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Lunkenheimer glass bottle oiler

Devilcock62

Registered
Does anyone have an actual picture of these installed and in use, I have some but not sure how they would have been mounted ? Also how was the flow rate regulated ? I’m sure I’m missing some pieces to be able to actually use them. 2808A4F0-ECAA-471A-B69A-18F418E7A6F2.jpeg2808A4F0-ECAA-471A-B69A-18F418E7A6F2.jpeg
 

Bill Hazzard

Registered
Last Subscription Date
08/28/2008
The tube just fits in a hole on top of a bearing. You are missing the pin that goes inside the tube. The pin is a sliding fit in the tube and should be flattened some inside the ball so it doesn't fall out. In operation the pin rides on the rotating shaft in the bearing which vibrates the pin which allows a little air into the ball which allows a little oil out of the ball. The feed is regulated by how close a fit the pin has to the inside of the tube, a looser fit will flow more oil.
When not in operation for a long period of time, they should be taken out of their holes and stored tube up so the oil doesn't run out. Variations in temperature will pump the oil out when not in use and will waste the oil.
 

Dale Russell

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
08/29/2019
I have fill many of those in the Pipeline industry. They are used to maintain the oil level in Bearing housings at a certain point or level. You fill the glass ball full of oil, Turn it upside down & place it in another holder that you don't have. Oil will come out of the end of the tube with the 45* cut on the end until oil covers the end of the opening of the 45* cut stopping the oil from coming out and creating a Vacuum in the glass Ball.
 
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