• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron machinery, register and join us. When you register on Smokstak, please give complete answers and fill in the blanks. - IF YOU ARE ON WIRELESS OR SATELLITE, ENTER YOUR CITY AND STATE! NO ZIPCODES! All registrations are manually approved.

My first project: Briggs and Stratton 4

CycleKartBow

Registered
Today I met the mythical engine shaman of the desert, Buster Brown, and he showed me around his spread. At the end of the visit, when I was getting ready to head out, he offered me a project to start my collection/restoration hobby with at a price I couldn't refuse.

We are unsure exactly what model it is, but it has a cast iron shroud and the tank has a 4 Briggs and Stratton decal.

I brought it home and after dinner decided to hose it off a bit to remove some of the vintage desert deposits and maybe find some markings to identify it.

No luck on the ID, so maybe someone can give me a better idea of what this critter is.

Interesting to note, after we loaded it in my truck, I spun the starter cup and we spoke how the compression seemed a little weak, however, after hosing it off, I spun the starter cup again and saw a lot of bubbles coming out from around the spark plug... The compression may be better than we thought.
 

Attachments

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I'm thinking Model A. But just a guess. I would guess that the "4" was originally "4 Cycle".
 

CycleKartBow

Registered
Vanman,

Thanks for the reply, and I agree with you...

I just start searching the internet through brute force and ignorance and found this:


Model A
Horizontal shaft,4 cycle,round fuel tank,float carburetor
oil bath air filter
horse power 2.45 @ 3200 rpm.
shipping weight94 lbs.


Looks like my project
 

s100

Registered
For reasons I can't quite put my finger on, I'm thinking a model B rather than an A. Just seems bigger somehow. Don't be overly concerned at this point about low compression. The oil drips down over time and leaves everything bone-dry. Once the oil gets up and splashing around, the compression often comes back with a vengeance. That's a nice engine to start your hobby with.
 

CycleKartBow

Registered
Thanks for the replies.

There are 2 holes where the ID plate should be, and the plate is history.

I've been doing a bit to it today. Got the tank off, which has some dents, but the most concerning one is the hit on the end cap seam.

Also pulled the small, non-original warp around heat shield off . I plane to remove the shroud next and pull the flywheel to see what shape the magnito is in.

Sorry for the play-by-play, as this this something you all have probably read/seen a million times.
 

Attachments

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Oh, don't apologize! This stuff is why we're all here! :D

I don't know why those cylinder shields are so often missing! But otherwise yours looks in quite good condition.

I don't have an A, but do have a B, and it has the wrong carb- and someone notched the cast iron blower housing to make it fit, it has the wrong- bastardized- gas tank bracket, no air cleaner, no breather cap, and it's been painted in carnival colors! :rant:

I was thinking yours was an A since it looks more "squat" than my B. Here's a video of mine earning it's living during a power failure, you can get a good look at the engine towards the end:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueywqrf8xP0
 

CycleKartBow

Registered
Vanman,

Great running engine. Does your blown shroud tag say Kohler on it?

I have been cleaning as I pull parts to check it out.

I was surprised to pull the spark plug and for grins I put the plug on the head, connected the wire, and gave the flywheel a spin and received a spark.

The Autolite B-7 has seen better days, but a spark was a good sign. Also cleans the 1/4" of crust the started life as gasoline a few years ago.
 

Attachments

CycleKartBow

Registered
I meant to say Blower Shroud...

But since there is no Edit option....

Now I realize it is a Kohler Generator with a Briggs Model B Engine?
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Now I realize it is a Kohler Generator with a Briggs Model B Engine?
Yes. At that time- in the 1940's- I believe that Kohler was yet to develop their own small air cooled engines. The ads for this Kohler plant are quite amusing in that they show very little of the engine, so that it is not readily apparent that it's a Briggs. :O

So, does your engine have six or seven head bolts?

Keith
 

Everett Hayden

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Today I met the mythical engine shaman of the desert, Buster Brown, and he showed me around his spread. At the end of the visit, when I was getting ready to head out, he offered me a project to start my collection/restoration hobby with at a price I couldn't refuse.

We are unsure exactly what model it is, but it has a cast iron shroud and the tank has a 4 Briggs and Stratton decal.

I brought it home and after dinner decided to hose it off a bit to remove some of the vintage desert deposits and maybe find some markings to identify it.

No luck on the ID, so maybe someone can give me a better idea of what this critter is.

Interesting to note, after we loaded it in my truck, I spun the starter cup and we spoke how the compression seemed a little weak, however, after hosing it off, I spun the starter cup again and saw a lot of bubbles coming out from around the spark plug... The compression may be better than we thought.

You have no idea how right you are. Desert shaman, yeah, Buster has forgotten more than I will ever know. Nice Model A find. I love the way they run.:D
 

CycleKartBow

Registered
Everett,

I believe you on that! Buster is quite a walking encyclopedia of engine knowledge.

I am planning to pull the wheel and give the electronics a look, that I need to clean the carb, fuel lines, drain the oil....

hope I can give that a go today/
 

s100

Registered
CKB,

Is that an iron flywheel painted silver, or is it a zinc flywheel? If it's zinc, and you have spark, I would leave it alone! Those flywheels have a cast-in iron hub sleeve, and I wouldn't want to needlessly provoke that interface if I didn't have to. I have an older Briggs (FH, I think, slant fin, zinc carburetor, no tag, doggone it, and that hub sleeve is a bit loose. Somebody in the past (I've owned the engine well over 50 years) peened the zinc to tighten the interface, but it's still kinda wobbly. I just hope I don't have to ever take the flywheel off.

Make of this what you will. As to your play by play, keep on keepin' on and don't apologize, that's what we're here for. And someday someone new will be working on an engine like yours, and will find the information helpful.
 

CycleKartBow

Registered
I'm betting its Zinc, now that you mention it.

I was able to get the starter cup off, just like the manual says (3/8 extension through the holes, couple raps of a dead blw on the extension on the left side) and it came loose.

I hear what you are saying about the cast iron bushing in the zinc flywheel and leaving it be, however, there are a couple issues I need t address...

the engine is covered by a thick, caked, dirt/oil/prehistoric crud that I want to get cleaned off, and I can see it behind the flywheel and well...
And the Spark plug lead is in rough shape and will probably need to be replaced.

However, if I can't get the flywheel to come off, I guess I'll do my best with what I have access too.


Bow
 

CycleKartBow

Registered
Man, I don't know... I know what you mean about Historical Gun . But in AZ, where it is 107 at the moment, I am a bit concerned about air cooling...


Bow
 

CycleKartBow

Registered
Newbie question:

Where does one find the rubber seals for things like the glass filter bowl, etc?

or is there a suitable substitute material to use?
 

s100

Registered
"Where does one find the rubber seals for things like the glass filter bowl, etc?"

I will look forward to getting the answer to that one myself. I always make my own gaskets for the fuel bowl, usually out of composition or cork. I tried to use an o-ring but had no luck.Keeping it in place without squirming away was too much for me.

Reproduction filters are available at low prices. I bought some from a mail order dealer and I think they were something like $7. I won't mention the dealer, because they proved to be disreputable and not someone I could recommend. I'm sure there are other dealers, though, who sell these inexpensive replacements.
 

GaryH

Subscriber
Age
73
Last Subscription Date
12/26/2019
I also use the composition or cork. NAPA has that material.
Due to advice on here I bought an OLFA circle cutter a while back, ebay I think, and it works real good for making the sediment bowl and other gaskets.
 
Top