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Junk yard model engine build

Dustin D Ehli

Subscriber
Age
35
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
So.
We are going to attempt to build an engine this winter from junk yard items we have been collecting for a while.

Couple things to consider,
1, we don't know what we are doing.
2. This will be a slow build, weekends here and there when we have time.

Our plan is to build as many things as possible/ use as little pre made items as feasable.

Not sure if it will be hot and miss or what yet, we are gonna work on the rotating assembly first.

Any tips and tricks along the way will be appreciated, this will be fly by wire type of thing.

---------- Post added at 08:07 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:59 PM ----------

Here we are facing and drilling the valve handles we are gonna use for flywheels.
Our plan is to machine a counterbore to accept a weld hub, then drill holes through the flywheel hub and into the weld hubs, thread the holes in the weld hubs and bolt on the flywheels. This way we will have a nice hub with keyway and setscrews to mount the flywheels.

I should mention all we have is the lathe, no mill so we are limited to drill press and lathe
 

s100

Registered
That sounds like a fun project, and one I have contemplated myself in the past (but never got to). I think I can offer one bit of advice based on what I have learned over the years, embarking cross country without a map on one ill-considered project or another. Things will be MUCH easer and progress far more smoothly if you scrounge all your materials then develop a comprehensive set of plans BEFORE you start cutting metal. I know, this is frustrating and flies in the face of doing an impromptu project, and denies you the immediate feedback of actually doing cool things right away, but in the end you will be glad you waited. Just my dos pesos...

Good luck with your project, and keep us posted!
 

Dustin D Ehli

Subscriber
Age
35
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
We are no trying to make it look like any brand, or even to make it look that good, just wanna see if we assemble a pile of parts into a working engine.
Like I said not sure if it will be hit miss, or throttled, what we are gonna do for a governor, etc.

Does anyone know a safe max speed for 12 inch cast iron 6 spoke valve handles?
They seem pretty beefy
 

Gasenginegangster

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/03/2019
I am looking forward to see what you come up with. Thanks so much for sharing your progress on your project engine. Looks like fun.
 

Dustin D Ehli

Subscriber
Age
35
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
Thanks everyone, last few updates for probably a few weeks.
Drilling the crankshaft webs, we tack welded them together during this operation.
Next prep for welding.
Next center drilling the crank.
Finally, after cutting out the throw area, it's actually pretty straight.
Ends will be trimmed after the build
 

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wagswitte

Registered
Last Subscription Date
04/17/2014
Looking forward to your progress keep posting pic's always nice to see what someone is doing.
 

Dustin D Ehli

Subscriber
Age
35
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
Some things that we are gonna use are.
Rod from an Ihc 2.5 la
Piston from a Wisconsin engine
Our cylinder is gonna start as hydraulic cylinder tubing.
Here is a pic of some of the parts.
 

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Dustin D Ehli

Subscriber
Age
35
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
So probably wont do much till thanksgiving weekend again.
next task is to machine the counterbore in the flywheel hubs, and then drill and thread holes to bold them to the weld hubs.

We have a 2.5 bore, after some quick discussion we went with a 3.5 stroke, knowing that we will have interference with the rod and the back of the cylinder. Our plan is to either lengthen the rod, or notch the back of the cylinder for rod clearance, or a combination of both.
After we get a main frame made and the crankshaft mounted we can mock fit the cylinder and decide which route to go.

still discussing the head, we have about 4 to 6 ideas, some contemporary, some radical. all will require some thought and a lot of work. we will probably tackle that after we get the rotating assembly together and working.
 

Amax

Registered
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2016
It is really clever the way you are building this. Well done.
 

Dustin D Ehli

Subscriber
Age
35
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
also.
we plan to try and get it to run, only then will we worry about cooling, some lubrication issues, and possibly adding counterweight to the crankshaft.

IF :O it ever runs we probably will just fabricate some kind of sheet metal water hopper around the cylinder for cooling, and probably leave the head dry
 
Does anyone know a safe max speed for 12 inch cast iron 6 spoke valve handles?
They seem pretty beefy
Hi Dustin,

I don't know how well it applies here, the maximum surface speed for a cast iron flywheel is 6000 surface feet per minute.

the following calculation should work

Surface feet/min multiplied by 1 revolution / circumference = rpm

6000ft - - - - -1 revolution - - - - - - - 1910 revolutions
_____ - - X - - _________ - - = - - ______________
1 Min - - - - - - pi X 1foot - - - - - - - - - -1 min

All the dashes - - - are there just to make the fractions separate and the numbers line up.


Later,
Jerry Christiansen
 

Bubbles

Registered
Thanks everyone, last few updates for probably a few weeks.
Drilling the crankshaft webs, we tack welded them together during this operation.
Next prep for welding.
Next center drilling the crank.
Finally, after cutting out the throw area, it's actually pretty straight.
Ends will be trimmed after the build
Great project!

A little safety tip. NEVER wear gloves on any machine with rotating mechanisms. Clamp the part.
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
With your symmetric flywheels, you will have to keep engine speed low unless you use a counter weight on the crank to balance the reciprocating mass. If you are making an opposed cylinder engine (like a maytag twin for instance), you won't have to worry about flywheel counter balance. If a single cylinder, it will bounce around unless you make it VERY heavy. case in point - the Coldwell single and twins. They were not well balances but were mounted on a VERY heavy mower (about 350 pounds), which absorbed much of the vibration. If idled, these engines ran smooth enough, but if you sped them up, on a small skid, they would bounce around like a ball on steroids! :eek:

If you do not have a counterbalanced crank, you could try welding more material on the inside of the rims on your flywheels, if they are steel. If cast iron, counterbalancing the crank is probably a better idea.
 

Dustin D Ehli

Subscriber
Age
35
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
So, weekends when I can't get to the shop and work on the engine I usually sketch ideas into my legal pad.
Every time I think of something I put it in here before I forget.
All ideas I like go into here, this doesn't mean we will actually use that idea, could be a combination of multiple, it's just an idea hopper.
Couple of example pages.
 

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rodue

Registered
Re: Junk yard model engine

This model 7/16 scale IHC model M
Was fabricated using 1/8 thickness sheet cold rolled steel bar stock and a stick welder. I did purchase the cast iron fly wheels but it took a lot of work to make them look like the M
 

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