Independent Boiler Codes

LAKnox

New member
First off, let me say that my purpose in creating this thread is to help to stir =meaningful= discussion and if the thread dissolves into argument, I ask the moderator, in advance, to lock it.

In reading all the threads here regarding various codes, it occurred to me that, for =our= purposes (i.e. historic boiler preservation and new boiler replacement for historic machinery), an independent, non-governmental set of codes might be appropriate. In the long run, the people these codes are meant to please are the insurance companies and their lawyers. (Note: I didn't say "protect"; I said "please".) Does anyone really disagree that, in the end, it's the =liability= that's the issue? I propose that an independent board be set up, along the lines of Underwriter's Labs, to set forth a uniform set of boiler codes that would be valid in all 50 states, and with what variations necessary, for all of Canada as well. This code would be written =specifically= for historic boilers and their new replacements and use modern, scientific methods for calculating safe operating pressures and conditions. As most of us agree (with some vocal dissenters), a boiler should be allowed to stand on its own merits until such time as the boiler's owner decides that they don't want to operate it at much-reduced pressures or it becomes unsafe at any pressure. Is it realistic to believe that a =uniform= and indpendent set of regulations could be written that would satisfy the insurance companies =outside= the government or is this just a pipe dream?

Lyle

Lyle...Craig here...while I TRY and keep a CLOSE watch on the forums I moderate sometimes I depend on messages when something goes awry...should this thread head that direction please let me know.........;)
 
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Mark L. Jordan

New member
Working on it..........

Not independent, but rather appropriate codes are what is needed. Fitting an antique boiler into today's standard codes is a square peg into a round hole. Each jurisdiction has it's own methodology, and I've realized that changing each is neary impossible. What is possible, and is being addressed, is a way to "grease" the antiques and the existing codes such that they fit better. This is what Ohio and some other states have done, and there is no reason that a STEAM PRESERVATION STANDARD cannot be written so that owners and inspectors and repairmen can understand what is required.

Mark J.:)
 

Chuck Sindelar

In Memory Of
Working on it..........

Not independent, but rather appropriate codes are what is needed. Fitting an antique boiler into today's standard codes is a square peg into a round hole. Each jurisdiction has it's own methodology, and I've realized that changing each is neary impossible. What is possible, and is being addressed, is a way to "grease" the antiques and the existing codes such that they fit better. This is what Ohio and some other states have done, and there is no reason that a STEAM PRESERVATION STANDARD cannot be written so that owners and inspectors and repairmen can understand what is required.

Mark J.:)
It would seem to me that it would be preety straight forward to write a steam preservation standard that owners and repairmen could understand--but that is about where it would end. The inspectors hands are tied/bound to enforce the rules in the jurisdiction he represents. Each jurisdiction already has its own set of standards. It is not realistic to believe that all of these seperate jusisdictions will agree to change their present set of standards, let alone all jurisdictions agree to accept the same set. That will happen just after there is peace on earth between all men. Maybe in heaven, but not on earth.
chuck
 
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