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Line Shaft Blacksmith Shop Video

Joel Sanderson

Registered
A clam is a part made in two halves that fastens together to hold something between them, either loosely or tightly. Lillico, plate 64 on page 131 shows one form. Isn't it interesting how the corners are made? That's a standard way of making a square corner under a power hammer. It's so easy to do if the tools are proportioned right, while it's a pain in the neck with an anvil. You start by fulling both sides of what will be the corner, turning the stock over and then pushing the area between the fullers into a V block by holding a male V on the top side. You need a deep enough V-block with a tall enough male V on top so that you don't forge the stock anywhere but into the bottom of the lower V. Even if the V is shallow and the arms get pushed horizontally, you can straighten them later as long as you didn't forge them (thin them) on top of the V block. You have to be careful not to push the iron too far into the V and make it thin though. The radius of the fulling tool needs to match the bend and stock size so you're mostly just forming and not forging the iron into the V. A kiss block will help you there though, if you're doing very many.

In the example in plate 64, the upper, male V is quite rounded, to give the radius they show in the illustration. This also helps push the metal ahead of it. As a rule of thumb, a tool greater than 1/3 the thickness of the stock will push the metal ahead of it, while a tool less than 1/3 the thickness of the stock will allow the metal to pass around it. (Clifton's good 'ol 3:1 rule shows up again!) So part of the reason for the roundness is to push the metal ahead of the tool and fill the lower die (the V block).

Here's a picture of a simple loose clam that engages the clutch on my Reid. There's a knob that sticks up on each side which fits the handle to engage and disengage the clutch.
 

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Monsonmotors

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Last Subscription Date
10/07/2018
Joel,
If the period lineshafts, pulleys and hangers are hard to find...the lineshaft clutches must be hen’s teeth! Unobtanium, it would seem.
I don’t believe I’ve ever seen a lineshaft clutch for sale on EBay or anywhere else. I’ve looked practically every day for two years.
 

Monsonmotors

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Last Subscription Date
10/07/2018
I have so much to learn! Looks like clam and clamp are two closely related words.
Words like fuller and forge (the verb) are probably best learned AT the forge and power hammer.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/07/2018
Joel, when you first obtained your various power hammers, how did you know if they were immediately usable or if they needed new Babbitt bearings, etc?
 

Joel Sanderson

Registered
I have so much to learn! Looks like clam and clamp are two closely related words.
Words like fuller and forge (the verb) are probably best learned AT the forge and power hammer.
Except that clams have been around since the late Proterozoic Period. We just adapted the concept a few short millennia ago. ;)
 
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Joel Sanderson

Registered
Joel, when you first obtained your various power hammers, how did you know if they were immediately usable or if they needed new Babbitt bearings, etc?
You never know when you buy an old machine of any kind. Pay and hope. The only one of my hammers that didn't need any work at all was my 25 pound Little Giant. It's running just like it was made yesterday. Good 'ol Little Giant! The last hammer I got was two years ago, and it surprised me with a broken crank I didn't know about and a broken helve in shipping. Still waiting for me to get to it.
 
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