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McCormick Deering 22-36 in Tennessee

rwood64083

Registered
New to Smokstak. I stumbled on this website whilst researching carburetor issues for the newest member to my tractor family, a 1929 McCormick Deering 22-36. I'm not new to tractors but this is my first steel wheel iron. First order of business... get it running. I believe once I get the carb issue addressed, Betsy should fire up. Next order of business, if all seems to be in running order, is getting her ready for a vintage tractor pull in Eagleville TN in September. Only 25 miles from the house.

I look forward to learning the navigation of this site and learning more about this quickly developing fever I've contracted.

I like posting photos and photo comments. Who doesn't like photos, right? Here's a couple shots of Betsy when I drug her home last weekend and also a shot of my 1962 Ford 4000 I use around the small acreage we have. I fear I'm going to need a few more old tractors and a larger shop.











 

Steve Kunz

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Thats a nice old McCormick Deering, hopefully it does not take much to get it going.
That sure is a nice trailer you have it on! I would really like to have one like that.... some day.
Welcome to the Stak.
 

Tony Thompson

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
09/18/2019
Nice Find,
If this machine has not run in some time, it may be a good idea to hand oil the hell out of it prior to attempted start up.
Pull the valve cover and generously oil the valve stems, rocker arms and let several pumps of oil run down the push rods to flood the lifters and cam lobs. This will help avoid a dry start that could scuff things up.
Remove the block side covers and squirt oil onto each side of each rod and main bearings. Are the rod dipper trays holding full of oil?
Sometimes water will stand in the dipper tray sections and rust holes will form so that the tray that the swinging rod and bearing passes through does not hold oil anymore. You can solder the corroded dipper tray holes shut rather easily so they hold a puddle of oil again. Make sure the oil pump is pumping the dipper trays full of oil via the lines running from the pump to the dipper reservoirs.
The I.H.C 10-20, 15-30 are good early designs and the 22-36 is a real strong old horse that you can have a lot of fun with on a budget.
Thanks for posting and good luck!
Tony
 

rwood64083

Registered
Thats a nice old McCormick Deering, hopefully it does not take much to get it going.
That sure is a nice trailer you have it on! I would really like to have one like that.... some day.
Welcome to the Stak.
Thanks Steve. I feel confident I'll have her running in short order once I get the carb issue addressed.

Funny story about the trailer. I headed to KC to visit family pulling my 16 foot utility trailer with 3500 lb axles. Knowing I was going to be headed towards Iowa after leaving the KC area to look at that tractor, I was concerned the 16 footer wouldn't make it back to Nashville without blown tires or bent axles under the weight on the 22-36. But didn't have much choice as the 16 footer was the only option I had. While in KC I did some trailer shopping and found pretty much what I was looking for at Coopers Trailers in Oak Grove Mo. 27ft + 5ft dovetail on 10k lb axles and dual wheels. If I was going to splurge and get a gooseneck, why not get what I want. Trailer weighs approx 8k lbs and pulls great. As for the 16 ft utility trailer... it's waiting for me to come pick it up just south of KC. I'm hoping to find a few loads to haul and justify the purchase of the new trailer.

---------- Post added at 01:01 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:58 AM ----------

Nice Find,
The I.H.C 10-20, 15-30 are good early designs and the 22-36 is a real strong old horse that you can have a lot of fun with on a budget.
Thanks for posting and good luck!
Tony
Thanks for the info and advice Tony. It helps a lot as it's going to take me some time learning the characteristics of this big piece of old history.
 

AUSSIE TD-40

Registered
Welcome to Smokstak:)

all good advice given above:cool:
make sure you have a clean gas tank
when you crank it just use halve up pulls and don't put your thumb over the handle, mine will start cold with 2 to 3 halve up pulls.
Better still if you have a 2nd tractor with a belt pully use it to turn it over so you can check and ajust while its turning over.

If you don't mind I would like to know the number off the tag please.

Jake.
 

Pat Bayer

Registered
Make sure it is lubricating the governor, you can probably pull the oil line that goes to the governor and blow air threw to see if it is plugged, I've worked on several that have been
 

rwood64083

Registered
Welcome to Smokstak:)

Better still if you have a 2nd tractor with a belt pully use it to turn it over so you can check and ajust while its turning over.

If you don't mind I would like to know the number off the tag please.

Jake.

Unfortunately I do not have a second tractor with belt pulley... yet :D

Jake, the tag is no existent. I was told it was assumed to be misplaced many, many, many years ago when the tractor was painted. I was pretty disappointed when I learned of this. But I did not plan on purchasing it with the intent to sell it, and the price was good so I decided to make the purchase. It will be with me for a very long time.

As far as numbers go, what I've found so far is a stamping in the right side of the block (116183) and a date embossed on the left side (5-21-29). From what I've read there should be some more numbers stamped on the block somewhere. I will continue to search.

A little more info that I know about Bertha:
*She was brought back to the states from Canada.
*As it's paint is falling apart I'm finding traces of red in many areas under the gray. I know the wheels were red but I'm talking about areas on sheet metal, body, engine, trans, etc. From my research I thought these earlier models were all gray.
*Engine is fitted with water pump assembly and what looks to be some form of radiator fan that has springs on the front of it.
*It's also fitted with a PTO shaft that sits up high on the back of the tractor. I didn't know this was an option (?).
*It has an aftermarket Robin brand intake and exhaust manifold (which are in good shape) and also Robin carburetor. The carb top that sits above the bowl which holds the float assembly is broken. Found a lot of great info on why aftermarket assemblies like this were installed. Very fascinating history on this stuff.

I will continue to update as I learn and do more on this ole girl.

I haven't looked yet but assume there is a Build section in this forum? If so, maybe I should start one.

Thanks for all the great info guys. It helps a lot. If I ever meet any of ya, I'll bring the beer.

Cheers!
 

rwood64083

Registered
Okay, I'm starting to understand this. And where this thread was moved to. Thank you to the moderator for the thread move.

When I have more time I'll be happy to do more digging and see what all I can find that this forum had to offer.
 

rwood64083

Registered
A few more photos:
Date on left side of block.
Stamped numbers on right side of block.
Robin exhaust and intake manifolds.
Robin carburetor.
Broken bowl cover.









 

FWurth

One Millionth Post
Last Subscription Date
07/29/2019
Likely the float would stick ocassionally and they would hammer on it to free it, I'd say they hit it a bit too hard once too often. Might find a replacement up north as they were quite popular there. Also other conventional carburetors will readily fit on that manifold set up. F.J.W.
 

Wayne Riedlinger

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
My old 15-30 has the Robin manifold on it but I took the Robin carb off and put a marvel carb on. I want switch that one out and put a carb from a 44 massey on it. I like the old mcormick deering tractors. They broke a lot of land around here back in the day.
 

rwood64083

Registered
My old 15-30 has the Robin manifold on it but I took the Robin carb off and put a marvel carb on. I want switch that one out and put a carb from a 44 massey on it. I like the old mcormick deering tractors. They broke a lot of land around here back in the day.
Much appreciated info. Will start researching MF 44 carbs to find out what they are and locate one.

Besides the bowl top being broken, the other problem with this Robin assembly is that it sticks out to the left of the engine compartment too much and the side curtain pushes on it. Hopefully a different configuration carb will sit inside the compartment a tad bit more.

---------- Post added at 11:41 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:38 AM ----------

Also, I'm not a fan of the hole that was cut in the hood to allow for the upright exhaust from the Robin manifold. Something I'll look into alternatives later.
 

FWurth

One Millionth Post
Last Subscription Date
07/29/2019
There were other aftermarket set ups for those tractors other than Robbin. They all put the exhaust thru the top of the hood to get the heat away from the motor area. That was a must when getting away from kerosene fuel and burning gas. By converting to gas with the proper manifold and carb and bumping the RPMs a bit they were able to boost the out put nearly 30% Many of these old powered up Deerings were in service well into the 50s being replaced with much newer and modern units available then. Both of mine were still in use yet in 1960! F.J.W.
 

rwood64083

Registered
There were other aftermarket set ups for those tractors other than Robbin. They all put the exhaust thru the top of the hood to get the heat away from the motor area. That was a must when getting away from kerosene fuel and burning gas. By converting to gas with the proper manifold and carb and bumping the RPMs a bit they were able to boost the out put nearly 30% Many of these old powered up Deerings were in service well into the 50s being replaced with much newer and modern units available then. Both of mine were still in use yet in 1960! F.J.W.
I'm soaking up every bit of information you all share with me. Some of it I've learned researching this model tractor. I particularly like the info shared from some of the guys old enough that have operated these things in the many years past.

I turn 50 years old in a few months. I remember as a teenager thinking I was born out of my time. Always had an interest in things from the past. I currently have a 55 Bel-Air two door hardtop that's needing restoration and a nicely restored 1965 Harley Electra Glide. I feel this 22-36 will be the first of many older tractors. I'm gonna need a bigger shop :D
 

rennkafer

Registered
As far as numbers go, what I've found so far is a stamping in the right side of the block (116183) and a date embossed on the left side (5-21-29). From what I've read there should be some more numbers stamped on the block somewhere. I will continue to search.

A little more info that I know about Bertha:
*She was brought back to the states from Canada.
*As it's paint is falling apart I'm finding traces of red in many areas under the gray. I know the wheels were red but I'm talking about areas on sheet metal, body, engine, trans, etc. From my research I thought these earlier models were all gray.
*Engine is fitted with water pump assembly and what looks to be some form of radiator fan that has springs on the front of it.
*It's also fitted with a PTO shaft that sits up high on the back of the tractor. I didn't know this was an option (?).
*It has an aftermarket Robin brand intake and exhaust manifold (which are in good shape) and also Robin carburetor. The carb top that sits above the bowl which holds the float assembly is broken. Found a lot of great info on why aftermarket assemblies like this were installed. Very fascinating history on this stuff.
On my '28 15-30 the block number matches the tag number.
Mine was also a re-import from Canada...
According to everything I can find they were grey with red wheels up into '36. So all the Mc-D 15-30s and 22-36's.
The water pump was a new addition to the 22-36 for '29. My '28 15-30 doesn't have one. Yours should also have a single disc clutch as opposed to the multi-disc on my '28.
The PTO is, from all accounts, quite rare to find installed, they all have the shaft to the back of the tractor but most just have a cover over it. I'd really love to see some detail pics of that, I may want to machine one for mine.
My '28 also was converted to gas operation with an upright manifold (MIA though, not Robin). I've been told that the MIA and Robin manifolds were both reasonably common in Canada. Mine has a poorly adapted Zenith carb from a Ford Model B on it. When the engine is out and rebuilt that will likely change so that the governor is properly working.

I'm looking forward to watching your progress!
 

rwood64083

Registered
Thanks Rennkafer. I'll get photos of the PTO shaft area for you tomorrow (hopefully I'll remember).

I thought all those year McDs were grey with red wheels also. I suppose it may have been grey, then someone painted it red, and later on in it's life someone painted it grey again. I'm not seeing traces of grey under the red yet, just on top of the red paint. I'll keep digging.

The engine number and the ID tag have the same number on yours? Interesting. Maybe there's still some signs of hope that I can have a reprint made.

My plan is to keep the steel wheels on it and have road bands made. I thought about removing the cleats and installing rubber tread. But I think it takes away from the nostalgic look of the tractor. What I'd really like to find is another set of front and rear rims. I have a vision :D
 

rennkafer

Registered
Ya, mine is on rubber with the original centers welded to rims. I'd love to have steel to put it on but the few I've seen for sale were expensive and in the midwest which is a big shipping bill to the Northwest where I am.

No hurry on the pics, I'm still setting up shop in the house we bought last summer and the tractor is still on the way apart. It'll be a while before I can do much home machining.
 
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