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Needle Scalers

cobbadog

Registered
HAs anyone used a needle scaler on removing thick paint? The ones I am looking at are air operated and I want to clean up the 20 layers of old paint off the coaming on Lorry and then it will also clean up the rusty bits too.
 

slip knot

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/27/2019
I use mine for weld prep. works really well to get the rusty crud out before welding and the get the slag off the weld afterward. If rust/paint are really tight it isn't very efficient, works best with loose, flaky stuff.
 

JoeCB

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/19/2020
Toms right on with that advice. If you were ever in the Navy, on the deck crew, you would be intimately familiar with both needle scalers and "deck crawlers" .

Joe B
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
HAs anyone used a needle scaler on removing thick paint? The ones I am looking at are air operated and I want to clean up the 20 layers of old paint off the coaming on Lorry and then it will also clean up the rusty bits too.
I'm not sure what "coaming on a lorry" is, but I have experience removing paint with a needle scaler. If working on iron or steel, the thicker the metal the better it works, thinner materials it just does not seem to work as well. Frozen paint shatters better than warm paint. Use eye protection, respirator, hearing protection, after a few hours you will get in the zone:LOL:
 

Scotty 2

Registered
Hello Cobba
I wouldn't be without one but as mentioned, good for very hard or loose paint or rusty stuff. I don't know how it'll go on Lorry's rails. You could do a test and see what happens if you bash the sides with a small ball pein hammer. If the paint comes off easy in chunks then the scaler will work. A word of warning though, they need a good supply of air. a 12 or 15 cfm compressor will be continuously working to try (and failing) to keep up with the scaler if you get fair dinkum with the scaler.
Personally I'd be getting some sand blasting quotes.

Cheers Scott
 
Last edited:

cobbadog

Registered
Thank you to everyone who has answered. Dalmatian, Wayne is correct that is exactly what we call a coaming rail, it is an "I" beam and some are a "C" section and over all the life of Lorry he keeps getting layers of paint on there and has built up and rust is forming underneath. So I would like to start a fresh and go back to bare metal and begin again with a metal undercoat, then top coat.
Scotty, I have not lost the phone number for the wet sandblaster to come back and do this but I am just seeking out the info first. May well still end up with one of these scalers. As for CFM I have 2 x 10 or 8 cfm compressors and I have them connected to the one air line so in total should have it covered. If it is still not enough I don't mind stopping to watch the world go by as pressure builds up again.
 

AussieIron

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/04/2020
Hello Cobba
I wouldn't be without one but as mentioned, good for very hard or loose paint or rusty stuff. I don't know how it'll go on Lorry's rails. You could do a test and see what happens if you bash the sides with a small ball pein hammer. If the paint comes off easy in chunks then the scaler will work. A word of warning though, they need a good supply of air. a 12 or 15 cfm compressor will be continuously working to try (and failing) to keep up with the scaler if you get fair dinkum with the scaler.
Personally I'd be getting some sand blasting quotes.

Cheers Scott
Correct Scotty, use a lot of air. Bloody noisy too.
 

asw20

Registered
I'll second AussieIron's advice that they are noisy. Not as bad on thick, solid stuff, but on thinner / hollow section ye gods! Even the toughest he-man will want earmuffs.

Jarrod.
 

davob

Registered
HAs anyone used a needle scaler on removing thick paint? The ones I am looking at are air operated and I want to clean up the 20 layers of old paint off the coaming on Lorry and then it will also clean up the rusty bits too.
They are great for weld prep and scale removal but can be a bit hit and miss with paint.
If the paint is not well bonded, dry and flakey they work quite well but if the paint is well bonded to the surface and still has some plasticity about it then it tends to get a bit messy. Best option for paint in my opinion is blasting or that new fangled laser stripping technology if you can find someone to do it for a reasonable price

 

Inter Bloke

Registered
I wore one out in about five hours cleaning screens in a fertilizer shed ! I havn't replaced it yet, but I am going to because it works "brilliantly" ! Only useful on loose scaly surfaces and leaves a "pitted" type surface where the needles have been hitting, but still a very good tool to have in the kit !
 
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