Non-farm steam pics

Mike,
Good idea! Do you mind if I contribute a few? I have photos in my gallery that I have no place to post them. I guess if Craig moves us, he moves, but this is steam stuff and steam powered darn near everything that wasn't human or horse powered in the industrial age. I have scans at home of elevators, lawn mowers, icemobiles and many other things that were steam powered. This first one is of a ditch digger being used in Lewistown, Montana where I was born and raised.

This is a photo, circa 1908, of a Stanley steamer taken in Butte, America.

This one is of a 70 Ton Bucyrus steam shovel used by the Northern Pacific Railroad in Montana.

This last one really touches my heart. It shows the "Block P" (Thomas Power) steamboat, Rosebud, headed up the Missouri River from St. Louis to Fort Benton, Montana in the 1870s. This picture was taken in Montana Territory at Drowned Man Rapids and my grandfather Frank Anton Jager worked on this steamboat and three others from 1874-76. In 1876, he stayed the winter in Fort Benton (the world's innermost port) and herded mules for Thomas Power, then was a muleskinner, bull whacker and plain old freighter until he took up homestead near there in the Judith Basin in 1881.
Gary
 

Gary K

Subscriber
Here's 2 photos I took in the engine room of the B. F. Affleck in 1969. The first one (color) is at the throttle deck of the 2,000 h.p. triple expansion steam engine.

I don't have any spec's on this engine, except what I have on the triple expansion engine of the D. G. Kerr, which was built in 1916. The Kerr's engine had the following bores: H.P. 24 1/4", I.P. 41", and the L.P. 65", with a 42" stroke.

The second photo (B & W) is the crankshaft on the Affleck. I remember the engineer said, it had 14" diameter journals. I helped the 1st engineer in one of the lower ports pulling one of the main bearing caps off, so we could lay round lead stock on the journal, then torque the cap back on, then removing it, so we could mic the leads for clearance. Did the same on the L.P. connecting rod.
 

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Mike,
I guess non-farm includes steam locomotives? This first photo is of a Great Northern R-2 articulated locomotive pictured here in Whitefish, Montana, about six blocks from where I am writing this. This was the largest locomotive used on the GNRY. I know nothing of "tractive effect" or cubic inches, but the old (now dead) GNRY R-2 engineers I used to visit with, said they were "The largest." I have also heard that about the Big Boy and the Triplex back east. I don't know and am just passing that along for your information.

This IS the Big Boy, as used by The Union Pacific RR and was taken in a city park in Wyoming by my coffee, and old iron, buddy, Nick Poncelet here in Whitefish.

This is a picture torn from an old magazine or newspaper of sorts and shows a Mallet compound engine, with someone squatted inside the low pressure cylinder. I don't know whether this is an overhaul or new assembly?

This was a steam powered snow blower, plowing on the old "Jawbone" Railroad in Lewistown, Montana. This railroad is the one that opened up the agricultural products produced in the Judith Basin to the outside world of commerce, in 1903. If you've never been inside a steam snow blower compartment, they had (or at least the one I was in) their own boiler and steam engine to turn the blower, independent of the locomotive that pushed it.
Gary
 

Dalene Deck

New member
Re: Non-farm steam

Steam is alive and well in Chama, New Mexico. This is Cumbres & Toltec 484/488 double heading up the 4% grade between Chama and Cumbres Pass 10/15/2005. :D

Dalene
 

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Gary, Nice pictures. I have a few, but will have to see what I can do to post them. Our club has a B&E shovel like in your picture. Ours is bigger a 103C. It will be a while before it is in runable condition. But working on it.
 

Tim Searson

eMail NOT Working
Hi :wave:
Here is a Canadian engine;) Engine # 2816:D
This picture was taken in June 11th 2003 in London Ontario at the Canadian Pacific yard on a cross canada trip from coast to coast i belive anyway the first two pictures are in the yard, and the last is of the engine leaving tho go to Windsor, Ontario
Tim:)
 

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Colin

New member
Tim i was thinking of posting a few pictures of 2816 but you beat me to it!:brows: we were lucky we knew one crew member and he let us sneak in the cab for a couple top secret pictures:D we were there not too long after they parked in brandon and the needle was still sitting close to 275lbs:eek: the road picture is when it was heading back west form brandon to Virden. i got to follow it for about 40 miles on the main line. that was an amazing experience because had never got to follow an engine on the line before. it averaged about 60mph. was nice to hear a steam whistle on the rail lines:)
 

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This is a Great Northern Railway steam crane uprighting a stear locomotive near Whitefish, Montana.

This is my friend, Laurie Barnes-Ford, tending her upright engine and boiler that powers their shingle mill.

This is a portable (no drive) steam shovel that belonged to the Flathead County Road Crew, being readied to pull to a jobsite with their Ten Ton Holt Crawler. That is a neat old truck too.

This is two Union Pacific steam cranes uprighting a trainwreck in Wyoming.
Gary
 

Gary K

Subscriber
Here's the spec's on the Yellowstone and Big Boy locomotives from my "American Locomotives" book.

For years these Yellowstones were the world's largest locomotives and they still remain near the top in this class. They were designed to haul 4,000-ton trains the 216 miles between Mandan, North Dakota, and Glendive, Montana, up 1.1% grades, which service they have performed most satisfactorily. Some improvements such as the addition of roller bearings have been made and their tractive power as last reported was 145,930 lbs.
Builder - Baldwin Locomotive Works. Cylinders (4) - 26" x 32". Weight, total - 1,125,400 lbs. Steam pressure - 250 lbs. Fuel - 27 tons. Water 21,200 gal. Dia. Drivers - 63" Tractive Effort (orig.) - engine - 140,000 lb. booster - 13,400 lb. R.R. Class - Z5.
72 of these locomotives were built, and were operated by the Northern Pacific, Southern Pacific, Baltimore & Ohio, and the DM & IR (Duluth Missabe & Iron Range).

Union Pacific's "Big Boy" locomotive: These 4000 series locomotives can operate on any part of the system and can do up to 80 mph, but produce maximum power continuously at 70 mph. They were perhaps the Union Pacific's most important factor in their handling of wartime freight, developing 6,000 drawbar horsepower at 45 mph, and each doing the work of two other locomotives on one of the toughest hauling jobs on any American railroad.
Builder - American Locomotive Co. Cylinders (4) - 23 3/4" x 32". Weight, total - 1,208,750 lb. Steam Pressure - 300 lb. Fuel 28 tons. Water - 25,000 gal. dia. Drivers - 68" Tractive Effort - 135,375 lb. R.R. Class - 4000

Attachment photo #1 is a Yellowstone at Proctor, Minnesota. My daughter Patti is standing alongside #225.

Attachment photo #2 is Soo Lines Mikados, No. 1024, on display at Thief River Falls, Minnesota. Locomotive built by ALCO's Dunkirk Works in 1912.

Attachment photo #3 is W.M.S.T.R.'s locomotive #353.
 

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Gary K

Subscriber
Photo #1 is Jim Briden's Case Steam Road Roller powering a rock crusher . . . I think?

Photo #2 is Bill Briden's 1923 Model 21 Marion Steam Shovel.

Photo #3 is a 1928 50-B Bucrus Erie steam shovel. This is the largest coal-fired steam shovel still operating in North American to our knowledge. It sold brand new for $22,500. It was donated to the show by Bill Rudicill, KY.
Courtesy of Memories of Bygone Years (WMSTR) 2005
 

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John Hanson

New member
Well, here's a few from Nevada City, and Virginia City, MT. That little fire engine really wanted me to take it home... I just hope it doesn't just sit there and rot.
The locomotive is running a full schedule all summer, from what they said, and the people that were working on it were really nice and more than willing to talk, but we were running behind time, so will have to go back and give it a closer look one of these days. They did say they were always looking for qualified crew.
JH
 

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John Hanson

New member
This old beauty just sits along the road in Nevada City, MT... sure a sad sight...
Gary K, I remember the Fall of 2004, we showed horses at the Pomona Fair (LosAngeles, CA) and all the time I was there, I could hear a low, beautiful whistle blow every so often... I thought it sounded like a riverboat whistle, and figured it was something to do with the huge carnival on the other side of the fairgrounds. Only a couple weeks after getting back home, did I find out that they have a steam museum that joins the fairgrounds, and that whistle was from the BigBoy that they have there... just my luck...that close and still so far away!!:bonk: :rant: Maybe if we show there this year....:shrug:
JH
 

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Gary K said:
Here's the spec's on the Yellowstone and Big Boy locomotives from my "American Locomotives" book.

For years these Yellowstones were the world's largest locomotives and they still remain near the top in this class. They were designed to haul 4,000-ton trains the 216 miles between Mandan, North Dakota, and Glendive, Montana, up 1.1% grades, which service they have performed most satisfactorily. Some improvements such as the addition of roller bearings have been made and their tractive power as last reported was 145,930 lbs.
Builder - Baldwin Locomotive Works. Cylinders (4) - 26" x 32". Weight, total - 1,125,400 lbs. Steam pressure - 250 lbs. Fuel - 27 tons. Water 21,200 gal. Dia. Drivers - 63" Tractive Effort (orig.) - engine - 140,000 lb. booster - 13,400 lb. R.R. Class - Z5.
72 of these locomotives were built, and were operated by the Northern Pacific, Southern Pacific, Baltimore & Ohio, and the DM & IR (Duluth Missabe & Iron Range).

Union Pacific's "Big Boy" locomotive: These 4000 series locomotives can operate on any part of the system and can do up to 80 mph, but produce maximum power continuously at 70 mph. They were perhaps the Union Pacific's most important factor in their handling of wartime freight, developing 6,000 drawbar horsepower at 45 mph, and each doing the work of two other locomotives on one of the toughest hauling jobs on any American railroad.
Builder - American Locomotive Co. Cylinders (4) - 23 3/4" x 32". Weight, total - 1,208,750 lb. Steam Pressure - 300 lb. Fuel 28 tons. Water - 25,000 gal. dia. Drivers - 68" Tractive Effort - 135,375 lb. R.R. Class - 4000
Attachment photo #1 is a Yellowstone at Proctor, Minnesota. My daughter Patti is standing alongside #225.


Gary K,
Can you locate any statistics on the Great Northern's R-2 articulateds? Your picture of the Yellowstona and your daughter reminded me of this picture of a Great Northern L-2 at Havre, Montana and my daughter Mevanie posing. This was early spring, so her legs are covered, as we'd just left a couple of feet of snow in Minneapolis!
Gary
 
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John Hanson said:
Well, here's a few from Nevada City, and Virginia City, MT. That little fire engine really wanted me to take it home... I just hope it doesn't just sit there and rot.
The locomotive is running a full schedule all summer, from what they said, and the people that were working on it were really nice and more than willing to talk, but we were running behind time, so will have to go back and give it a closer look one of these days. They did say they were always looking for qualified crew.
JH
John,
I stood and admired that very same steam fire pumper in 1953, when it was located at Old Town, Great Falls, Montana State Fairgrounds. Charley Bovey had Old Town set up in there and the bulk of the buildings at Nevada City, Montana are from Old Town. I have very happy memories in Old Town as a ten year old. There was also the truck mounted steam fire engine that is now located at Bigfork. Those guys asked me to come look at that outfit to see what I thought it might need to be fired up. I know they aren't your usual upright steam boiler, but I probably should go? Old Town also had about 25 old cars too and I don't think a single one of them was newer than 1914.
Gary;)
 
I had posted these photos somewhere else on another thread, but they are worth placing here. It sure brings out the child in me. It seems like I can almost hear a caliope too?:bonk:
Gary;)
I grew up playing around this merry go round engine that Charlie Tyler bought years ago. To my knowledge he never fired it up. It is complete, free and shedded. Notice it has the "V" rim in the flywheel, where the cable ran that turned the merry go round, which also had a "V" underneath the deck.

This is what a Merry Go Round engine looks like in action. This photo was taken in the early 20th century in New York State and the clothing worn really speaks loudly to me. I would love to have been there!
 

Craig A

Moderator
Staff member
This forum is Stationary Steam and Traction.....:D
These pics are wonderful.....
In fact I have a few at home that a Stak member from Alaska sent me.........NOW I know where to POST them....;)
Craig
 
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