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Lathe, Home Built

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
What did he use for powering it? I do wish more folks had this much drive to build and do as this guy did. This is a lost art.Now adays it is, Slide the lexan loan shark and get a new chineseism made thing delivered right to your door.Or just throw away what is broken and get a new 1 and not repair or build anything.
I don't know what he powered it with, I would guess a small gas engine.
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Git 'er done! That thing fits the name "engine lathe" better than any other one I've ever seen...the term "engineering by inventory" comes to mind too.
I can't figure out what the connecting rod does. There is a piece of wood in a metal bracket that I think was connected to the bracket on the end of the connecting rod. Help me out!
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I can't figure out what the connecting rod does. There is a piece of wood in a metal bracket that I think was connected to the bracket on the end of the connecting rod. Help me out!
Maybe connecting rod somehow was connected to the feed lever on carriage? With every rotation it advanced feed just a little bit? Basically an intermittent feed, that is my best guess. Feed screw running thru center was a common way to do it on some older lathes, my guess is the builder of this lathe had seen one, or at least studied drawings then made do with what he had on hand.

For someone in a remote location of a 3rd world country with no other choice than to build one, I can see doing it. If someone in the USA wants to build one just to say they did it, I could support that on the caveat that they have mechanical experience, and they have studied how a lathe works. But it seems most of the posters of "I want to build a lathe" have zero experience building anything, they have not studied a lathe in detail, and they think somehow its going to be cheaper than actually buying one. I think its like someone saying they are going to build a car, yet they have never even worked on one.

Yes we all have to start somewhere, if a lathe is where you want to start, make a wood lathe, its a lot simpler. There is a young kid on YT that built a lathe, he had to make revisions as he learned more, for a bunch of scrap he made a half decent little machine

Cannot find the vid at the moment, but there is an engineer type that built a lathe, money was no object, its nice! Search YT for homemade lathe.
 
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Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
D-Girl, I was thinking the same thing that it may advanced the feed a little each time it went back and forth. There are parts missing so I can't tell.

One of his daughters lives in town and I just talked to her about the lathe. She didn't know when it was built but she thought it may have been built back in the 30's. She said it has been there ever since she can remember. I told her when she grew up in the 40's, she probably had other things on her mind besides lathes. She said that she had an uncle (her dad's brother) that was a machinist so he knew how a lathe was built. He helped her dad build the lathe.

You haven't gotten much response on PM.
 

ronm

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Lets see...maybe he hooked the connecting rod to the pump rod on a windmill? Wind powered lathe? I dunno...:unsure:
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
Lets see...maybe he hooked the connecting rod to the pump rod on a windmill? Wind powered lathe? I dunno...:unsure:
I think I have seen a pedal powered lathe at Mt Pleasant steam engine show.
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
If that wood stick was 3 or 4' long, they may have powered the lathe by hand. If they removed the gear to the flywheel, they could make the engine crankshaft turn by moving the stick back and forth. I don't know.
 

Combustor

Registered
Is it possible it had a treadle attached, sewing machine style? A second person could provide the power while the operator
drove the machine. Small wood turners and metal lathes were often powered this way.
Regards,
Combustor.
 

cobbadog

Registered
If it was a treadle driven lathe and using a second person for the power, you wouldn't want the operator to be taking deep cuts. you would end up with a nice set of legs on you if he did.
 

ronm

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Heins should find out if the one daughter has strong legs. . . :rolleyes:
 

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/18/2019
I'm thinking you fellas need to look at this connecting rod thing again.
Keep in mind that to operate this con-rod, you would need to be sitting or standing on the upper structure ... ABOVE the engine block. Yes .. at first glance it looks like you could operate it from the side ... but you can't ... because when the crank throw rotates down into the block .. the rod would no longer be able to remain horizontal .. as it is in the picture. It would need to be operated ABOVE .... or even below .. by going down through the cylinder & operating something under the lathe.

I have no flippin idea what it was for ... just trying to help you guys to figure it out.

.
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
I'm thinking you fellas need to look at this connecting rod thing again.
Keep in mind that to operate this con-rod, you would need to be sitting or standing on the upper structure ... ABOVE the engine block. Yes .. at first glance it looks like you could operate it from the side ... but you can't ... because when the crank throw rotates down into the block .. the rod would no longer be able to remain horizontal .. as it is in the picture. It would need to be operated ABOVE .... or even below .. by going down through the cylinder & operating something under the lathe.

I have no flippin idea what it was for ... just trying to help you guys to figure it out.

.
I am just guessing because I don't know. I think the wood in the lower bracket and the connecting rod has something to do with each other. I wish I could have talked to George, he would have told me how it worked.
 
I goofed and owe everyone an apology..............I looked at the first pictures and thought the "headstock" was made from model A Ford parts. Not so. I failed to notice that the engine block has no center bearing for the crank shaft! So, at this point I'm at a loss as to what engine it is let alone how it's supposed to operate. Yeah, that connecting rod assembly's got me scratching my head too............

What's important is that the original builder assembled this machine to suit HIS purpose.........so he wasn't bound by conventional thinking!
 

cobbadog

Registered
So it may be a case of Chev power over Ford. I don't think that you need to appologise for anything. It is and was a perfectly honest mistake and has not harmed anyone.
 

Heins

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/02/2020
It may be a Chev engine, if that is the head off the engine which it probably is, it is an overhead valve engine. I think that is what Chev engines were and Chev used the dip oiling system for the rod bearings up into the 50's. I don't see any oil holes in the rod journals.

If you look at the #4 rod journal, it isn't that far below the bottom of the engine block. I think they could turn the crank by moving the wood stick from the side. It would have to be high enough so the connecting rod would clear the bottom of the block.
 
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