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McDonald spi

muzzery

Registered
Hi all. I dragged home a McDonald spi model today. It will have to sit a while before I can play with it. A few parts missing but nothing that can’t be dealt with I hope.
 

Attachments

cobbadog

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It looks quite tidy too Muzz. It will be a good project.

It appears that Smokstak is becomming a home for McDonalds at the moment, 3 threads at one time.
 

cobbadog

Registered
Hate to be the bearer of bad news but they were not made that way. Start squirting some diesel on them every time you walk past them, it might help. It is a process you won't forget in a hurry but I will say that the second one came out easier than the first. Whether that was by skill or luck I don't know but that is how it went.
Hope you found a nice secluded place for the SPI to 'hide' while waiting his turn for attention.
 

asw20

Registered
I note the engine number. I wonder if the numbers were sequential across all production, like R&T (ISTBC on that), or just per model.
The reason is I would have thought the SPI superceded the SE (which I have), but my SE's are either side of that number, 2007 and 3662.
Or was the SPI an upgrade model available at the same time for a little extra money?

BTW Cobba - I have caused you to upset the purists again - that oil primer I sent you is an earlier style than yours would have had (identical from a distance, quite different in the base casting when compared adjacent, this assumes both of mine were original to their engines.)

Jarrod.
 

cobbadog

Registered
Ray Gillett has all the McDonald info and he could answer that question about sequential numbering. The primer you sent me has the same base as what was on the engine but what I had was a long way from being usful. Same shape and bolt centres and oil line connection so it could not be that different. Now having heard that I wonder if it will be picked up at a rally when ever another one happens. Sure miss our outtings.
On numbers, I found what could be a date stamp on the top of the engines hopper behind the injector. Well I think it is a date stamp for month and year.
 

Combustor

Registered
Hello muzzery,
Great old motor you have there, I have one of my own that I rescued some years ago now. Starts first swing of the handle.
The surest way to remove badly stuck and rusted keys is to consider the old keys disposable , and approach the job along the following lines.
Drill a line of small holes across the top of the key as close to the flywheel as possible. Drive a small chisel under the end of the key and snap it out of the keyway.
Take the old key piece, or a new short piece of the same cross section and scribe diagonals across the end to find the centre. Punch mark this centre and find a friend with a lathe. who can centre it in a 4 jaw chuck and drill through its length with a drill size half or two thirds of the key thickness.
Clamp the new guide piece in the keyway, and using a new sharp drill, (long series if needed) carefully drill through the length of the stuck key. Repeat the process on the 2nd key before you lose that guide.
Take another new sharp drill, one size smaller than key thickness, (long one if needed) carefully drill through the pilot hole and the key will collapse easily.
If still tight, place a wood block under the big end bearing and rock the flywheel hard back against it.
Can probably push flywheel on a little further to allow cleanup of the shaft.
Measure the keyway in flywheel to determine its taper. Should have been made to a British Standard which you can look up. Someone here will know. You can then have keys milled to correct dimensions, but add a few thou. to depth to allow final hand fitting, (which is why the old guys were called fitters).
Good luck with the project. Kind regards,
Combustor
 

muzzery

Registered
Thank you guys.
sometimes i wonder if a thousand litre crc tub would be handy- just dump the whole thing in to soak haha
 

hceeB

Registered
Thank you guys.
sometimes i wonder if a thousand litre crc tub would be handy- just dump the whole thing in to soak haha
Well I am thinking of making a 1000 litre molasses bath, have a few projects that would benefit from a good soaking in one, the cost would be negligible compared to any other medium and I have had good results from using a molasses bath.
You could drop that whole engine in and leave it for a week or so, would be much easier to dismantle.

Regards Geoff.
 

asw20

Registered
Thank you guys.
sometimes i wonder if a thousand litre crc tub would be handy- just dump the whole thing in to soak haha
I have started this myself with molasses at about 10%. Step one is 2/3 of a plastic 44 gallon drum. A lister D is the next thing to go in after I get the flywheel off. I have an IBC container which is going to lose its top in the coming months - I have a very rusty straight 8 to go in.

Jarrod.
 

muzzery

Registered
I guess it doesn’t matter but what about any salvageable bearings and bushes, the molasses would attack soft metal wouldn’t it?
good idea though, an ibc tank.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Thank you guys.
sometimes i wonder if a thousand litre crc tub would be handy- just dump the whole thing in to soak haha
I have a drum full of synthetic auto transmission oil I got off my mate who has a heap of trucks with Allison autos in them. That stuff gets into everywhere. It might be worth asking your local truck service place for some synthetic auto oil.

Oi Ian, we got our electrolysis working off a thrown away house solar panel now. Gees it works well. I put in a heap of stuff each afternoon when the sun is virtually gone to bed and by the next arvo the job's done. I've been busy cleaning up some old spanners and tools.
We've had virtually no cloudy days for months now. Some rain would be really, really good.
 

Scotty 2

Registered
I note the engine number. I wonder if the numbers were sequential across all production
Hello Jarrod.
The SPI was the start of a new sequence.
The Super Diesel engines seem to have had a sequence ('18-'69)
The CPI's seem to have a new sequence as does the F series blah, blah blah.
The book A.H. McDonald Industrial Pioneer is a fantastic read an a good reference source for McDonald products.
Cheers Scott
 

muzzery

Registered
I have a drum full of synthetic auto transmission oil I got off my mate who has a heap of trucks with Allison autos in them. That stuff gets into everywhere. It might be worth asking your local truck service place for some synthetic auto oil.

Oi Ian, we got our electrolysis working off a thrown away house solar panel now. Gees it works well. I put in a heap of stuff each afternoon when the sun is virtually gone to bed and by the next arvo the job's done. I've been busy cleaning up some old spanners and tools.
We've had virtually no cloudy days for months now. Some rain would be really, really good.
What a top idea!
 

asw20

Registered
Thanks Scotty.
As to molasses vs electrolysis, I use both, depending on how nasty something is.

Muzz: The only thing I've had molasses attack is case hardening.

Jarrod.
 

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