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Lets see some picture's of small steam engine's.

Lester Bowman

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Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Hi Ron :)

You have posted so many pics of some of the most unique steam engine's I have ever seen all in one thread. Many other's have posted as well and I sure hope these picture's keep coming. This is a definitive thread making me think an entire book could result from all this which is something sorely needed in our hobby.

One could go through this thread enjoying its images or one could slow down and really learn from these engine's. There are many wonderfully unique engine's here which represent engine's actually built and used in the past both here and abroad. Stationary, marine, workshop, small power, Corliss, compound's, triple expansion, beams and on and on and on. Each one of these engine's have a specific use and time period and this thread in such a marvelous way depicts the history of steam power in small package's.

Some so unique as to be one of a kind. Searching deep behind these image's we discover men who dreamed of new idea's. Most of these men are lost to time but their idea's survive in the form of these small engine's. These men not only developed news ideas but left a lasting legacy to our world knowing and hoping the work of their hands might be understood by other's. Hoping these objects of power would be handed down through the right hands and live on in a changing world. You men who have posted in this thread have treasured these things but also have kept a forgotten legacy alive.

Think of this.. unknown men long gone but their genius and existence continue's in the form of cast iron, brass and steam. I think this legacy better and more fitting than some forgotten stone in a grave yard. Thanks to all who thus far have posted. I treasure these image's in this thread.
 

Ronald E. McClellan

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Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Here is one that I would like to have identified. I bought it at the Cabin Fever show this past January and had it on my table running. When I first saw it , I thought that it was a turbine , but it is not. It runs with a little bit of a chugging sound , and will run slow or fast with power. There are no numbers or names. It is 17" lg. and has a 9" flywheel with a pully for a round belt as part of the flywheel. I would like to see the inside to see how it works , but it runs great and I'm not going to chance taking it apart. Ron
 

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Ronald E. McClellan

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Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
Here is a Corliss engine that I restored. I got the parts in a box at an auction several years ago. I didn't like the solid flywheel , so I replaced it with something that looks much better. I mounted the parts on a 3/16" thk iron base , then cleaned and painted it , then on an oak base. It has a 7 3/4" flywheel. Ron
 

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Ronald E. McClellan

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Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
This is a model of a German Sulzer engine with a 10" flywheel. It has a side shaft with poppet valves. The valves on the top are steam supply , and the valves on the bottom are the exhaust. When I got it there were just blocks holding it up. I had a cabinet maker friend make a showcase type base for it. There are glass panels in the sides and a mirror on the bottom so you can see the exhaust valve action.
 

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Lester Bowman

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Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Here are pic's of a very early American built engine owned by a friend still existing on its original Cherry wood base.

What astonishes me are the men who began the preservation of these engine's at such an early date. The provenance of this singularly unique engine includes the name's of men who understood how important it was for this engine to survive. It is a wonder it survived and a jewel in the minds of men who see such things in terms of design, craftsmanship and innovation.

I like to think during the time it was built and fitted it WAS the best that could be had. The Wrought iron spoke's in the flywheel and torturous steam passage's all spoke of progress in small power's. A few of us yet carry that SPARK which connect us to those men who worked in dimly lit shops. We see what a wonderful accomplishment it was for such an engine to be built, for such a thing to come from the minds of men. We see the idea taking form on paper and the wooden pattern's and iron castings. We hear a water wheel and the ring of anvil and the leather splice whispering in the background. And the men, such men! Men who could and did and their memory preserved in such a beautiful and lovely little engine.

What a privilege it is to view such a thing nearly two century's after its inception. It speaks to those who listen, a jewel to those who treasure such whispering's.
 

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Ronald E. McClellan

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Last Subscription Date
01/05/2020
I got this engine about 10 years ago. It was not completed , parts missing , not running , But I has a vision of what it was going to look like when I was done with it. I worked on it for 9 months almost every day. There is not enough room to here to go over the entire rebuild. The most amazing thing that I found while cleaning and painting is that there are no castings on this engine. All of the parts were a combination of machining , hand formed , of separate pieces , then brazed / soldered together. It has a 12" flywheel and a 19" beam. Ron
 

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