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Kohler 30RZ272 Weather Cover (30RZ)

Gampy

Registered
I have recently purchased a 30RZ272 33KW generator (natural gas or propane) . It is in pristine condition. It was located inside of a manufacturing facility and was used seldom but professionally maintained often. I was told that it was set to run for 30 min every week. Anyway, my application for it will be outside in a Farm residential environment as a standby generator for 3 homes. I do not have a weather cover for it. Does anyone know of where I can find a cover. The condition of the panels wouldn't matter. I also need any manuals that would go with it or its switch. Thanks in advance for any replies.
Model 30RZ272
Spec 183025-72N
Serial 224675
 
Last edited:

Zephyr7

Registered
I rarely see empty generator enclosures show up used. You need a lot of luck to find one that will work for your unit.

It’s not difficult to have an enclosure made up by a metal fab shop. Just be sure to have enough ventilation slots.

Bill
 

grub54891

Registered
Age
62
Last Subscription Date
06/08/2010
Might be easier to build an "outhouse" over it. Any small building that looks good will work. You could make it look like a doghouse, or knome house.
 

LWB250

Registered
You're best to fabricate something on your own or have someone do it for you. The likelihood that you would find a weather housing for this unit that was still in serviceable condition is pretty astronomical. Housings were rarely sold after the fact, as they were quite expensive as a sales order item and they did not come painted, only e-coated (primer).
 

Gampy

Registered
Well after searching I may attempt to build or have built an aluminum housing for my Kohler. Thanks to all of you that replied.
I would love to find where to obtain service/parts manuals for my unit. Can anyone help?
Model 30RZ272
Spec 183025-72N
Serial 224675
My immediate questions include the quantity of propane that it uses per hr. Under a normal load and how to switch it from nat gas to propane. The local Kohler dealer said it would use 3 to 4 gal. per hr.
 

LWB250

Registered
Well after searching I may attempt to build or have built an aluminum housing for my Kohler. Thanks to all of you that replied.
I would love to find where to obtain service/parts manuals for my unit. Can anyone help?
Model 30RZ272
Spec 183025-72N
Serial 224675
My immediate questions include the quantity of propane that it uses per hr. Under a normal load and how to switch it from nat gas to propane. The local Kohler dealer said it would use 3 to 4 gal. per hr.
And where do you live? That would help.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
Being in a rural environment, and being backup power for THREE homes, I would NOT look for an all-weather enclosure for the generator. I would build a hut around it, suitable for not just protecting IT from the elements, but protecting YOU from the elements when you have to maintain it during the conditions under which you need a generator working the most.

Clear a spot in convenient location, put down three inches of gravel, compacted. On this, pour an 8" slab about three and a half times the width of your generator, and about twice the length. Pour a 16" sonotube pier at each corner, sitting about 4" above the ground, and at least 6" away from the slab corner.
Build a shed with treated lumber that sits on the piers at all four corners, but is NOT attached to the slab... leave one end off, to facilitate installation of the generator. Bring the sides to about 2" above ground level, leave a 2" gap at the bottom... This gap will provide airflow for cooling and combustion, and prevent stray propane from accumulating.
The gap will be filled with a roll of fine wire mesh hardware cloth, and a layer of cloth buried an inch below ground, to fend off critters.

Build the sidewalls so that the low edge is at least 8 feet above the slab, give it a peak of at least 12ft. Bring propane in through the side wall. If using gaseous, your 2nd stage regulator will be mounted to the outside wall, with about a 1" pipe feeding your demand regulator. If liquid, the evaporator should be mounted on the wall, with engine coolant or oil circulating through the evaporator's jacket.

Make the building with an appropriate roof and walls. Exhaust from engine through TWO mufflers- first within a foot or three of the manifold, and the second about six-eight feet down the pipe, with BOTH pipes INSIDE the building. Exit the pipe Horizontally through the gable of the roof. Make sure there's about 3/8" air space around the pipe, so that engine vibration is not conducted through the pipe, into the building's skin. On the outside, exhaust needs a flip cover, AND place coarse stainless steel wool in the last 5" or so of the pipe such that birds and wasps will not be inclinded to try to enter if the cover is closed.

Condensation and combustion products cause water to accumulate in exhaust. Make sure that the exhaust system's natural moisture drain path does NOT pool water in the manifold, or in an elbow, but instead, will drain it naturally

When installing the generator, place the generator on the slab where, from top to bottom is a large steel washer, a piece of hardwood plank, and a segment of car tire tread. Through the middle, drill holes into the concrete, and drop smooth-sided pins through two opposite corners of the generator (not four). Do NOT use concrete anchors, as if you need to remove the generator, you'll have to jack the unit up, slip a saw under, and cut the bolts to get the machine out easily. Do NOT tighten the machine down- that only makes it transfer vibration into the slab, and ground, and building.

Put screened, louvered vents on the gable ends and access door.... if you're really catchy, put actuators on them that open anytime the engine is running.... and close as it cools off.

Put two lighting circuits and two electrical receptacles inside- one electrical circuit is powered by normal utility 120v, the other is directly powered off of the generator's output PRE transfer switch. Place TWO coach lamps on the outside of the building- one on each side of the access door. Like the outlets, one is powered from utility service, the other from the generator engine. This way, regardless of wether it's running or not, you'll be able to look out the window, and see, by virtue of those lights, wether you have utility feed, or running generator. When inside, you'll have work lights on utility, as well as when generator is running. You'll use the utility feeder as power source for your generator's float chargers, and engine heater, perhaps a thermostatically-controlled vent fan in the gable. In addition to the generator's starting battery, Add a rack with two extra batteries in parallel, a float charger, and a switch to an LED light inside, and another outside the shed, to provide emergency work lighting when things go wrong. Include a shelf inside the shed to hold oil filters, extra oil, spark plugs, air filter, coolant, and baking soda, and another to hold tools- screwdrivers, spark plug wrench, voltmeter/ammeter, Hang a fire extinguisher and a flashlight on the inside of the shed door, put hooks on the wall for spare fan-belts, your coat and hat.

I would suggest that you include a conduit from the hut to your home, where you can pull in at LEAST a few signal wires, with at least ONE alarm circuit... that when any problem (high water temp, exhaust temp, low oil pressure, current overload, etc) arises, an audible alarm will ring, and a second pair of wires as an emergency shutdown switch to stop it fast.

With the building skin decoupled from the generator, two mufflers (also decoupled from hard surfaces) it will be well protected from weather circumstances, and quiet when running.

If you're like me, you'll make the gen shed just a little bit bigger yet, and put a smaller generator (8kw liquid cooled or so) that provides a lower level of backkup power to provide for extreme emergency circumstances (i.e. keep sump pumps and furnaces running, work lights and tools inside the shed) in the case that the big generator is not operable.
 

dkamp

eMail NOT Working
33kw/hr equates to 112600btu/hr... and with the generating plant being about 30% efficient, that means you can figure it'll BURN about 450,000btu/hr. Propane is about 91,000btu/hr per liquid gallon, so worst case is no more than 5gal/hr.

What you REALLY want to know, is what's the BASE FUEL CONSUMPTION... that is... how much it burns JUST TO RUN, and then, perform a fuel-consumption-curve test on it to see what load level it is most fuel-efficient. Just to run, the engine needs to spin at synchronous speed to the line... which includes parasitic load like coolant recirculation, maintaining engine oil pressure, spinning the magneto, spinning the big cooling fan, and providing excitation current inside the big generator, and spinning the cooling fan in the generator head. The generator may be wound in a two-pole configuration, to spin at 3600rpm, but not likely. More than likely, the generator is a 4-pole (1800rpm) or 6 pole (1200rpm) design, which has some advantages in terms of base fuel consumption. My experience with my 35kw Kato (driven by a 338ci Hercules JXLD flathead inline six) is about 1.75 gal/hr BASE consumption, and it sees very little change in fuel demand from zero to about 18kw.

The REAL concern, if you're running propane, is having ENOUGH propane, liquified and of sufficient pressure to feed the engine. I run my 35kw Kato from the same feeder (1/2" soft copper ) from my TWO 1000-gallon 'farm submarines' 200ft back around the grain bins. You will NOT be running this 33kw Kohler on a pair of 20lb propane tanks... it takes evaporation SPACE, and ambient heat to make it fly well. If you go liquid withdrdawl, you'll be doing just fine with smaller lines, as the evap occurrs in the evaporator heated by engine coolant.
 

Zephyr7

Registered
+1 for the hut idea. I’d build the walls out of block though, and use a steel roof. This way you have a fire proof building. Allow at least three feet of clearance all the way around the unit, ideally 4 feet. I’d leave more space on the generator end so that you can fit some switchgear on the wall (code requires 3 foot clearance, 3.5 feet if you’re running 277/480v), and a small shelving unit for spare parts. A double door with no center post is a nice way to get the unit in/out if needed. Duct the radiator out through a metal louver. Put another louver on the opposite end, or a side near the back, of the hut. I’d run all the conduit up through the slab on the inside. You need at least three conduits: generator power out, utility power in (even if just for some service outlets), and control. Use at least 1” PVC conduit for each. Having two control conduits is nice since it allows for separate control and telemetry conduits.

You can get red/green explosion proof (sealed) lamp assemblies for industrial annunciators. Mount one on the outside of the hut near the door, wire the green light to the utility feed and the red one to the generator output. Now you know at a glance what is going on.

If you put dampers on the in/out louvers, the generator block heater is usually sufficient to heat the hut to reasonable (~45-50*F or so) temperatures in the winter.

I WOULD bolt the genset to the slab. If the genset has integral vibration isolators, use lag shields for anchors since you can remove the bolts and have nothing sticking out of the floor. Drop-in anchors (with threads inside and you set them with a special tool) also work. If your unit does NOT have integral vibration isolators, then you want to get some spring-type (grainger, McMaster Carr have them) vibration isolators, Mount those to the floor and mount the generator to them.

You get a very nice setup this way. I spec much larger versions of this commercially all the time. Be sure to use remesh in the slab, and, if using a metal door, you should run a ground wire and bond it to the frame of the door.

Bill
 
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