck, it can break in an instant!:eek:

Bryant is correct, these were sold in GEM for several years, both as finished engines and as casting kits, I believe in the 1990s I will look in my back issues and see if I can find the actual builder.
Andrew
 

Bill Hazzard

Registered
Last Subscription Date
08/28/2008
I have a different take.

When a relative died (a person we cared about), one of the family members wanted everything that was of value... "if it is worthless or not worth selling, you can have it." If it had value, it was to be sold so that person could get the money (That's almost a direct quote).

Long story, but the relative died, a lot of my stuff was stored at the house - and a big chunk of it was sold by the 'family member', who pocketed the money. I was able to rescue two antique Briggs-type motors of mine at the last second - they were being dragged to the scrappers when I saw them and pulled them out (and got treated to a lot of angry yelling, even though I had proof they were mine). The "Family Member" had a fit... even though that person would have only gotten a couple of dollars maximum for them. (I was even accused of being a thief and regularly denounced as such afterward.)

So I am VERY hostile to the "sell it ASAP!" crowd. That sort of thinking caused us a lot of harm. (I understand if the person is in a bad way, but based on our experiences, it's the ones WITH money who want every penny they can get.)

I would say: "If your Grandfather meant much to you, hold onto it - you will regret selling it. If he didn't and he DID mean much to someone else in the family, let that person have it with the understanding that it wasn't to be sold and kept in the family. Don't just think about those almighty dollar signs, unless you're close to doing without food or something like that!"

Maybe it would have been a better idea to not leave your stuff at someone else's place.
 

Archaeometrist

Registered
Maybe it would have been a better idea to not leave your stuff at someone else's place.
You're right, but hindsight is always better than foresight - if you have a choice (life isn't always that simple). I regret it now, even though the situation was... complex and I really didn't have much say in it.

I've also been learning that I cannot trust people - especially the ones people say I have to trust (and when people say I have to trust, to not trust them either). I also have learned to be VERY careful about letting other people borrow my stuff or loaning anything out. Painful lessons (that people, especially the ones who prattle about how "good" they are, really aren't). :(
 

G.M.Johnson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/05/8018
Man tough crowd here! Theres one Tool that won't be back! God, I've never seen so much bickering and getting off track about a poor guy just wanting to know how much his motor is worth! So he wants to sell it, so what get over it! And yes I said "Motor"! :wave:
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
In the spirit of the fun of staying off topic :D "Motor" is what they were called originally, so far as I can tell. Motorcycle. Motorcar. Etc. But they are indeed engines. Heat engines. So either is correct. I call them engines simply because that's what I first learned. If it was wrong, I would change.

I'd like to call them motors, since I always prefer original terminology, but then I visualize electric motors.

Much worse is calling a generator a "head", or an armature that doesn't move a "stator" or a field that does move a "rotor" or a *really* bad one- 120/240 volts single phase as "120-0-120" :crazy:

I strongly agree with sentiment, but I certainly see the valididty of the arguments in favor of selling as well. I have a largely original NEVER RESTORED 1931 Ford Model A that my Great Grandfather bought in 1941. There's NO WAY I would sell it, and I never even met my great grandfather as he died nearly twenty years before I was born.

My dumbass sister would destroy it by putting a stupid *chevy 350* in it, making it like every single other car on the road. So, no, someone else can have it after I'm Gone lol.

Keith
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
Engine originally built by M&E Machine products. Still available as a casting kit by Peerless Machine.
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Age
60
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
There are a lot of assumptions made by us (all of us) when someone says "I was left this and want to know the value in order to sell it".

I've dealt with numerous estates in my life and in many cases the "seller" is required to do certain things. Did the grandfather leave it to the gentleman who asked the question and another person and he wants to know the value in order to sell his portion to the other individual? Did the grandfather leave the model to him with the instructions that it was to be sold with 1/2 the funds to be given to the grandson and the other half going to the cemetery where the grandfather is buried? There are thousands of other potential scenarios. I learned a long time ago not to condemn or chastise someone without knowing all the details.

Lastly, the grandfather may have left it to the grandson with no strings attached. We don't know the details on that situation either. Does the grandson have a family member with medical issues and needs funds? Does the grandson have a child headed to college and the sale of the engine will be what’s needed to assist that effort? Again, we don't know and it’s actually none of our business.

Its the grandson's to do as he pleases just as all the old iron in my shed is there for me to do as I please: sell it, give it away, trade it and on and on.......just my 2 cents and we all have different opinions which are welcome....
 

JeffK

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/09/2020
Craig is correct. [ if nobody sold anything nobody would have anything]
I bought this steam boat from the original owner with the original blueprints
He saved his paper route money to buy it and build it. He was happy to sell it to me for $75.00 because he knew no one in his family had an interest in it
 

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OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Wise Words by LCJudge, and True, we don't know all the circumstances behind it.

As for "The Other Side of the Coin" with the line "if nobody sold anything nobody else would have anything", that's a somewhat misguided statement as the Vast Majority of what WE COLLECT has changed hands numerous times over the decades with the original owners getting rid of it because it was just an old worn-out piece of equipment worth little more (or less) than scrap value which then went on to be traded and/or sold a couple/few more times.

Big Difference between that and something that was built by or bought new by someone that cared enough for it to hang on it and then pass it down to the next generation in their family generally with the intent to Keep it in the Family.

Every once in a while someone is able to buy something after years and years of trying when it "wasn't for sale at any price", but eventually it gets to the point where no-one in the family has any interest in it any more and it goes, but there is still something to be said for KEEPING Family Heirlooms, whatever they may be, just to honor those that left it to you if for no other reason.

JeffK was fortunate enough to be at the right place at the right time and get his Steam Boat and blueprints From the Original Owner who knew no-one in the family wanted it. I have no problem with that, Nor would I have had a problem with the opening post if it stated he was helping to settle his grandfathers Estate and needed help determining the value.

But when I read : ""I was given this motor by my great-grandfather .... and eventually want to sell it"", I can't help but think the great-grandfather would have rather given it to someone that would appreciate it better. . . But again, after reading the wise words of LCJudge, I/We don't know all the circumstances.

:salute:
 

Harry

Administrator
Staff member
And another thought to consider. Much the same as on Craigs List or eBay, maybe the engine is hot or it's only a photograph from the internet. Always buy with your head screwed on straight and don't allow yourself to be scammed or put into a bad situation because you want it quick and cheap.
 

Jon Rozevink

Engine Buyer
Last Subscription Date
02/10/2020
And another thought to consider. Much the same as on Craigs List or eBay, maybe the engine is hot or it's only a photograph from the internet. Always buy with your head screwed on straight and don't allow yourself to be scammed or put into a bad situation because you want it quick and cheap.
Maybe Harry knows something about the poster?? My scam radar didn't go off when I saw it...

If someone does ever suspect they are being sold something from a picture from the internet there is a way to do a image search on Google. I think it may be called a reverse image search, you upload the picture and then it will attempt to find that image on other sites. I'm not sure how accurate it is but it has worked for me several times. It also works if your buddy sends you an pic of someone they're "seeing" and you want to figure out if it's a random internet picture. :D
 
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