Non-farm steam pics

T James Ives

Subscriber
I thought you may like these.

The Loco is a replica of the first steam loco of 1802 By Richard Trevithick.
The second is a roller of c 1920
Then a Savage galloper engine- I tried for a better picture but the miserable owner would not let me on the ride!
Last a fire pump from before 1880 after this date only two cylinder models were made.
 

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T James Ives

Subscriber
Thanks...

Here are some pictures of the oldest working loco in England.

It dates from 1863 and altough 'semi retired ' now it still hauls a couple of vintage carriages on quite a good gradient.

The Furness Railway site page for No 20 is www.furnessrailwaytrust.org.uk/fr20.htm

When I took the pictures a couple of years ago I did not realise it was as old as it is, or that there are plenty of folks who would like to see them or I would have taken a few more.

It has just had its 10 year full boiler inspection and general overhaul and is now back in one piece to do some more runs.

The viaduct is on a neighbouring line but is typical of many in England.

Trevor
Trevor
 

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Doug E.

New member
Mike,
I guess non-farm includes steam locomotives? This first photo is of a Great Northern R-2 articulated locomotive pictured here in Whitefish, Montana, about six blocks from where I am writing this. This was the largest locomotive used on the GNRY. I know nothing of "tractive effect" or cubic inches, but the old (now dead) GNRY R-2 engineers I used to visit with, said they were "The largest."


Gary
Gary,

Thanks for the good image of the R-2. They did have a tractive effort (drawbar pull) of 147,000 lbs, which was unmatched by any other recip. steam loco in the country. They were simple articulated locos, and were built by the GN themselves in the Hillyard shops on the north edge of Spokane. Iirc, these were the first locos the GN built. Nothing like starting out big!

Thanks for all the intersting images!

Doug
 
Doug,
Thank you for that post and explanation. I knew some of that stuff, but hate having things crammed back down my throat:bonk: when I'm "mistaken", so sometimes my reluctance makes me "omit!" I am glad you knew and would state it.

I didn't want to get into some "Big Boy" urinating contest that I knew I couldn't win!:shrug:
Thanks again!!
Gary:O
 

Mark L. Jordan

New member
T James Ives,

Why didn't the English locos of the 1800's have "enclosed" cabs like the American engines? I've seen may pictures of "open" or "partially enclosed" cabs, but they always seemed to leave the crew exposed to the elements...?

Mark the Inquisitor:confused:
 
yes they did a very good job. it was fun to play with the big engine. when we let it steam down i kept the engine running as long as possible. it ran the boiler right down untill it hit the peg, ran for about 30 minets on less than 5 pounds. i thought it would take more than that to run the thing. i hope rick has a picture?
 

Malcolm Young

New member
T James Ives,

Why didn't the English locos of the 1800's have "enclosed" cabs like the American engines? I've seen may pictures of "open" or "partially enclosed" cabs, but they always seemed to leave the crew exposed to the elements...?

Mark the Inquisitor:confused:
There are various reasons for the lack of cabs on early English locomotives. First, we do not generally get the extremes of climate found in the USA. Second, before the railways, long distance travel was by stage coach and the crews (driver & guard) on these were out in the open in all weathers. The early railway and locomotive builders could see no reason for wasting money on such luxuries as any protection from the elements for the trainmen. In fact when the first weatherboards were installed on locomotives, the crews protested about being mollycoddled by the management! Even up to the end of steam on British Railways in 1968, some driving cabs were very basic and many were not fitted with proper seats, it was thought that the drivers (engineers) should not be made too comfortable as they would not concentrate on what they were doing. This type of attitude still persists among some managers even today. I speak from experience, having been a fireman then driver (engineer) for the last 40 years!

Malc. :cool:
 

T James Ives

Subscriber
The carriages were open trucks in the early days with 1st class passengers in stagecoach bodies tied on!

Theres talk of snow on another thread- we have just had the first dusting (1") which is very rare before mid January, 34 years since last.
The engine crews must have been hardy. It is rare for traction engines to have even a spectacle plate I have only seen two, one a roller and on a local delivery service engine.

Trevor
 
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