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McCulloch identify

shiftlessguy

Registered
Picked up a 50s saw fer $45.Has good compression and thats about as far as ill get for now.Other engines to finish.Only numbers i could find was 53683 with a B abit farther away by the gas cap
Ill assume its a serial number.There was a cool model plane engine there to but was locked up and somewhat incomplete.Be dangerous gettin that one runnin!
 

Attachments

K-Tron

Registered
That looks just like my model 33 McCulloch. It has a very strange carburetor behind that intake screen. I do not think I could have passed that drone engine up if it were for sale for a reasonable price. Its cool enough that you could display it as is.

Chris
 

gdstew

Registered
That is one of the many 33/35 series of saws. I think it is probably a mid 33 series saw based upon the size of the air filter and the location of the oiler button. That "intake screen" is actually the filter, missing all of the coating! Those were a very rugged saw but the carb was very cantankerous. There are thousands of those saws still out there. Unfortunately, only a handful actually running.
 

GADavis

Registered
Age
80
I was a McCulloch dealer when those saws were still being used around here. Most of them were used for cutting pulp wood and not for logging. They could be equipped with a bow and it was just what was needed for cutting pulpwood like the used to do for hauling crosswise on pulpwood truck racks in the days before they started using tree length wood.
That is a plain 33 model. The later ones were known as Super 33 and then the last series were the 35. There was a model 33-B also. They used a large 1/2" pitch chain on the gear drive transmission and the sprockets were reversible. The air filter/screen was a flocked wire piece that was held in by a wire bail held with screws. The carburetor on that saw had a diaphragm that would get hard and then the steel ball used for the inlet valve would sometimes stick in the seat and they wouldn't crank or run.
The carburetor was a true night mare but when right they were a great cutting saw. The throttle did not use a butterfly, it had a sliding gate on the outside of the carburetor body that would get worn and then would try to run wide open all the time.The flat lever on the left side of the carburetor is the high speed mixture adjustment and it you could not get enough range of adjustment you lifted it up and moved it to get another bite. They had a tough gear drive transmission and clutch. They were very few that survived the hired help tinkering with them They were a radical departure from what they were used to seeing.
I really hated working on them with a purple passion.The few people that understood them got very good life and service from them. They were available with a brush cutting attachment also.
 

GADavis

Registered
Age
80
Does it have a hole in the shroud for a 1/4" timing pin?Some of the older saws had a hole in the shroud you put the timing pin in to lock the flywheel in the right spot and adjusted the points till the light just went out.
 

shiftlessguy

Registered
I have shroud off at the moment but ill look around,I did it with out shroud on as im cleanin it up a bit and just rocked flywheel back and forth,just to get it close,probably have too much gap rite now
 
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