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Lathe, Home Built

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Where is that?(don't give an exact location) That is pretty cool, do you post on the PM site? If not do you mind if I share them?

Edit: Trying to identify what it was made from, tailstock base looks like cream separator legs, headstock looks like an engine block and chuck is being powered by the flywheel ring gear.
 
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Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Where is that?(don't give an exact location) That is pretty cool, do you post on the PM site? If not do you mind if I share them?

Edit: Trying to identify what it was made from, tailstock base looks like cream separator legs, headstock looks like an engine block and chuck is being powered by the flywheel ring gear.
It is in the area where I live. I don't know what the PM site is, I don't care if you post on there. The engine block may be a model A or T Ford, I'm not sure. The cross slide slides on a head that is upside down. The shaft in between the two shafts the carriage rides on is threaded all the way. One connecting rod is connected to one journal of the crank and I don't know what it does.
 
Flywheel is definitely model A Ford........so the engine block probably is also. Pretty clever, probably something whipped up during the Great Depression. Can't afford a machinist? Build your own machine tool and do it yourself!
 

uglyblue66

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/07/2018
That would be in my yard for art if for nothing else,That is some serious make do with what you have right there.
That is what made America great was creativity like that in a time of need. I thought the flywheel kinda looked like 28 Chevy,I will have to look at mine and see.
 

mcmlvii

Registered
It's a cool piece of art now, although a bit heavy to move around, what with all the concrete. I wonder what kind of things were produced on it way back when.

PM is Practical Machinist (dot com)...
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Flywheel is definitely model A Ford........so the engine block probably is also. Pretty clever, probably something whipped up during the Great Depression. Can't afford a machinist? Build your own machine tool and do it yourself!
I knew the guy that lived there. He raised his family (wife and three or four girls) on that place. He is gone now, they didn't have much and he was well thought of. This world could use more guys like him. It is too bad he couldn't have a good lathe, hard telling what he could have built. I think he built the lathe out of what he had and didn't go to town and buy much if anything.
 

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/18/2019
Just WOW !
Fred & Barney's Lathe.
I doesn't get any more awesome than that.

.
 

cobbadog

Registered
It certainly is an amazing piece of engineering and thanks for sharing the pics. I also like the stand as much as the lathe, it is almost 'rock solid'.
 

Sonny Reese

Registered
Sure is a nice unit! I like the way he made slots in the flywheel for chuck clamps. --- He was a smart guy for sure.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Thank you Heins! Yes PM is Practical Machinist, the subject of homemade lathes has been popping up there quite a bit recently, mainly by newbs that think they can save $ by building one. It is kind of a touchy subject over there, some of the members appreciate ingenuity, others not so much:confused:. I posted those pics in the antique machinery section, so hopefully I won't get flamed too much;)
 

Tracy T

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/16/2019
well it begs the question to the ones who want to flame you over there, how was the very first lathe made? you had to start with something right?
 

cobbadog

Registered
I no longer visit the site. Was made unwelcomed by some who had no time for a beginner asking simple questions that meant a lot to me in my early stages of learning. So I stopped going there.
 

ronm

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Yep, PM has a high percentage of asshats & anal retentives...
Abusing newbies & those with less experience is pretty much a sport on machinist sites in general...
 
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cobbadog

Registered
Certainly not here and is why I enjoy reading through this site for engines, welding and machinery shop stuff. It is all very helpful. I had recently joined a couple of different forums to get the 'heads up' on what typr of drone to buy as I am a beginner. One site is absed around a high end brand and dont want to know about beginners even with a beginners section in their menu. Nothing helpful other than stating the bleeding obvious and asking what it was I was thinking of buying when in my initial post it was clear the choices I thought were good. So after a few weeks of insults I have stopped visiting.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Ok guys, PM bills itself as a site for professional machinists ( I barely qualify), and they are sticklers for rules, so newbs who post and violate the rules, do get a hard time. But just like this site, there is good people and good info to be had over there, just choose your wording carefully.

I posted the pics above in the antique machinery section, no flamage occurred;)

Edit: The latest flambe just started with a new poster wanting advice on how to use a submersible pump motor as a direct drive motor/headstock for a homebuilt lathe:ROFLMAO:. Yes we all have to start somewhere, but don't expect any machinist worth his/her weight in salt to do anything but laugh.
 
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Been thinking about this post since I first read it. The more I think about it, the more impressed I am.

First of all: using the engine block as a head stock. Bearings are already in parallel with the top of the block (or should be), so by simply bolting it to a level bed he's assured of decent alignment.

Second: using the existing crank shaft. Again, alignment with the bearings is assured, plus he has gears on one end for a drive system.

Third: using the flywheel as the basis for a chuck or faceplate. Same thing.....good alignment, PLUS enough mass that it acts as, well, a flywheel to keep speeds constant.

The tail stock looks a bit flimsy to say the least, but we have to realize that he used whatever was available at the time. Looks like the carriage and tool post were made from a pump base, or maybe a rear axle half? The only thing I see that looks like a drive system is the steel bar between the ways. Can't see much detail but I'd sure like to!

Finally, he embedded both ends in enough concrete to sink a battleship in order to guarantee stability. Yup........he did a damn fine job all around.
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Here are some pictures taken closer so you can see how he built some of it. The first picture is the lever that will reverse the lead screw. The second picture is if you push down on the lever, it will engage the lead screw and move the lathe bit.
 

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uglyblue66

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
11/07/2018
What did he use for powering it? I do wish more folks had this much drive to build and do as this guy did. This is a lost art.Now adays it is, Slide the lexan loan shark and get a new chineseism made thing delivered right to your door.Or just throw away what is broken and get a new 1 and not repair or build anything.
 
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