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Off topic question... Automotive Service Manuals

EICBob

Subscriber
Age
62
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
I apologize up front if this is in the wrong place... was hoping to tap into the great wisdom that resides here :)

Having been a former ASE and Chrysler Master Technician, I have a fairly large collection of factory service/troubleshooting manuals covering the years 1984 through 1992. I was wondering if in the collective opinions of the folks here, do these have any value?
I hate to toss things like this as they do contain a wealth of information on troubleshooting the various systems for Dodge and Chrysler.

-BobC
 

JohnnyC

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
03/18/2020
I apologize up front if this is in the wrong place... was hoping to tap into the great wisdom that resides here :)

Having been a former ASE and Chrysler Master Technician, I have a fairly large collection of factory service/troubleshooting manuals covering the years 1984 through 1992. I was wondering if in the collective opinions of the folks here, do these have any value?
I hate to toss things like this as they do contain a wealth of information on troubleshooting the various systems for Dodge and Chrysler.

-BobC
Bob,
I would guess they may only have nostalgic value. Everything is online now for today's techs. At BMW each tech has their own PC on their workbench for which any and all information regarding BMW is at their finger tips and keyboard. No paper manuals.

If there are any local classic car clubs in your area you may want to contact them. Back in the days when I was heavily involved in the old classic and muscle cars (1990's - early 2000's) we all had pride in our garages where we built our cars and frequently entertained our car friends. It was our "man cave" and a set of old manuals would be a good show piece, but you manuals may be too new however it is worth a shot rather than throwing them out.


JohnnyC
New Jersey
 

Wayne 440

Registered
If by "value" you mean monetary value- they are probably not worth much. I have bought similar for a couple of dollars each. I have a pile of them and refer to one only every few years.
 

EICBob

Subscriber
Age
62
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
Was thinking more along the lines of our ONAN manual repository and not dollars and cents.
Just hate to toss them out.
Not too many car clubs up here that center around MOPAR of that vintage.
Thanks for the insight :)


(It is very lonely here at the office..our new mode of operation is a one person rotation at the physical support office. Today is my turn)

-BobC
 

Peter Holmander

Subscriber
Age
71
Last Subscription Date
12/23/2019
Good luck Bob ! Like other members have said, with everything online today, no one is interested in manuals anymore. Back when I was working at the former Navy base at Quonset / Davisville RI, they were cleaning out an old technical library building. Hundreds of manuals for all sorts of equipment were being tossed in big dumpsters. It just killed me to see all those manuals being trashed. I grabbed some of them and took them home with the intentions of getting them to someone who could use them when I had some free time. The automotive stuff drew no interest at all. Even some of the old equipment manuals did not move. I had old Bucyrus Erie crane manuals, several bulldozer manuals, manuals for skid steers, a bunch of them. I even had two Case wheel loader repair manuals that were 6 inches thick. Everything I got rid of I sold very cheap. One of the case manuals went to a guy in Maine. The town he lives in escapes me. After trying unsuccessfully for about 2 yrs I ended up throwing all I had left away. I listed them on a Heavy Equipment forum online in the antique equipment classifieds. About a month ago, I got a reponse from a guy who wanted a Case wheel loader manual. I told the guy that it was sold. I didn't have the heart to tell him that it went in the trash. Telling him that would have served no purpose. If I were you, like JohnnyC suggested, I would try to find a forum online for a Chrysler car club. Good luck.
 

J.B. Castagnos

Registered
Last Subscription Date
01/01/2006
I like looking at a book also. Now I sit at the computer and if it takes ten seconds for something to come up it seems like forever. Then I realize if I had to use a book my shop would be full of manuals to have this much info on hand and it would probably take 20 minutes just to find the correct one.
 

Motorhead

Subscriber
Age
67
Last Subscription Date
07/09/2019
I was in the Chrysler/Plymouth Trouble Shooting Contest in 1970 when I was Senior in High School. We were the third car to finish out of 50. All cars were 318's, 2 bbl, automatics. Got myself and my partner in the contest, our picture of us working on the car. All you could see of me was my BUTT and the Vibram soles of my boots as I was working on the distributor back by the firewall.
 

EICBob

Subscriber
Age
62
Last Subscription Date
07/13/2019
I was in the Chrysler/Plymouth Trouble Shooting Contest in 1970 when I was Senior in High School. We were the third car to finish out of 50. All cars were 318's, 2 bbl, automatics. Got myself and my partner in the contest, our picture of us working on the car. All you could see of me was my BUTT and the Vibram soles of my boots as I was working on the distributor back by the firewall.
I remember those 318’s!!
Good engines
In 1986 I was second in the New England repair region for technical expertise. The 1st place guy was from my shop too!
Good times :)

-BobC
 

zuhnc

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2019
I put a 1968 model 318 (the one with the "wavy" rocker arm covers) into a 1970 Pinto station wagon, 4-speed, rear axle from a Mustang II. Hydraulic clutch. Installed a Vari-jet carburetor on it. Couldn't keep the tires stuck to the ground, but got excellent fuel mileage with that carb. zuhnc
 

JoeE.

Registered
It's handy to set in the house and be able to google information on an item to see how to repair it, but when you're leaning over the fender or up under the dash working on something, nothing beats the printed page.

If I do find something on the net, I still print off sheets with the info on it...to have at my fingertips.

The next best thing is having a youtube video playing with a person describing what you need to be doing.

It's impractical to have a "computer" out where you're working.
 

Sooty Jim

Registered
I disagree that these manuals have no value, either monetarily or intrinsically. Granted, it depends a lot on the manual. The manual for a 1990 Reliant K... maybe not so much, but an '89 D/W-200 Cummins, yeah. You might try offereing the manuals to an auto book dealer. Not sure where you are located but when I have excess, I sell or trade to Bruce Roth at Roth Autobooks in Fort Wayne, IN. Found him to be fair, both on the buying and selling side, plus he's only an hour away. How much he will pay depends on how popular the book might be and how many he has in stock. If he refuses a book, most likely it's not worth much effort to find it a home. My favorite thing is to trade something I don't need for something I do. What I write about changes, so the reference material I use tends to rotate by what market I'm working in at the time (and by a finite amount of space). Now that I'm into geezerhood, and starting to wind it down (in no way retired yet), I'm going to be making more space on my shelves (and ease the strain on the floor joists).

In almost all respects, I prefer a paper manual to a computer. For my work I have walls full of manuals going back to 1917, or so, for reference material. I wouldn't mind having all that digitized to save space but when it comes to working on my own stuff, I prefer paper. I have a 2017 Ford and the only manual for it is digital. I hate it. Very poorly done IMO vs the old style manuals. For context, I was once an ASE master, factory (England) trained to work on Land Rovers. Also worked at Ford, Porsche, Audi and VW dealerships and had some factory training on them as well. Also worked at a number of independt shops before I took a side road in my automotive career.

Plymouth Troubleshooting Contest... wow! I also competed in '70 and again in '71. Did pretty good one year, maybe 3rd or 4th in a Big California region, but got stumped on the other one. Big time. Don't remember what it was that stumped me any more, just the total chagrin and head-slapping embarrassment at it being something small and easy.
 

Ben Cowan

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/07/2019
Got an off topic question for you guys. With all this corona shit, I went to town and with low fuel prices filled a 55 gal drum with unleaded. Added stability. Any thoughts about easy way to unload from a 4-8 utility trailer? I’m 64 and in pretty good shape but don’t want to lay drum down and get in a bind! Any chain attachments top and bottom work on block and tackle ? Don’t have a 3 point lift attachment for my kubota. I could muscle it off but trying to find a smart solution for years ahead! Luck to all Ben
 
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