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Old Disconnect

Frank DeWitt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/17/2019
Just picked this up. I don't know the history. I assume they were used as a whole house disconnect. It has provision for a lead / wire seal.


 

NDmeterman

Registered
Probably back when flat-rate DC service was a thing.

As long as you didn't blow the fuse you pay the same amount every month. The cutout looks to be arranged so there's no heavy arc if opened under load due to the two break points.
 

Frank DeWitt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/17/2019
Thanks for the info. The two break points also make changing fuses easy.

I plan to put it to use as the main disconnect on my generator display.
 

GeneratorGus

Registered
Age
72
As long as I'm on the subject.
I believe this rather crude, home made looking deal was at the least used for some sort of higher voltage DC. I wish all of it was there, what I suspect was the contact has nothing but a pile of solder where it should have been.

I have a few arc fixtures, a couple of them were used hard and put up wet.
Another, Western Electric (550 VDC), was missing the globe and it's holder. A goldfish bowl and coffee can now replace the missing parts. I've never tried to light it.
The nicest one hangs in my den, German made, it uses a clockwork mechanism to feed the electrode.
Most of the arc light literature I can find shows that they used the current draw from the arc to magnetically regulate the arc gap.
And, not to be out done, someone came up with the idea to burn your skin to a perfect tan with this device.:uhoh: In the last picture that is the safety goggles hanging there, they came with one of them.

GUS
 

Attachments

Frank DeWitt

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
12/17/2019
Frank,
Here are a coupe pics of a couple I have.

GUS
Very nice, but a question. It looks like when the round one is turned off it shorts the input, (and the output) I must have that wrong.

Frank

---------- Post added at 11:22:25 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:19:15 AM ----------

As long as I'm on the subject.

GUS
Wow. Big grin. Thanks for sharing those.

Frank
 

Vanman

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
That shorting of the input is to keep the externally supplied constant current (series) supply continuous. That is a VERY neat switch to have!
 

NDmeterman

Registered
Definitely neat to see those disconnects. Never really thought anyone would dare run a series lighting loop INTO a building, given the high open-circuit voltage (there is a reason they were strung on the same type of insulators as the primary distribution circuits they often shared a crossarm with).

I once had a couple series cutouts that were mounted in the base of a few streetlamp posts, but I have since sold them on to new owners further east. The body and knob were both pressed from dry-process porcelain and at least the knob was glazed. One turned the knob 90 degrees to bypass the incoming circuit.

Gus, the electric meter you have in the background of a couple pictures is a General Electric Type I-10. Seems you're missing the terminal cover for it, which unfortunately also carried the nameplate.
 
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