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Non OSHA approved signs for your machine shop

Frank DeWitt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/17/2019
Here lies Jim. A good father, husband and citizen but very little knowledge regarding chain saws.

Printed on a card I received from a friend just after buying my first chain saw. I stapled it to the wall above the shelf I kept the chain saw on. It served as a warning.
 

Bear67

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/02/2020
Frank
I am always amazed that there not more accidents with inexperienced operators of chain saws. I ran chain saws all my life, starting with Dad's old vertical cylinder Polan at about age 12. But!!

Fifty plus years ago as a newly married income impaired young gun who thought accidents happened to other folks, I had a brain fart and came closed to really losing my Azz. We heated the whole house with wood so I ran a chain saw often cutting wood, building fence and other chores. We had some high winds and a limb had broken off about 4-5 feet from the trunk of a large Red Oak which leaned over the cattle guard where the county road ended and you came onto our place. My then Bride was worried it would fall and block our way in and out. Went down with loader tractor and it would not reach, so I ran the loader bucket up next to the trunk of the oak opposite of the broken, but still attached tree limb. Climbed up the loader and got myself on the offending limb. Was holding onto the trunk and reaching way out with the running saw, made an undercut and was cutting down. Now the rest of the story, as Paul Harvey would say. When I cut through the about 6" limb, the momentum of the saw swung down and back towards my hind parts. I don't know the total thought process, but I am pretty sure I just held on with left hand to keep from falling and bouncing off the cattle guard. The still turning chain reached the Wrangler jeans (thank God denim is tough). Pretty sure my pucker factor helped, but the chain had ripped from pocket to pocket across the backside of my pants, but and not cut my fruit of the looms. I am pretty sure my white drawers would have been stained if my brain had had time to tell my innards to crap at that instant in time.

My new wife was teaching school, so I was alone and ran to the house, put on clean jeans and put the cut pair in the burn barrel out back. I did not tell her about it for several years and she still got hot on my case. I probably should have saved those tighty whities and put them in a glass case. You still can not buy Kevlar underwear, but cut resistant leggings have made sense every since.

O to be young and dumb again. She would probably say I am old and dumb. :bonk:
 

Frank DeWitt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/17/2019
Frank
I am always amazed that there not more accidents with inexperienced operators of chain saws. I ran chain saws all my life, starting with Dad's old vertical cylinder Polan at about age 12. But!!
Two things have helped me out recently. I hired a pro to take down a leaner that was too close to the house for my skills. He went to the truck for his chain saw but first put on protective pants. I thought, If he as a pro thinks he needs protection what makes me think I can get along with out them. I ordered a pair that day.

Second, I now use a battery powered chain saw. As I maneuver myself into position the saw is not running. When I finish the cut, the saw is not running. That feature and the first start in the spring make me grin. I will never go back to gas.
 

Bear67

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/02/2020
Amen Frank
I have 12", 18" and 30" inch gasoline saws, but we recently bought 18V Milwaukee saw to go with our cordless battery system already on hand. It works lots better than I expected. Also have a pole saw to match.

I have a Hispanic tree contractor that I call when it is something I think we can not handle on our own. He is bonded and insured and I often wonder how he can price his work as cheaply as he does. I have helped him find a loader tractor and backhoe in the past, so maybe it is brother in law pricing. I just know he does good work. Recently I had 5 bark beetle killed pine trees about 100' tall that had to be taken down here next to the house. My son and I took down two that we could get a cable on to start the fall. We use a snatch block and set the tractor where it is away from fall line. I let the tree man take down the other 3 and we use the forks on the backhoe to move the trunks and tops To save money, I just have him drop them and we take care of the tops and trunks. His laborers helped load the tops on my trailers to haul to a burn pile. I have forks on a skid loader but 30+ inch pine an hardwood logs are heavy. I was able to call a local logger and sell those 5 and he took to a sawmill. Not a lot of cash, but it paid for the tree trimmer crew cost. My son teaches Texas parks employees all over the state how to safely fell trees as that is part of his job as a regional director, but he too knows when to call in reinforcements.

At my age, I am beyond climbing trees, but we still do what we can to save any nickels we can. Be safe out there guys. Wear eye protection and felling chaps.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
Friend in Nv that cuts firewood is somewhat safety conscious, by the time he is geared up it looks like he is ready to ride a screaming chip spitting bull, knee high leather boots, leather chaps, elbow length leather gloves, safety glasses, full face shield, ear muffs, and a hard had. Seems just a tad excessive to me, I sometimes wear hiking boots, always leather work gloves and always safety glasses. I will admit to a momentary lapse of tool control a few years ago, touched top of thigh momentarily with a moving blade:yikes:, nice rip in the jeans, did not touch skin, note to self "DON'T DO THAT AGAIN!"
 

Frank DeWitt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/17/2019

Duey C

Subscriber
Age
55
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
Fantastic signs! The no brain... :)
I can run a saw for awhile and then it's time to quit for a day or week. Cripes, I've been up an oak tree with pole gaf's and a belt in the front yard to finish off a breaking limb. Thankfully, the saw refused to start or I lost my nerve... I've put that little detail out.
So I did it again later with an axe. Still pretty dumb.
And my wife doesn't get it why I refuse to teach her how to start and use one of my saws.
When a young fella came into the area to help our young engineer run a 300-350 horse stationary steam engine, I welcomed him, showed him around, chewed him up and down about how the engine won't even slow down if you put your hand, arm, leg or head in the wrong place, showed him the worst spots then thanked him for being with us!
No mistakes.
 

Peter Holmander

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
My Son In Law's father had a tree removal business all his life so his 2 sons still perform this work today. The oldest son Frank was working clearing a house lot and a huge oak limb that was dead fell off a tree and hit him squarely on top of his head. He told me it knocked him out cold and that if he had not been wearing a hard hat, he might not be here telling me this story today.
 

78Loadstar

Registered
Last Subscription Date
11/14/2018
About a week ago a guy a couple counties over, chainsaw bucked came up into his face. He was by himself but rode his four wheeler home. Went to hospital and died. Please be carefull.
 

Glenn Ayers

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/18/2019
I put that second one together several years ago.
I found that picture of the guy inspecting his inner self on the net & couldn't resist making a shop sign for our shop at work.
I was always telling the guys "To pull their head out of their ass & look around at what's going on around them"

.
 

AKMark

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
04/11/2019
I always liked the one at the Honda shop "Stupid Hurts" written on a bandaid
 

jgreen416

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
01/23/2020
We are sometimes lucky the excesses of our youth do not kill or seriously injure us. I learned early to respect machinery, be sober and careful in its use. In the late fifties handled our geared Strunk (wish I had that now) weighed a bunch, 25 lbs or more. Worked in our 56 in circular saw mill, felled trees, snaked logs with tractors. Was always careful never got hurt. Now in my mid seventies I could still drop a tree, limb it and haul it away but it would take all day where someone else could do it in an hour. That’s why I have paid for two tree removals in the past two years. Let the young guys do it and relax. Love those signs.
JG
 
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