Millers Falls Power Hacksaw

locknut

New member
Hi Guys,
I have just got hold of a Millers Falls power hacksaw and was hoping that someone on this site could date it for me and tell me something about it please.
It looks complete to me - it did come with an electric motor which I have taken off. I am hoping to use a stationary engine to power it.
Any help or advice would be appreciated.Thank you.
Kev.


 

Scott

Member
Re: Millers Falls power hacksaw

Can't tell from your pictures, but it should disengage the saw after the cut is finished.
 

locknut

New member
Re: Millers Falls power hacksaw

Hi Guys,
Thank you for your quick replies.
Jim - I will certainly check that site out,looks interesting.
Scott - I have seen pictures of other power saws with a disengage device, like a type of clutch, but my model does not appear to have one and there does not seem to be any fixing points for one.
Kev
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Re: Millers Falls power hacksaw

Can't tell from your pictures, but it should disengage the saw after the cut is finished.
Actually, there are two and possibly three versions of these out there. Looking very similar but of two one has only a "manual start-stop handle" and the other has a "slider plate" near the crank which the saw frame catches and stops the saw.

The earlier manual shut off version is shown in US Patent 466929 (Jan 12, 1892 H.D. Lanfair) and the "slider shut-off version" is shown at US Patent 502996 (Aug 8, 1893 H.L. Pratt)

Another version is shown at US Patent 935665 (1903 H.D. Lanfair) which instead of a dog-clutch (which are wont to break) the trip mechanism moves a tight-loose belt arrangement. I've not seen any of these in real life.

I have the earlier version. I can see that an auto-shutoff would be of advantage.

Another thing which changes depending on your saw is the imprint on the crank disk which shows RPM. Mine (early) says "40 RPM" Some say "42 RPM" others say "45 RPM."

Joe K
 

locknut

New member
Re: Millers Falls power hacksaw

Hi Joe,
Thanks for you interesting comments.
I attach a further photo of my saw - the v belt attached comes up from the pulley that the fitted electric motor powered and attaches ,as can be seen, to the pulley driving the saw.There is a smaller pulley on the inside of this which does not appear to do anything, but clearly it was connected to something but I have no idea what! Anyone know?




The crank disc shows - '40 revs per minute'.
There is no sliding plate on mine and I cannot see any device that would act as an auto stop or even a manual stop.Can anyone see one?
Any help or advice would be appreciated.Thank you.
kev.
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Re: Millers Falls power hacksaw

Given the lack of a "slider" on the saw bed, or any track to take it, I would say your saw is a modified early version. The "40 RPM" supports this.

However, I note some differences which may support a "slider shutoff" saw or at least a "transitional" saw.

One difference I see is your saw arm is lacking the "counterbalance boss." On my saw the arm counterbalance is below the saw bed and consists of a rod, stout spring, and hand tension adjustment knob/handle. A hole is drilled in the base and bearing bracket to hang this spring/tensioner from the counterbalance attachment boss. Later saws have a weight slider mounted "above" the saw frame in various configurations. So this whole counterbalance issue may have been a design flaw addressed in stages/iterations/degrees of success.

Note also yours says "Millers Falls, Mass USA" where mine says only "Millers Falls Mass." This might put your saw incrementally later as market acceptance worldwide was anticipated.

Also, mine has a place for an "arm spring detent" which can hold the arm up while work is being placed (detent & spring in a box here nearby). Yours is missing the place. Perhaps this consistent with the adjustable counterbalance yours should have in an above frame slider/weight?



Here is the equivalent to your view on mine.



You will note the start handle is normally straight up engaging closely the bearing yoke. To start the action the handle is moved "down" to the peg on the saw arm. The start handle in moving down rotates its circular cam the ramp of which moves the handle and pulley away from the bearing yoke to the right. In moving right, a square tooth-clutch is engaged on the outboard side of the pulley connecting the pulley to the shaft - a spring returns the pulley to "free wheel position" when the start handle is returned vertical.

The design is wont to break. My jaw clutch has been braze repaired at least twice before I got it.

Take a look at your bearing yoke and see if there are "indents" for the cam/start handle action. This might tell you more of what your saw was originally?

My flat belt pulley is 13-3/8 diameter by 2-3/8 face (2" belt?) and has five spokes. Ebay offers similar.

Good luck,
Joe K
 

Attachments

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locknut

New member
Re: Millers Falls power hacksaw

Hi Joe,
Thanks for the further informative information - this is certainly an interesting area of research - which makes buying old vintage machinery so intetesting.
I attach a close up photo of the end of a bar which can be seen in my first photo - when you lift the saw up (by hand) ie disengage it from the cutting possition - it locates in the notch thus keeping it in the raised possition - if that makes sense!To engage the saw in the cutting possition,you lift the saw up to disengage the 'notch' and then lower onto the metal to be cut.



I cannot find any indents in the bearing yoke and no fixing possitions for a counter balance.
I intend showing this saw at vintage rallies.I will be powering it with a Lister D.
Leaving it in as origenal state as possible, given the pulley set up on the saw I will be putting a 15" v belt pulley on the stub shaft ( on the opposite end from the origenal electric motor pulley) which should give a saw speed of 40 rpm.
Interestingly ref the vice set up the fixing that the tightening screw goes through and then tightens on the vice jaw has no thread in it so in its present set up the tightening screw does nothing!There must have been some form of nut between the screw and the jaws to tighten up on.
All the best,
Kev.
 

Joe K

Subscriber
Re: Millers Falls power hacksaw

The more I think of your saw and pix the more I'm thinking yours of the "slider" ilk.

But I don't have any detail or pix of the slider mechanism to reference (other than the patent illustration) and pix online of the later saw are difficult to reverse engineer from.

Best would be to see (or buy) another saw which may be more complete? They are out there for relatively cheap money.

Or - study out those you see and "replicate" parts as required.

Even getting close is worthy - and would have been done in a time-period shop simply to "get-er-done."

This is what we "keepers of the mechanical flame" do. We celebrate ingeniousness more than originality. Although its nice to have both if you can.

Joe K
 
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