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Marklin 4102 Hot Air Engine and Fascinating Compressor or Steam Engine Cutaway Model

Gil Garceau

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2019
I managed to find 2 great pieces to bring home from the
Eliot, Maine Show 2017 at the Raitt Family Farm.

They put on a great show each year at the end of July.

This morning and yesterday I was able to acquire a prototype cut-away model of a compressor or steam
engine and a wonderful old large Marklin Stirling Cycle Engine with 2 flywheels and 2 power pistons.

I have learned a little more from an old Battenberg Sammler Kataloge from 1983.


The Marklin appears to be a very rare No 4102 from 1907.

The only picture I have seen of another like it was sent by a friend overseas.
He saved it from a sale about 10 years ago.




Enjoy,

Gil







I have learned a little more from an old Battenberg Sammler Kataloge from 1983.


The Marklin appears to be a very rare No 4102 from 1907.






---------- Post added at 03:56:07 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:53:24 PM ----------

 

Brent Rowell

Registered
Last Subscription Date
08/14/2016
Thanks for posting Gil. The Marklin was also listed as Model no. 4172 in their 1912 catalog, so they were probably sold up until WW1. The postwar 4171 and 4172 models were more efficient beta designs with much better cooling; these earlier beasts tended to quickly overheat and stop running.

The other engine certainly looks like a patent model--now if you could only find the patent!
 

Gil Garceau

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2019
Update:

Yesterday I had one power piston rod disconnected from the crank arm and it wanted to run
with just one attached. I held the loose one in place so it wouldn't pop out of it's bore. I then
hooked it back up and disconnected the crank arm on the other end of the crank shaft.
It ran with the other one alone too......
HOWEVER.... it was in the opposite direction. So now we know the timing was way out of sync.

I gave parallel motion a call and we agreed that both power pistons likely needed to move
up and down together. He steered me back to Peter's picture of the blue one and pointed
out the power pistons on that one appeared to be set to move in unison.
After resetting the timing and wiping a little sludge from the power piston bores,
I have achieved a bit of success.

I know heat dissipation is not a highlight of this design so I thought it might need a little
cooling help from a couple wadded up damp paper towels which I found it didn't need
at least for the first 7 or 8 minutes, after which it began to slow down a bit. This when the
flame grew larger and larger as the burner heated up and began spewing more
fumes into the mix. I think an evenly regulated heat source would be much better.

Gil

Here is a fresh video:

 

Gil Garceau

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2019
Update..........

I decided to run it with a small Bix burner which is easy to regulate reliably.

I got a great result with a run that lasted nearly 40 minutes.

Below it is condensed into 7 minutes in this video.

Enjoy,

Gil

 
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