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Marmon Trucks? Anyone?

cornbinder89

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
05/11/2020
One thing is for sure, in the 20's Marmon was high "high end" in cars. On the Wiki page about the Nairn Bro there is a link to a page about them setting up the desert run and the vehicles they tried. At 1st they settled on Cadillac as it out preformed even Roll Royce for desert work. They prized durability over cost, and found the Caddy fit the bill. They tried several mfg from many several counties, and politically would have been better off using British built chassie, but never found one that was up to the task. They tried Olds and Buick as well. After the route was established, they switched to night runs to keep the heat problems down for both people and vehicles. Tires were a major problem, they found that running 70 mph on hot desert would cause the tubes to "vulcanize" to the tire, and replacing a tube became impossible.
They also had A/C on some later equipment before it was used over here. Amazing!
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
CB, I’ve see some of those heat or age-vulcanized tubes to tire in Central ca. Lol. Sawzall time. Horrible. I hate that!
 

PFT

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/07/2020
What an odd frame! The angular kick up over the rear axle is unusual. Looks more modern than it is. Most early frames are flat (like Model T) or have a slight bump?? You know when they are showing the chassis lubrication PIPING diagram that this is a special vehicle.
Bowen Products Corp. is still in business in Nedrow NY, the current owner moved it there several years ago for a better building. The original one in Auburn NY was getting pretty rough the last time I was there. Used to ride motorcycles with his family.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
I agree!!!!
I have to say again though that when these old trailers got made they usually were made from one vehicle. In the case of the “pickup bed” trailers you usually find the same make axle and spindles, wheels, etc under the bed. (It’s like Christmas for me).
The gentleman who is researching this particular frame thinks it’s an early Marmon truck prototype that got chopped up for the “ag trailer” treatment. If I hadn’t seen “grand era” car frames made into cotton trailers with my own two eyes I would think he’s crazy. Until we got run off at the local cotton gin (all out of business?), a friend and I would cruise the rows and focus on wheels, hubcaps and frame appointments.
Huge old teens/twenties Cadillacs and the like had pretty underpinnings!
To think that a place as “austere” as this (Central CA) is hiding golden age Marmon, Cadillac, Packard, Pierce Arrow parts is thrilling!
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
I may come up with my own Central CA “Map of the Stars” and sell them. Lol. First stop, a 1940s Autocar parked behind a farm house about three miles from here. WWI and WWII vehicles of all descriptions made into ag trucks...
WWII fighter air plane wheels used under rolling stock..
A real WWII Army Air Force training base that still exists...
Lonely old farms trucks all over the place.
 

cornbinder89

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
05/11/2020
I imagine a lot of those "grand era" stuff likely spent their early years in tinsel town, and when the depression hit, their value was more in what they could be used for than what they were. They migrated to where they could be used.
Narin's really liked the Caddy chassies.
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
CB, without continuing to bore everyone with my stories there are rich ranchers on the “West Side” of the San Joaquin Valley.
The east Side where I am (up against the Sierra) are the poorer, smaller folks.
I’m sure an old West Side rancher could’ve afforded anything he wanted.
I have an extremely straight (because it was only used for a short time) 1940 International D-2 pickup that came from the McCloud ranch near Tracy, CA. These rancher folks were so rich they never maintained or fixed anything they just always bought new. Since they never greased the chassis of my truck it broke a front leaf spring and there it sat in a barn for 70 years!
It arrived at my shop on my birthday about six years ago and I put the only locally known good D-2 front leaf spring on it.
Every grease zerk was stuck! I honestly think it was never serviced. It did start and run.
 

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Bud Tierney

Registered
To get back to Marmon "trucks"---there was one, possibly two, types 1912-16 per Mroz's US Truck Ency. There are two listings, confusing...neither are the Marmon-Herrington 31-63 and 1975 per Mroz or Marmon 1963-)
(1) a 3/4 ton 1913-15, engine same as pass car EXCEPT destroked down to 251 instaed of 318, HP down to 25.6 from 32...car transaxle used, frome reinforced with gussets, heavier gauge crossmembers etc...duals...duals don't jibe with 3/4 Ton, but early for pneumatics??'...van and open delivert bofies...noted was stamped steel banjo rear axle housing with full floating shafts and 4" wide drums over internal brakes with S-cam actuation of roller-ended rigid brake shoes...
(2) separate listing for 3/4 Ton Delivery 1912-16...32HP car motor, car transaxle...gas tank placed "outside of the seat panel"...no mention frame changes, ni mention duals.Sounds like could be actually one vehicle line, but Mroz usually pretty reliable......
 

Monsonmotors

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/22/2020
I have to think this Marmon Car front axle just happened to get bolted to an unrelated same-era frame. The even earlier Marmon truck possibilities just seem very unlikely.
 

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