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International McCormick 10" Early Type D Burr Mill

Mike Paul

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/12/2020
It's rusty, but it's mine. Picked it up today in a little horse trading. Used as a lawn ornament for as long as anyone could remember. Fortunately, somebody caulked a piece of Plexiglas over the twin cutters so they were protected. Unfortunately the hopper is pretty much toast but that shouldn't be too serious to replace. Hopefully somebody on here has done as much and has a set of drawings or is able to fabricate one. Castings are all sound with no evidence of cracks or welds. Also got a McD single hole corn sheller, (missing the feed tray) in the deal.
 

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Jebaroni

Registered
Age
40
I had to recreate the hopper for an IHC 8" Type B, but it has a different hopper. Thankfully, the Type D that you have had the smallest/simplest hopper of the 3 styles. The only difficult part, really, was rolling the edge along the top and figuring out how to do the little crimp at the bottom where it joins the frame castings. Anyone with a CAD drafting software could draw up some patterns for you from measurements and most any HVAC shop that does their own sheet metal could cut out the parts for you. A water jet machine is what you want since most places aren't really working with the old fashioned sheet metal shears anymore. If you were closer, I'd be happy to work with you. Should be able to get the parts made for around $75.

Here are some pictures of what I did on mine.

Jeb
 

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Mike Paul

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/12/2020
I have friends with shears, brakes and water jet machines so I guess that's where I'll start. Or finish. I'll probably start with getting everything freed up and getting the working surfaces rust free. The before and after pictures are encouraging.
 

Jebaroni

Registered
Age
40
I rolled the top edge on my hopper using a piece of full length 3/8" bar and some of the wide, flat, "duck-billed" Vice Grip pliers to help clamp it to the edge of the sheet metal where the corner pieces would end up (so there was metal sticking out beyond the round bar). I had previously made a mark and used a brake press to bend a 90 degree fold in the sheet metal, which was as far as our machine could bend. I used the round bar as a die and (once it was clamped in place) hammered against it like an anvil to roll the remaining flange over the round bar. Once the roll was complete, I could slide the bar out. I already had the 4 corners pieces made from the same diameter bar and I inserted them prior to spot welding the hopper together. It sounds more complicated in writing than it was in practice. Anybody familiar with sheet metal should be able to knock it out easily. Good luck...please post pictures!

On my machine, a tree had fallen on it at some point in time. Several broken castings and bent iron parts. Anything is salvageable!

---------- Post added at 07:23:48 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:21:37 PM ----------

By the way, I believe that the oiled bearings (no grease cups) places your machine as being made sometime prior to 1923 or thereabouts.
 

Mike Paul

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/12/2020
It took a little research to realize that the style with the extended base and frame and the "horseshoe" adjusting handle was a later version of the D and not a different model altogether. Unfortunately, I was really after a regular mill as opposed to this cob grinder. My available engines top out at 3HP so that might relegate to trading bait for something more practical. We'll see.
 

Jebaroni

Registered
Age
40
But remember that any tractor with a belt pulley will easily handle it, even a Farmall Cub. The 10" size also requires a little more horsepower, but again, we're talking probably 10hp at full capacity. If you happen to head to any shows in the south, they usually bring a little more money when sold down here. Up to you, but they are good machines and fun to demonstrate, regardless.

Jeb
 

Jim Walker

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/25/2019
Mike,
I see you live near Jason Dahm, I would be willing to send my hopper back with him from Le Sueur Swap Meet for you to make a new one. The only cost to you would be UPS charges sending it back to me. If you plan on coming to Le Sueur you can pick it up. I work the main gate the first three days. Notice on Jebs the third bearing frame/holder. With Jebs guidance I reconstructed one just like yours. If you want pictures of my setup provide your email. If you feed the grinder with caution you can get by with the three horse engine. If it is for shows it makes a neat display. We are fortunate to have Jeb and his knowledge on SmokStak.
Jim Walker
 

Mike Paul

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/12/2020
You're right about Jeb. I've plowed through old posts on here for recreation and he's certainly offered up a ton of useful information. And Jason, I know him well. As you can see by my profile picture I'm an auctioneer and Jason swings by when I have things that interest him. I truly appreciate the offer to supply a pattern hopper but I've got a fabricator close by that can make one for me off the existing hopper. Which reminds me, what is the strip of wood for on the hopper? It seems like somebody else asked that same question but I couldn't find it again.
 

Jebaroni

Registered
Age
40
I believe it was used to give the sacking elevator bracing something to clamp against. The upper brace was slotted and the wood gave a little more friction and had better holding power than straight metal-on-metal. At least, that's my take on it. There was a short, sacking elevator that clamped to the front of the hopper, but also a taller wagon box elevator that did not clamp to the hopper. The wagon box elevator had legs to support it because it was so tall (usually around 10-12 feet long).
 

Mike Paul

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/12/2020
Well, it's been at least two years with exactly Zero progress so off to the auction she goes.
 

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