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Marine Engine - maybe Midland?

Larry Evans

Subscriber
Age
83
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
Hi....

The attached pictures are of a small 2 cycle marine engine my brother just dug out of storage and he is trying to get it going again. It has a 9 inch diameter flywheel and a Schebler carburetor. It appears that the ignition timing device is home made. There is no tag and no visible casting numbers so we have no information at all as to what it is. He found a couple of small pictures of a Midland engine that look similar online but nothing definitive.

As the pictures show there have been a couple of large weld repairs but the compression is good and it should run without too much work. What would be a safe gas/oil mixture when we try to start it? The blue paint job (with tape pin striping) is the way he got it years ago but he found some traces of red on the flywheel that might have been the original color. I have put a few more pictures on my web site at:
http://www.oldengine.org/members/levans/marine/

Any and all help regarding identification and information will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Larry Evans
 

Attachments

Mike

Subscriber
Age
76
Last Subscription Date
12/14/2019
Larry,
No help on what it is but I thought you needed some type of check valve between the engine and the carb on these two-stroke engines. Am I confused? Nothing new, if I am.
Mike
 

Larry Evans

Subscriber
Age
83
Last Subscription Date
12/20/2019
Larry,
No help on what it is but I thought you needed some type of check valve between the engine and the carb on these two-stroke engines. Am I confused? Nothing new, if I am.
Mike
Mike, this is the first marine and the first two cycle old engine my brother and I have worked with so we are still in the learning phase. After looking at Harry's page with his discussion of restoring his Gray engine and looking at the pictures of the carburetor we understand what you are talking about. We are pretty sure that this engine does not need the check valve since the fuel intake is relatively high up on the cylinder wall and not directly into the crankcase like some engines. As far as we can tell the carburetor never sees the positive pressure in the crankcase due to the location of the fuel transfer port. I'm sure we will find out when we try to fire it up.

Regards,
Larry Evans
 

Ernie D

Registered
The engine is one of the Detroit Auto Marine family. It is a 3 port and does not need a check valve.
Many pics and info at www.oldmarineengine.com Use the search function at the top of the discussion board.
Hope this helps
Ernie
 
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