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Kohler 800w Light Plant

oliver1

Registered
Hello I have recently acquired this light plant ,I am looking for any information particularly a wiring diagram of the ignition circuit as there are 2 wires coming out of the flywheel area that are not connected to anything , any help or advice much appreciated as information is limited here in the uk .





 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Re: kohler 800w light plant

Wow, nice looking plant! I can send you a schematic for a Model D controller, which appears to be the same, or nearly so. It will explain the sequence of ooeration. I do not have any Model S manuals. Just PM an email address to me

The ignition on these is different as the Model D uses a magneto. This one appears to use battery ignition? Or perhaos there's a magneto mounted under the flywheel. Unfortunately I've yet to acquire a Model S or a manual for my collection.

Keith
 

Dale Burkman

Registered
Re: kohler 800w light plant

They were probably running it off a battery. One of the wires is to the magneto it should show some resistance to the housing { ground}. It hooks to the positive side of the coil. The other is the overspeed switch it should be open to the housing {ground}. It hooks to the points in the distributor {the terminal where the condenser and negative side of the coil connects}. I hope this helps Dale Burkman
 

oliver1

Registered
thanks for the replies I now have the flywheel off and have removed the coil .after various tests it has obviously past on and will need to be replaced .
obviously there is little or no spares in the uk does anyone in the USA have any ? and is willing to ship to the uk

 

Power

Registered
Well, if it is NG, you can't hurt it more.
Take all that tape off it and see what you got.
Those leads look dodgy. I see a bad spot in lead near coil.
Once you get it open, may find something easy to repair.
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Just curious what test it did not pass? I'm sure the most common failure is open secondary. But as Power says, you may be able to repair it.

I just watched a video yesterday where a guy *almost* condemned a coil because he didn't have the specs for it, but it turned out to be normal and ended up working.
 

oliver1

Registered
Well I stripped of the old tape and managed to get a reading on the primary side of the coil but despite my best efforts the secondary circuit is open no reading at all

 

Power

Registered
Keep going!
You got nothing to loose.
Strip everything off to bare coil.
You may get lucky and find bad spot is where you can repair it.
If you repair it, can always re-insulate.
 

Zephyr7

Registered
I’d check where that outer lead ties into the winding. Strip off tape until you can inspect that connection. It might be a fractured solder joint and an easy repair but DO NOT solder against the coil or you might burn off some enamel. Unwind a little bit so you can solder a little way from the coil, then wrap and tape. Put a bit of glass cloth tape between the soldered connection and the winding to protect the coil from abrasion.

If you can’t fix this coil, and no spares can be found, I don’t think it would be very difficult to make a wooden winding jig tonrewind this coil from scratch. It would be tedious, but doable. Magnet wire isn’t very expensive and you only need to match the same number of turns as the original coil.

Bill
 

GeneratorGus

Registered
Age
72
Oliver,
I agree with Vanman on the date, I have manuals for the S dated 1928 and 1938, pretty much identical. I have another manual for a model for an
800 watt dated 1947, which is the same generator with a Briggs motor. The covers on the manuals do not give specific letter designations, they are described by wattage and or type of operation such as 32Volt DC, 2 Cylinder models. I don't think they wanted the average owner to do his own repairs.

I tried to at least find the part# for the coil, the magneto parts are shown but part number on the page (plate they call it) ,only refers the number to the parts section in the back of the book, which is arranged in a some sort of coded mess.
The coils on both models look similar, maybe you should take your coil with you when you go to shows and flea markets, it may be possible to rig a Briggs coil to it.??? Ya never know!!
The pictures are Mod S, Mod M, and, of course, mine. The S runs on natural gas. I used to run it on propane, but it was pretty difficult to get the mixture right.

I may be persuaded to part with one of the manuals, PM me.

GUS
 

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oliver1

Registered
Thank you gentlemen for the information and dating at 1928 ,my ignition coil is currently being rewound and hopefully once its returned I can attempt to start this motor . spares for this engine and the 4 cylinder are unobtainable here in the uk so its a tricky model to restore
 

oliver1

Registered
After many months waiting its turn at my magneto repair man ive had bad news today .due to the method of construction it is not possible to repair my ignition coil . the reason being its to large to fit in the coil winding machine despite his best efforts . so as there is no chance of finding a spare in the uk is there any spare ignition coils (s-410) for my 1928 800watt light plant in the USA please and willing to ship to the uk
regards Oliver.

ps if this fails I will probably go down the coil and battery route .
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
My memory is poor, but I seem to recall someone on here winding an ignition coil for some small air cooled engine by themselves. They made a simple U shaped winding apparatus out of some bits of wood, making it large enough to turn the whole armature core within. It just had a hand crank on it, and I'd guess he used a counter of some kind to keep track of the number of turns. If you dig around in the small air cooled engine section you may find it. I want to say it was within the last few months that it was posted. A proper coil winding machine is a luxury! :D

Keith
 

oliver1

Registered
yes that's the problem most coil winding machines do not have a large enough swing to wind this type of coil
 

Zephyr7

Registered
All you need is an offset winding jig to keep the area of the coil in the approx center so that it can be wound. It’s not difficult to rig this up with wood and a few bolts has bearings. I can sketch a simple design when I get home later today.

Don’t give up! You can build a simple winding jig in an hour or two. You can count the number of turns in your head so you don’t need a turns counter. Magnet wire is inexpensive. Mostly you’ll just be spending time, probably around half a day to both build the jig and wind the coil. It’s not difficult, it’s just slow going.

Bill
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
"Can count the number of turns in your head" HA! Speak for yourself! :wave:

I can't even remember what CRS stands for! :D

I'd probably have to jot down chicken scratches for every ten or something. :bonk:
 

Zephyr7

Registered
I almost forgot about this.

The rig shown needs to be able to clamp the coil assembly from
Either side since you can’t clamp directly across the coil in the rotating area since that would block the winding operation. This means the frame needs to be stiff, and the bushings need to be smooth (I’d use scrap UHMW polyethylene, but any handy rigid plastic material should be ok). It’s a simple little winding jig but it’ll work.

Bill
 

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