Logging Railroad

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
My Grandfather ran logging camps near the Soo line on the Minnesota/Wisconsin border south of Superior, Wi. in the early 1900's.
In the photos of his camps are a few pics of a Porter 0-4-0 and link and pin coupled log cars.
About 10 yrs ago, I visited the site of one of the camps called The Rock Cut Spur. We could still make out where the buildings and train siding were.

last winter, I purchased a Lehman G scale Porter made in Germany and log car kits from SE Asia to recreate the train with my logging items.

I made the 4 horse team and log load for my fathers 65th birthday in 1968
and had the back ground painted similar to one of the original pics of the tar paper covered logging camps.
 

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Onan Dan

Sponsor
Nice to go back in time and see how those men had it in the early years i wonder today how many would be able to work like they did? My dad was old school he would not own a tractor we did it all with the teams of horses we logged with them that one feller has him a rifle and a big white snow shoe hare :)
 

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
Nice to go back in time and see how those men had it in the early years i wonder today how many would be able to work like they did? My dad was old school he would not own a tractor we did it all with the teams of horses we logged with them that one feller has him a rifle and a big white snow shoe hare :)
the second Fellow from the left is my Grandfather Alfred. he was the camp Boss.
in most camp pics, the men would hold their working tools or favorite possession. i see a Harmonica and a concertina as well as axes, etc. :)
 

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
the second Fellow from the left is my Grandfather Alfred. he was the camp Boss.
one of the stories my Dad told was that the fellows complained that it was too cold to work when it got to 35 below,
so Grandpa smashed the thermometer and said "now it's not too cold, get to work!" :O
 

LCJudge

Subscriber
Neat Marv. I'm a Director at the Ky Railway Museum located about 15 miles from me. We have one of the saddle tank small locomotives sitting at our entrance. It came from the Louisville Cement Company and was used to haul limestone from the quarry to the kilns to make the cement. Evidently those little engines were real workhorses in their day hauling rock, sand, logs, coal and on and on.
 
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