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"New Sattley" 1 1/2 HP Engine

SteamachinesLD

Registered
Hi all,

Just picked up a 1 1/2 HP Sattley hit and miss engine (SN 77174). From what I understand it is a "New" Sattley due to its solid flywheels and being sold through the Montgomery Ward Company.

The engine is operational, runs off a Wico EK magneto, and also features a large drip oiler, belt pulley, and is mounted on a dolly.

Just a few questions to start this thread off:

1.) I was told by the owner that he uses gasoline with a lead additive. I'm assuming this is just "regular" gasoline in contrast to "unleaded" gasoline. What gas do other similar machines burn, and what should be used for this machine?

2.) What type of cylinder oil would work best? Any particular type of SAE oil? What do some of you folks use in your machines?

3.) As I understand it, serial numbers for Sattley engines 'went up in smoke.' Would I be able to date the machine using the Wico magneto serial number? Do the numbers for Wico EK mags still exist?

4.) Does anyone use anything besides water to cool their engines? I remember reading that some like to mix water and antifreeze in the water hopper. Is there anything better to use than just plain water (think preservation)?

5.) The machine has an older cosmetic restoration. It is currently a dark green/olive color. I plan to repaint the machine since the current paint isn't original. What paint have other Sattley engine owners used for their green? Should a good coat of primer be used too?

6.) How do you remove the brass lining from the Wico EK magneto? Is it just the four screws on the bottom of the device? Does the sparkplug wire disconnect from the magneto, and if so how is it removed?

All questions, comments, concerns, and advice are accepted and appreciated!:D More to come!

W. Dancey
 

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BobRR

Registered
These engines were never meant to run on leaded gas. When they were built lead wasn't being used yet. Gas back then was white gas(coleman fuel). Just run regular. The cheapest oil is better then anything back then. In summer run 30w in winter 20w. Multi grade wont hurt if thats all you have. Just run water and drain when done. Bob
 

Dick Graybill

Subscriber
Age
82
Last Subscription Date
07/26/2020
The WICO ek's were first used in late 1922 or 1923.
#4 I use only water and drain while engine is still warm.(dries and doesn't rust).
#6.Yes 4 screws let you slide band off and then front and back cover. Wire should come off with band.
 

stitchwizzard

Registered
Last Subscription Date
09/11/2016
Here is one of ours running. This is the "New Sattley" made by Nelson I believe.
A very cool engine and an easy starter for sure. We run 87 Pure gas, no Alcohol, in ours, water only as anti-freeze raises the boiling temp which helps keep it cool.
We also use 50 wt. in the summer in the oil cups so it doesn't run through the oil. The cotton wicking helps hold the oil in the cups also. Never had even a warm bearing Journal. 30 wt Non detergent in the oiler.

Here is a video link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhkDYd6Jc1c
Have fun and enjoy your Sattley!
Stitch
 

SteamachinesLD

Registered
Hi all,

Thanks for the responses so far.

Next question, does anyone have a photo of Sattley's original gastank setup and fuel delivery system?

From what I understand, the tank was mounted underneath the engine and incorporated a check valve in the fuel delivery system. The current setup does not have this, but rather a long plastic hose connected to the tank which is mounted on the skids (see photos in post 1).

Anywhere that a reproduction or a usable original could be bought?

Thanks,

W. Dancey
 

corey872

Registered
I don't have many answers - just replying so I can follow this thread. I've been tearing into my own rust bucket of a "New Sattley". Goal for now is really just to get it running with as much 'all original' as possible.

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=156000

I decided I should probably tune up my mill before diving into the machine work...that led to upgrading acme screws for ball screws...that led to the option of adding CNC ...that led to a whole other project of computers, wiring, stepper motors, fabricating brackets, etc. So hopefully in a few months when all that is done, I can get back to the original project!
 

SteamachinesLD

Registered
Hi All,

Been awhile since I posted here. College and other things have gotten in the way of work on the Sattley, but the project is not dead! I have been picking away at the engine the past few days, and real progress is starting to be made. Hopefully I can get it looking nice and running well before August. So far, I have:

- Started construction of a new cart for the engine to rest on. I have attached a picture below, and this step of the project will be finished when I get around to fabricating legs for the rear of the cart.

- Disassembled the drip oiler. This included cleaning it, polishing the brass, making new gaskets for the top and bottom, and repairing a small crack at the top of the stem.

-Scraping off old paint in preparation for a fresh coat.

-Polishing of the magneto casing. To remove the heavy green oxidation and as much tarnish as possible, I used a paste made of salt, white vinegar and flour with much success. Afterwards, I was able to get a nice finish with some brasso.

-Removed a considerable amount of gunk from the water hopper.

Anyone have suggestions for what color of paint to use on the engine? I want to be as historically accurate as possible, and am not sure what kind of green was used originally or what paint others have used and are happy with. All suggestions are welcome!

W.R.
 

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1320Fastback

Registered
I have a Throttler Sattley with solid flywheels and just use normal gasoline in it. Sometimes will mix in a little diesel for aroma.

Drip oil can be any modern engine oil. It all is better than what they used back in the day.
 

SteamachinesLD

Registered
Hi all,

Legs for the cart are being fabricated at the moment, and I'll post when they are finally attached to the cart. In the meantime, thought I'd post a few pictures of the polishing done on the magneto.

I first used a paste made of salt, flour and white vinegar. This was left on for 24 hours and removed a great deal of the heavy oxidation, and left a pink color on the casing. After the paste was removed, I was able to use Brasso to get a very nice finish. Considering how it looked when I started, I'm very happy with the result.

I suspect that it will only continue to improve as time passes and more polishing is done.

W.R.
 

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SteamachinesLD

Registered
Hi All,

It's been awhile since I posted to this thread, so first a quick update. The new cart has been fitted to the engine after I finally found some time to fabricate the rear legs. I couldn't be happier with the way it all turned out.

Went to fire it up yesterday, but to no avail. After some tinkering, testing and reading I have deduced that it's a problem with the ignition. The mag has spark, but I believe the spark plug is "leaking" after consulting the Wico EK magneto manual. It came with a vintage Tiger TX spark plug (see picture) which are now seemingly hard to come by. So, does anyone know of a modern equivalent to the Tiger TX spark plug that could be gotten at a regular retail store?

Thanks!

W.R.
 

Attachments

Turbo

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/12/2019
Those plugs tend to foul quickly. I bought a box of them several years ago and had nothing but problems with them fouling. As Steve posted, your old plug is much better. Just take it apart and clean it. I only use old take apart plugs. If I see some for sale I try to buy them. The reason the new ones foul is because the porcelain insulators are not ceramic coated and are very porous. This causes the carbon to glue itself to the insulator. Especially in these slow running, rich burning hit and miss engines. The old plugs have ceramic coated insulators and the carbon will clean off very easily. Just do not sandblast or wire wheel!!!
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
Those plugs tend to foul quickly. I bought a box of them several years ago and had nothing but problems with them fouling. As Steve posted, your old plug is much better. Just take it apart and clean it. I only use old take apart plugs. If I see some for sale I try to buy them. The reason the new ones foul is because the porcelain insulators are not ceramic coated and are very porous. This causes the carbon to glue itself to the insulator. Especially in these slow running, rich burning hit and miss engines. The old plugs have ceramic coated insulators and the carbon will clean off very easily. Just do not sandblast or wire wheel!!!
What you are saying sounds reasonable to me. I wonder if there is a way you could ceramic coat the new ones to make them perform better? I know they have all kind of ceramic Coatings for exhaust headers and such like.
 
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