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Lindsey air compressor with Merkle Engine

s100

Registered
Photo, please, assuming you can get them to load (I used to be able to, but not any more.) Videos are too much bother and trouble.
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
Many years ago, I had one of these units. It would maintain 100 PSI. It was noisy! :eek: All external moving parts lubed with an oil can - SAE 20 oil. the engine and compresor also used SAE 20 oil. Crankcases drained, then filled to overflow of the fill ports - in my case upturned street elbows in the castings on the block.
 

Junkologist

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
I run SAE 30 oil in both of mine with no problems.

I'm curious what your serial number is. One of mine has a documented build date of 1929.
 
Last edited:

K-Tron

Registered
Although not exactly the same, I have a vintage 1952 Devilbiss engine driven compressor which runs SAE 20 oil. Even if you use the right oil, changed at the right intervals, you can still end up with major compressor troubles. I used to use my compressor all of the time, until it started banging very loud under light use. I had went through the engine, Wisconsin AHHD, and never really messed with the compressor head. Somehow after four years of use, eight oil changes, and about 600 hours of run time (mostly for running my sandblast cabinet and external blaster), a stuck ring free'ed up and blew the top ring landing off a low pressure piston. The top face of that piston got stuck in the valve, and it destroyed the compressor in the 15 seconds it took for me to run to the compressor and disengage the clutch. The moral of the story is, now I always check the rings even on new to me compressors. Compressors build up a lot of condensation in the cylinders and valve heads. I would hate to see that beautiful Lindsay compressor suffer the same fate. I wish I had a compressor like yours in my collection, they are very cool! I have one Lindsay, two Schramm's and literally 4 tons of electric Quincy compressors. I can never seem to have enough compressors!

Chris
 

RustySteele

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/11/2019
I had two of these Merkel powered Lindseys years ago, nice little machines! The one that was running I used 30 weight oil in it with no problems. I did notice that one had the magneto driven off of the camshaft, and the other one was driven off of the crankshaft. I don`t know which was older, one was missing the nameplate so there was no serial number to compare, but it`s an interesting difference between them.
 

Junkologist

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/28/2019
I did notice that one had the magneto driven off of the camshaft, and the other one was driven off of the crankshaft. I don`t know which was older, one was missing the nameplate so there was no serial number to compare, but it`s an interesting difference between them.
I believe the flywheel magnetos are earlier than the chain driven magnetos.
 

pythons37

Registered
This guy might be of some help. I live 30 street numbers from their buildings. They closed up because of high Insurance Premiums. It would have cost too much to modernize and become compliant. It was a busy, busy place.

https://esmith46.w3.uvm.edu/cs008/assignment9.0/pklindsay.php

He ended up with the parts. I don't know if he is actually making the compressors. I don't think so. He might be able to point you in a direction for information, though. Good luck.
 

Engineguy64

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/24/2019
I have the same Lindsey compressor, i always wondered why they have such a large fuel tank. Then i was told they were wheeled out into the cementaries an the compressor was used to put the second date on the stone, so it would not need to be taken back to the shop. made sense to me Cliff
 

grega

Registered
Last Subscription Date
10/30/2016
If you do decide to sell it I would be very interested.
-Greg
 

Andrew Mackey

Moderator
Last Subscription Date
05/14/2017
I paid $50 for mine, not running. After fixing it up, it sold for $250. That was about 10 years ago. Now??? The engine and compressor both had the same issue - the open ended crank pins. Both sides use a single sided big end throw, and they were forged into the crank disc. Years of hammering loosenned the pins in the discs. It was a real RPA to clean the discs and braze the pins back in solid and true. I will say one thing - the unit was not well balanced and on a hard surface, would walk all over the place! On grass or dirt, it would just settle down a bit. it sure would get a lot of attention though! :cool:
 
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