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KATO gen head

~Wittes-End~

Registered
I picked up an old Kato gen head. It doesn't have the voltage regulator. Does anyone know where I could find one? Is it possible to make one? Thanks
 

BTPost

Moderator
Staff member
Age
70
Last Subscription Date
12/29/2008
You Know..... Kato has built literally Hundreds of different models of
Genends. It would be of GREAT help, if you could give the rest of us
readers, a bit more information to work with. Like Series, Model, Serial
Number, Frame, RPM, Voltage, Ampperage, Phase, PF, or any
combination of the above...... A picture would be nice......

Bruce in alaska:crazy: :crazy: :crazy:
 

~Wittes-End~

Registered
Yep thats a pretty good point. I'll try to post some pics of the info plate and gen. That's about all the info I have on it. I am as green as can be when it comes to generators, so keep that in mind. If there is any literature on gen ends anyone could reccomend I'd appreciate it. Thanks
 

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BTPost

Moderator
Staff member
Age
70
Last Subscription Date
12/29/2008
Just a guess, but it looks like someone took an engine mounted Genend,
and built a InputShaft, Bearing, & FlexPlate System and made it into a
Two Bearing Genend. It is 6 Pole (1200 Rpm), 120/240 4 Wire, with
a Design PF of .8, and 15Kw. Can't tell from the picture if it is Brushless,
or just how it is excited. Did you call Kato and talk to a Product Support
Engineer? With the Model Number on the DataPlate, they should be able
to answer all your questions. You also might look at some of the Army
Tech Manuals and see if they match up to that Kato Model Number.

Bruce in alaska:crazy: :crazy: :crazy:
 

BTPost

Moderator
Staff member
Age
70
Last Subscription Date
12/29/2008
<<<I have not called Kato. I don't have the number.>>>

www.kato-eng.com/ and use the Contact Us / USA link

Goggle is your friend..........

Bruce in alaska:crazy: :crazy: :crazy:
 

Raymond

Registered
Age
71
Given the Era and nameplate data it most likely has a standard DC exciter with slip-rings. This requires a special regulator which is not cheap. Converting to a static exciter would be cheaper and it will respond about 3 times faster than the original exciter system.
 

Raymond

Registered
Age
71
Just remove the slip-ring brushes and measure the field resistance (across the slip rings only). Go to www.power-tronics.com (note - or you will get powertronics power monitoring, not related) and select the proper components. They can help you. Probably takes a XR500B regulator with SE350 exciter unit and an auto boot relay. You probably can't remove the exciter armature but just removeing the exciter brushes and disconnect all exciter field wiring will be sufficient. You must have a 6 volt battery or more in the system for booting the field each time it is started and some kind of relay or switch to provide about a 1 second pulse after the engine is started to bring up the field. The XR500B regulator may be able to handle your existing DC exciter if it takes less than 5 amps but I kinda doubt it. You can test it with batteries and an amp meter. Just start with 6 volts to see the output. It is linear so if 6 volts gives 80 volts output then 9 volts will give 120v output. It will require around 5 times this amount to handle large block loads. Thats why the regulator probably won't handle it.
 

Jim Rankin

Registered
Age
58
Have you spun the generator end up and checked it's output? I have a "new" relatively modern Kato generator end still on the skid that I hope has the regulator inside. It looks a lot like yours, with the exciter on the back, but is for direct mounting only. It probably has a PM generator on it, but I haven't dug into it to find out. Yours may only need a variable field resister to run it and check it out. That way you could measure some specific field voltage and amperage requirements under load. The really old regulators were only a mechanical method of substituting more or less resistance in the field circuit in response to voltage changes.


The rotating DC exciter/generator should take a relatively small current for it's field compared to the main alternator field it supplies. If it is operational and you can find a regulator for it, that would save you the expense of the static exciter module and should give you better motor starting/block loading capability than a static exciter. After all a static exciter takes its power from the AC output and when you drop a big load on the set, that AC voltage drops just when you need it most for the exciter. The best modern way to have good block loading response is the PM generator, but the old DC generator probably is the next most capable setup.
 
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