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Need help removing flywheel (Lauson RSC 591)

Newman1980

Registered
I am restoring a Lauson RSC 591 that was attached to an old lawn edger (pics below). It was missing the gas tank so I couldn't test it as is but it does spark and there is good compression.

I have been disassembling the motor and I have been able to remove everything but the flywheel and crank shaft. The flywheel is on a threaded shaft but I cannot get it to budge as far as trying to screw it off.

Also I haven't been able to find any info/pictures online about the edger itself so if anyone recognises it, please educate me.

This is my first restoration so please take pity on me. And thanks in advance for the help.
 

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John Newman Jr.

Subscriber
Age
64
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Hello and welcome to the ‘Stak.
The flywheel has a tapered hole mating with the tapered crankshaft. There is a key to maintain the ignition timing. If you have the rope pulley removed (it does unscrew) then the flywheel pulls straight off. Usual method is to smack the end of the crank with an aluminum or brass mallet. This will usually pop it off. Don’t hit it with a steel hammer. You will bang up the end of the threads and/or mushroom the end. Don’t be tempted to pry on it. The magneto backing plate is a thin casting and is kinda delicate.
Keep us posted on your progress. Let us know if you have any problems. Take pictures.
Good luck. Have fun.
 

K-Tron

Registered
That is a cute little edger, I cannot say that I have seen one with a Lauson RSC before. Since the PTO side of the engine is unobstructed, after you remove the rope sheave from the end of the crankshaft, I would hit the PTO end of the crankshaft with a 2lb brass lump hammer square on once or twice. The shock induced by the hammer blow will transfer through the crankshaft and should pop the flywheel off without a prybar behind the flywheel. If the flywheel is stuck, your flywheel should have two threaded holes for a puller to be mounted.

Chris
 

Newman1980

Registered
Thanks for the tips guys. I will gently bang the hell out of it tomorrow and post progress lol. For now everything has been going smoothly.
 

Newman1980

Registered
So I bought a wheel puller kit and with all the bolt options that came with it, none of them fit. But I discovered a little hidden gem called Home Depot and they had the right size.

The flywheel is off and I'm proceeding with the tear down. :beer:
 

Newman1980

Registered
All done with the engine. I have a gas tank coming in the mail. When it gets here we'll see if I tightened the bolts enough lol. I posted some picks of the process. I'll post more when the whole edger is complete.
 

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John Newman Jr.

Subscriber
Age
64
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Looks good so far. There should be a cap on the crankcase breather. I have used an appropriately sized freeze plug before. Probably have to slightly modify one for a good fit.
 

Newman1980

Registered
Looks good so far. There should be a cap on the crankcase breather. I have used an appropriately sized freeze plug before. Probably have to slightly modify one for a good fit.
I was wondering about that because the hole is threaded but I have zero background in mechanics or engines. Thanks for the intel. I'll find a freeze plug and if I have any questions I know who to ask 👍
 

Newman1980

Registered
Very nice job, slick paint. What kind of paint and prep?
Thanks Charley. I used Rustoleum Heat-Resistant primer, paint, and clear coat. I'm not sure if Heat-Resistant was overkill but I figured it's an engine so why not. This green was the only green they had in Heat-Resistant spray paint but I think it worked out well. The can doesn't specify the exact color though.

I started by scraping all the thick mud and oil off of everything. Then, I degreased all the parts and scrubbed them with a wire brush. Next, I stripped the paint with CitruStrip. I proceeded to wire wheel everything. I gave the parts a coat of primer and 2 coats of paint and clear. And that's it.
 

Charley K

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
10/09/2019
Thanks Charley. I used Rustoleum Heat-Resistant primer, paint, and clear coat. I'm not sure if Heat-Resistant was overkill but I figured it's an engine so why not. This green was the only green they had in Heat-Resistant spray paint but I think it worked out well. The can doesn't specify the exact color though.

I started by scraping all the thick mud and oil off of everything. Then, I degreased all the parts and scrubbed them with a wire brush. Next, I stripped the paint with CitruStrip. I proceeded to wire wheel everything. I gave the parts a coat of primer and 2 coats of paint and clear. And that's it.
I think the color goes well with the engine. I do a lot of painting, mostly base and clear and single stage urethane with a gun. I think your spray can job turned out great. You have got me inspired to try on the next small job. Gun cleaning is not one of my favorite pass times. Thanks for the post. CK
 

Newman1980

Registered
I have combed the internet for hours on multiple days but I cannot find an edger that even closely resembles this one. Does anyone have any late 1940s or early 1950s Montgomery Wards catalogues that this edger might be listed in?
 

Newman1980

Registered
Looks good so far. There should be a cap on the crankcase breather. I have used an appropriately sized freeze plug before. Probably have to slightly modify one for a good fit.
John can you post a pic of the freeze plug set-up, if you have one available? I'm soaking the gas tank in vinegar for a few days so I figure while I wait I can work on the plug.
 

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