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International Harvester/ Lineshaft Machine Enthusiast

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Hi! I'm a lifelong mechanic and International Harvester truck collector who has stumbled onto your site. I live in Central California, south of Fresno. Old stuff is still spilling out of hiding places, here. It's wonderful!
About two years ago I jumped in with both feet into the world of lineshafts and ancient machine tools. I found out pretty quickly that the old machines are easier to find then the antique lineshafts, hangers and pulleys.
I am a complete newcomer to setting up and machining with 100 year old tools. Any help is very welcome. I've put up lineshafts in my shop but for now they are just for display. Thank goodness most old machines got converted to electric motors long ago. I want to use them ASAP.
I do have a very specific skill: I've done automotive and light truck emissions testing and repair for 30 years. Don't hesitate to ask me a smog question if you have one.
Thanks, Monsonmotors
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
These first two are from the estate of Vernon Conrad, Fresno County Supervisor.
He was a farmer and a lot more. Looks like he could do anything. I purchased them and a Weaver mechanical two-station press from his estate last summer.

3. This belt-drive swing saw is pretty cool. I'll have to reinforce the ceiling in order to hang it. The old wood and fasteners have to go for safety's sake.
I like your shop. Very inviting!
Unfortunately, I know little about machining with or without antique machines.
I'm hoping you folks will set me right.

4. Weaver mechanical press, center. KR Wilson belt drive linebore stand, to the right.
I'm about 2/3rds into the line shaft shop transformation. Another year to go.
 

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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
1. I looked at a hundred pictures of these things, now it’s time to put my lineshafts up. This shaft came from Southern California and the hangers from Maine.

2. My old lathe being put on skis to come home.

3. This electric motor came from a Fresno, CA auction. This is a huge old “induction motor” from a lineshaft Shop. It came with two pulleys. It has it’s original adjustable bed.
 

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Craig A

Moderator
Staff member
Age
68
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2015
Welcome to STAK...…. :)

I'm moving this thread to the Antique Machine Tools forum......a more appropriate forum for your line shaft discussion.
In keeping with the theme of your thread this is my grandfather who founded our three generation machine shop in 1938.
He's standing at the new South Bend lathe he bought and you can see the forward/reverse clutch lever, just to the right of the light bulb, which hung from the line shaft which ran the lathe and some other machinery.
 

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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Craig, like so many people out there, my grandfather was a machinist, too. I never got to meet him. It must be in my blood, though.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
This item was a “no sale” at a recent antique automotive auction near Fresno, CA. Luckily for me a local man bought it to save it from the dump and then I got it from him. I think it’s crazy cool.
It’s how you rebored cylinders 100 years or more ago, I think. Big wooden box. No power attachments.
 

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I like oldstuff

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/09/2015
Love the string of lights.
Being a codger of sorts I remember a Milwaukee area machine shop in the 70's that was truly old world. Started around the 19zeros it was all line shaft and had about 37 watts of lighting in the whole place. But man, they knew how to fixture and repair anything. The thing I liked about it was how quiet the place was. Only the click click of the belt joints was heard with maybe five machines running.

They made it past that 19th century mindset and now are a first rate operation. https://www.buschprecision.com/Busch-Precision.htm

edit: During high school summers I worked a couple blocks away for a machine shop/tool and die operation. Occasionally I'd have to take a part of perhaps a 1950's turret lathe to them for rebuilding. Later working for a bus company I used them for a vendor to take Ford and International beam axles to for straightening and kingpin re bushing.
 
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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Rain is finally coming to Central CA. I had to finally move everything indoors.
My old lathe turns out to be a Sebastian. A “utility” lathe. The other lathe is a Bardons and Oliver. I think the old drill press might be a Champion. Let me know if I’m wrong.
I went from zero old machine tools to six or more in just a few months.
 

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Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
I have no experiences like yours, darn it. Just more modern automotive machine shops. No line shafts. I’m flying by the seat of my pants. This old stuff sure is fun, though. I hope to turn out something useful when I get it all set up.
 

cornbinder89

Registered
MM, glad to see you over here, and you are missed on the other site. I have the same lathe you have in post #5, but mine was missing the motor/pulley bracket that yours has vertically over the lathe bed. Now I know what to look for.
Do you have a complete set of gears for the lead-screw? I have many, but not sure I have a full set.
Hope the fires/ smoke aren't near.
Take care- Geoff
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
Hi, CB!
I was hoping I'd run into you, again. This is perfect, you can tell me how to operate this lathe. You could put all of what I know about old machine tools into a thimble.
The shop that it came from only used it to cut driveshafts. I'll use it for that, too.
The best thing about it is that is is operable right now, as is. Just plug it in.
It only came with a few things. I'll photograph what there is and post it.
You would not believe the negotiations that took place in order for me to secure this old lathe. Two longtime business partners had broken up with bitterness, the lathe had resided in their shop for 20 years. A third man actually owned the lathe. None of the above wished to part with it. I schmoozed for years to get it. The real owner asked to buy it back immediately after the sale. Sheesh.
I miss the IHC website. I just wasn't fitting in very well, though.
I need all the help I can get on these machines. Please feel free to set me straight, CB. :)
I just realized that my old 2x4" rafters won't support the old lineshafts. The neighbor recently moved in a old house on I beams. I made a deal to buy the I beams as the cross beams to support the lineshafts. I have plenty of oak for posts.
The included picture came from my hometown of San Dimas, CA. I am striving for a similar look, but with a cement floor. :)
 

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cornbinder89

Registered
We're just about in the same "thimble" I'm no machinist but love to fool around with it.
On left front, the lever is the lead screw control, forward, reverse and neutral. Left rear is the back gear, for turning the chuck at real slow speeds for knurling and the like. There is a pin that connects the main gear to the chuck that has to be in the "out position" for the back gear to be used, otherwise it locks the shaft like putting a transmission in two gears at once. With the shaft locked, you can remove and replace the chuck.
The exposed gears on the left set the lead screw speed relative to chuck speed. A wide selection is needed to cut thread forms and for different feed rates depending on what you are cutting.
There is on mine anyway, a moveable stubshaft that you install different gears to vary the lead screw rate. If all they did was cut driveshaft tubes, I suspect the gears went missing. I don't know if I have a full set either.
Mine is in pieces as I dis assembled when I moved here and haven't re assembled as I don't have a concrete floor to set it up on.
I am interested in the motor and pulley mount you have as mine was missing and my grandfather (who had it before me) had cobbled something together.
My lathe, and I suspect yours, has plain bearings made of brass, so you are limited on how much side force they can carry. You can't be too aggressive with your cuts, and carbides generally take a fair bit of force to cut, so you will be limited to tool steel cutting tools.
Modern lathes have a set of levers and all the lead screw gears are carried internally.
Even with all it limitations, it can be a good lathe to learn on. The satisfaction of turning down a shaft to fit something, no matter how long it took, doing it yourself is something I'll never miss.
I'm sure others here will have more guidance
 

cornbinder89

Registered
So it bolts between the lathe bed and the legs? I have the drive pulley for the flat belt. so that part is ok.
One thing about a flat belt, if you try and put too much force on the cutting tool the belt will let you know you are being too aggressive!
 
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