• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron machinery, register and join us. When you register on Smokstak, please give complete answers and fill in all blanks. IF YOU ARE ON WIRELESS OR SATELLITE, GIVE YOUR CITY AND STATE! NO ZIPCODES! All registrations are manually approved.

Making a long reach spark plug for a Reid

Peter Holmander

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Some years back I remember a post where a member was using a rolling hearth furnace ignitor to run his Reid instead of a spark plug. I have searched for more info on this topic here but have not been able to find anything. Anyone familiar with this member? Or anyone ever seen this done on a Reid before? I am interested in making one of those long reach plugs to run mine on as I have read where this puts the spark where the sweet spot is when you install the plug on the top of the engine casting between the charging cylinder and the main firing cylinder. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

Ed Radtke

Registered
Age
62
Re: Making a long reach spark plug for a reid

we used those at work when building 500000-1000000 btu make up air heaters for restaurants.search for auburn igniter plug and see what pops up.
 

Peter Holmander

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Re: Making a long reach spark plug for a reid

Thanks Ed. I have found the topic that discussed this briefly and it was posted by JH Foster, a member from Mississippi. I hope he sees this and jumps in on my question. If anyone here knows him, please contact him and ask him if he can share more detail about his setup. The original post is 9 yrs. old, so who knows. Maybe he does not own his Reid engine anymore. I tried emailing him through this site and am hoping it's a good email address.
 

Sekiar

Subscriber
Age
80
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
Re: Making a long reach spark plug for a reid

I'm using that location for my air start input and spark plug. Making the spark plug about three inches from the hole in the center between cylinders. Works just fine. Propane and model "T" Ford coil.
 

Kirk Taylor

Registered
Re: Making a long reach spark plug for a reid

Some years back I remember a post where a member was using a rolling hearth furnace ignitor to run his Reid instead of a spark plug. I have searched for more info on this topic here but have not been able to find anything. Anyone familiar with this member? Or anyone ever seen this done on a Reid before? I am interested in making one of those long reach plugs to run mine on as I have read where this puts the spark where the sweet spot is when you install the plug on the top of the engine casting between the charging cylinder and the main firing cylinder. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.
Pete,
I've made a few extra-long-reach spark plugs for Reids over the years. I use take-apart plugs and extend the electrodes.
If you want something commercially made, here is the Auburn catalog:
http://www.federalmogul.com/digital...ages/English/Documents/AUB_ProductCatalog.pdf

Enjoy!

Kirk
 

Peter Holmander

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Re: Making a long reach spark plug for a reid

Cool catalog Kirk ! The ignitor section is just what I was looking for. They even make them with 1/2 inch npt threads. Thanks for sharing.
 

Peter Holmander

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Hey Kirk, what did you use for material to extend the electrodes? How did you fasten it. Braze? The ground post has to be extended too correct?
 

Kirk Taylor

Registered
Hey Kirk, what did you use for material to extend the electrodes? How did you fasten it. Braze? The ground post has to be extended too correct?

Pete,
Most anything will work to extend the electrodes so long as it's rigid enough to "not blow around in the wind". There is a modest amount of vibration and turbulence that it will need to endure. Without the support of the porcelain, the electrodes rely on their own integrity to remain unscathed.
First, choose a spark plug in which the center electrode extends significantly beyond the porcelain. I torch weld the extension to the existing electrode; having some space between the weld area and the porcelain affords protection from the expansion and extreme heat from the weld. It takes only a couple of seconds to fuse the two, but the heat still conducts a bit. Choose a wire size not significantly larger than the existing electrode so as to avoid introducing a lot of localized stress from vibration. I choose a heavier wire for the ground electrode. It can be either threaded into the end of the spark plug housing, if the housing is thick enough to drill and tap, or torch-welded to it. To answer your question, yes, you do need the ground electrode as well. All you are doing is moving the spark plug gap further away from the plug body; you need to extend both electrodes.
With regard to the material, I rummage around through the pile until I see something I like. :) Wire with some nickel content is attractive because of the corrosion resistance, but, all things considered, it isn't necessary; stay away from copper because it's too soft and may bend. Ni-chrome heating element wire is great to work with. It's easily scrounged, and can be torch-welded to most ferrous metals. Plain old steel fence wire is quite adequate, though. If you need to stiffen a piece of round wire a bit, just cold-hammer it square.
Keep the length about ½" short of the bottom of the hole. If your plug goes beyond the bottom, the cross-over valve might squash it.

Kirk
 
Top