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Issues with F-150 10speed transmission

Tom Wahl

Registered
I think Ford invested in the Rivian? "spelling" .That seems to be 1 strong truck if the specs are true.
I just read an article that said Rivian has hired Tesla staff to build its charging network. All electric vehicles should be able to use the Tesla Supercharger network.
 

uglyblue66

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/07/2018
I just read an article that said Rivian has hired Tesla staff to build its charging network. All electric vehicles should be able to use the Tesla Supercharger network.
For electric to ever be practical,yes,the chargers need to be universal,just as the gas nozzles are.
 

J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
I thought electric would have battery packs that would roll in, like a rechargeable drill, stop at a station and switch out for a charged pack and move on. Batteries would have to be owned and maintained by the service companies. You could go cross country just like a gas vehicle.
 

nblack

Registered
For electric to ever be practical,yes,the chargers need to be universal,just as the gas nozzles are.
I agree. We also would need to be able to "fill" an electric as quickly as an equivalent petrol vehicle, and we need to have as many people knowledgeable of their platforms as much as our petrol vehs. If an electric stops, What are the odds that a tow-truck is going to be involved, versus a gasser with a bad u-joint, or wheel bearing, or minor electrical problem?(meaning a roadside repair) (spoken from the standpoint of someone who has helped with many roadside repairs over the last several decades). On the other side of the coin, I must admit that MOST vehicles made today are not really made to be "serviceable", and this annoys me greatly. As has been already noted, the automotive Manufacturers are worshiping at the altar of fuel economy, and the end result for us as consumers is that we are getting screwed. As Scotty famously said to Captain Kirk, "ya canna 'change the laws of physics, Capt'n". Lighter equipment cannot do the job of it's heavier counterparts for the long term. It might for a while, but then we are spending our most valuable resource (time) to either earn $$ to pay for parts/ service. (and this is ASSUMING that parts are STILL available), or struggling how to fix it ourselves. I for one, believe that we passed the apex of vehicle manufacturing several years back.
Efficiency is NOT a measure of how much energy X, Y,Z consumes. It is a measure of how LONG it lasts, how EASY it is to fix, and how RELIABLE it is. Switch mode power supplies carry a number of different ratings, and one is "MTBF" meaning -mean time before failure". The higher the rating, (usually in hours) (kinda like an LED light bulb) the longer expected service life.
 

J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
The first hybrid I looked at had a warning on the battery "This will kill you", kinda gets your attention. As far as roadside service goes, I tell people if I don't have my scan tool all I can do is give you a ride. Used to be able to look in the carb, see if it's getting gas, pull a wire and see if you're getting fire. Can't see anything now.
 
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